#1
Hello everybody, I just would like to know if there is a way to tune a Half Step UP from Drop D? If so, what would it be named? Drop Eb? I was just wondering, because I was writing a song, and the lowest chord was the D#5 chord (111xxx) and I know that tuning UP would turn (Drop D: 111xxx) into a (Drop D, Half Step Up: 000xxx). Anyone know how?
#2
take a tuner and tune it up a half step. That's all you have to do.
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#4
Yep, as above. Although this is assuming you don't have very tight strings, as if they're already tight in standard/drop D, they may snap when trying to tune up.
#5
Yeah, you can just tune up, there's nothing stopping you at all. The more usual thing to do, however, would be to put a capo on the 1st fret in drop D tuning. As I say, that's more of a convention though, there really is nothing at all stopping you from tuning up.

Probably the easiest way of actually accomplishing it with a guitar tuner would be to tune the low E down to Eb/D# and tune the rest of the guitar to itself by ear. The best thing to do would be to get a chromatic tuner and work it that way. Personally I much prefer a good chromatic tuner anyway, guitar tuners confuse the issue of what's actually going on and can't be used for basses and such very well.

And the name depends on who you talk to, most people would probably call it Drop D# or Drop Eb, but I know that some people would call it "Drop D up a half step". Really though it doesn't matter that much, anyone who wants to know what you would call it should be in good communication with you anyway.

Quote by TheLiberation
Yep, as above. Although this is assuming you don't have very tight strings, as if they're already tight in standard/drop D, they may snap when trying to tune up.

That's pretty unlikely; the change in tension would be less than the strings undergo during bends. If they snap being tuned up a half step then I would say they're either really old or a bad batch anyway.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Jul 7, 2015,
#6
Quote by TheLiberation
Yep, as above. Although this is assuming you don't have very tight strings, as if they're already tight in standard/drop D, they may snap when trying to tune up.

Um...why? The tension shouldn't be so tight that they would snap from tuning up a half a step. If they do snap, you probably should have replaced them anyway and should feel bad about how cheap you are.
#7
Depends, really. I still kinda have my "acoustic guitar" mindset this way, where I did have strings randomly snapping at times due to too much tension or tuning up too rapidly, but generally I'd be careful about tuning up if you have a lot of tension already. Unlikely to be an issue with a 10-46 set for example, but with 11s or more, I'd definitely be very careful.
#8
Couldn't you just tune to Eb? Unless you have a lot of chords which are impossibly to finger in regular tuning but are possible with drop tuning.
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