#1
I think I should have finished reading one of the topics below about reading but I didn't. Lazy me.

I already have a hal Leonard book about arpeggios, scales and chords. However imo the book lacks of explaining the scales etc. I would like to have a comprehensive theory book which explains how to combine scales etc, and how to determine what to play on progressions.

I would also like to have a book on amps which explains how different amps work, how effects work and just "simply" everything about amps.

Currently writing with a phone and I've got an appointment at the dentist's so doing this in a hurry. I would prefer buying the books from Thomann.
#2
Quote by Billie_J

I would also like to have a book on amps which explains how different amps work, how effects work and just "simply" everything about amps.

Go here
#4
I'd rather have a book. I don't like "studying" with the internet, for some reason. It's more comfortable with a book.
#5
if you ask in the quick questions thread in G G&A I'm sure some of the regulars could recommend some amp books.
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#6
"How to Improvise" by Hal Crooke is good, but lots of notation.

Ultimately, it all boils down to pattern matching (see whether a chord can be visualised within a scale, or nearly so), but with music these patterns don't have to be perfect matches, and often sound very cool if they're not.

My strongest advice is to learn interval shapes and sounds ... they are the foundation of everything sonically in music. And there's only a handful of shapes that can be mastered in around a week of 10 mins practice a day.

cheers, Jerry
#7
The problem I find with books is that they vary wildly in terms of quality and sometimes approach things so differently that two books explaining the same thing might seem completely detached. Sometimes they just approach subjects from an impractical viewpoint. Take Mark Levine's Jazz Theory Book for example. It's a nice book, but some of it's approaches to modes and scales are somewhat silly. So even though I really recommend it for anyone trying to figure out jazz improv, I'd warn them first that you can't take everything in the book at face value.

Also, a lot of classical theory books handle subjects like ascending/descending melodic minor which has no function in contemporary music.

Can you read sheet music at all? If you can, William Leavitt's "A Modern Method for Guitar" is a great book series. If you can't, Govan's technique books are very good. But don't follow everything in the books blindly. If you feel like some advice and theory explained doesn't work for you, find your own way of applying it. Common sense is always necessary when teaching yourself.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
Last edited by Kevätuhri at Jul 6, 2015,
#8
Quote by Kevätuhri
The problem I find with books is that they vary wildly in terms of quality and sometimes approach things so differently that two books explaining the same thing might seem completely detached. Sometimes they just approach subjects from an impractical viewpoint. Take Mark Levine's Jazz Theory Book for example. It's a nice book, but some of it's approaches to modes and scales are somewhat silly. So even though I really recommend it for anyone trying to figure out jazz improv, I'd warn them first that you can't take everything in the book at face value.

Also, a lot of classical theory books handle subjects like ascending/descending melodic minor which has no function in contemporary music.

Can you read sheet music at all? If you can, William Leavitt's "A Modern Method for Guitar" is a great book series. If you can't, Govan's technique books are very good. But don't follow everything in the books blindly. If you feel like some advice and theory explained doesn't work for you, find your own way of applying it. Common sense is always necessary when teaching yourself.


Ain't that the truth!

cheers, Jerry
#9
Hell yes.

Keva, Levine's book is more or less every gripe I have with chord scale theory and related concepts packed into one volume.

Ascending/descending MM isn't even real; I dunno what teacher started that whole thing.

But seriously, common sense and a willingness to experiment and self diagnose are invaluable.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#10
Quote by Jet Penguin

Keva, Levine's book is more or less every gripe I have with chord scale theory and related concepts packed into one volume.



I know right. I picked up the book some months ago on a recommendation. It's a nice book, really. But I'm glad I knew my way around CST before I started reading it. Otherwise I might actually think that I have to play the mixolydian shape over every dom7 chord I encounter.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#11
Or even refer to it as mixolydian. Ugh.

Dm7-G7-C is NOT nor will ever be in three different tonal areas. It's just C major. Nobody hears that as two modulations.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#12
If you don't like things being referred by their modal names in a strictly tonal context you need to run the f*** away the moment you see that book
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here