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#2
Yes.
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#3
You can, but it will likely be much harder and, even done very well, will probably sound mediocre.
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#4
Obviously you can, but I don't know why you'd want to. This type of "shredding" is played on electric guitar for a reason.
#5
Check out Al Di Meola.
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#6
You certainly can shred on an acoustic but if you look around you'll find that a lot of the people who do so focus more on picking than legato. That's not to say that shred-speed legato is impossible on an acoustic, it's just harder to get good tone and volume out of it than it is on an electric where you can actually just quieten your picking and turn everything up.

In my experience you'll also very rarely find people doing much in terms of tapping and hammers from nowhere on acoustic. Again, not impossible, just difficult to do and make it sound good within the shred framework.

All that said, particular names to look at are:

Angelo Debarre
Stochelo Rosenberg
Bireli Lagrene
Joscho Stephan
Al Di Meola
Paco De Lucia
John McLaughlin

They're all seriously accomplished players who have put out a good amount of material that's all acoustic based.

Particular favourite:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlAyEN07JjI
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#7
I have another question is it more difficult to do this on a semi-hollow body guitar like a gibson es-335 rather than on a solid body guitar like a strat/les paul or is it the same thing?
#8
Quote by adelino316
I have another question is it more difficult to do this on a semi-hollow body guitar like a gibson es-335 rather than on a solid body guitar like a strat/les paul or is it the same thing?


I'd say it depends on what you are used to. I play better on my hollow/semi-hollow guitars than i do on my strat. I am just used to the neck and feel of the hollow body more.

Simple answer is this, if you are used to doing something it is not more difficult. Difficulty arises from being unfamiliar with something.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#9
If you want to check out DiMeola, look for his earlier stuff....Especially the live sets he did with Paco DeLucia and John McLaughlin. In terms of sheer speed, this is about as quick as it gets for acoustic guitar.

I read DiMeola's interviews in Guitar Player back then when he hit the scene...He uses an advanced muting technique he calls the "Mutola" involving not only palm muting but fingertip muting with the fingers holding the pick.
This lets the individual notes "pop" at those very high speeds and retains clarity.

He's mellowed some in the intervening years......
#12
-yes you can shred on an acoustic if you apply yourself and have the talent, drive, and discipline to do so. it will be some work but it really depends upon what level you want to achieve. your guitar will have to be in top shape and set up very well. sting gage, neck relief, action and intonation -everything has to be just right in order for one to play fluidly and fast.

-semi hollow vs soild body. no difference neck wise especially with the dots and the gibsons. body wise is a different story. they are wider then their solid body brothers and some can be deeper as well. this will effect how you hold the thing. it may or may not be a problem. steve howe doesn't seem to mind.
#13
Can you shred on an acoustic? Yes.

Will it be harder? Definitely.

Will it sound good if you use the same shredding technique you use on electric? Definitely not.

In many respects, electric and acoustics are two different instruments with the same name because they happened to be string instruments that are tuned the same. You have to approach them differently to realize their full potential.
#14
As previously stated, acoustic shredding is based more heavily on alternate picking than legato. Though a lot of styles use pulloffs to open strings and short slides, particularly bluegrass. Tremolo picking and cross picking are also two very commonly used techniques. Try checking out players like Tony Rice or Doc Watson.

Quote by DarkHorseJ27
In many respects, electric and acoustics are two different instruments with the same name because they happened to be string instruments that are tuned the same. You have to approach them differently to realize their full potential.


I think that this is something that more people need to realize, similarly to how a piano and an organ are different instruments and therefore require different approaches.
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#15
Quote by ad_works
-yes you can shred on an acoustic if you apply yourself and have the talent, drive, and discipline to do so. it will be some work but it really depends upon what level you want to achieve. your guitar will have to be in top shape and set up very well. sting gage, neck relief, action and intonation -everything has to be just right in order for one to play fluidly and fast.

-semi hollow vs soild body. no difference neck wise especially with the dots and the gibsons. body wise is a different story. they are wider then their solid body brothers and some can be deeper as well. this will effect how you hold the thing. it may or may not be a problem. steve howe doesn't seem to mind.

ok but do you think it would be easier for me to get there in a strat or a les paul rather than a semi-hollow body?
#16
Quote by adelino316
ok but do you think it would be easier for me to get there in a strat or a les paul rather than a semi-hollow body?

Well the more pressing concern there is which of those is more like the sound you hear in your head. All three of them sound very different, and in fact different hollow bodies will also sound different.

Physically it'll be easier to play a regular solid body electric guitar... but that shouldn't be your top concern; no matter what, acquiring the kinds of skills you're talking about is going to take a lot of time and effort and the most important thing is making sure that you're working towards making the sounds you want. If that means playing an acoustic or semi-hollow of some kind then so be it.

All that said... if you don't know what you want to sound like yet, I'd say go for some kind of generic superstrat. That'll probably be easiest for you, in physical terms.
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#18
Quote by bocharovpasha
Instantly Yngwie came to mind

Not sure if this is necessarily a good example or not really, I'm 99% sure his acoustic tone is run through about 5 million layers of compression... but of course I could very well be wrong, and frankly either way he does shred the shit out of acoustics as well!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0DCLrWzcjI
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Album.
Legion.
#19
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Not sure if this is necessarily a good example or not really, I'm 99% sure his acoustic tone is run through about 5 million layers of compression... but of course I could very well be wrong, and frankly either way he does shred the shit out of acoustics as well!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0DCLrWzcjI


and just like his electric stuff, the stuff he plays more slowly sounds a lot better in my opinion. I guess when you have the ability to play that fast there is a compulsion to add a million extra notes everywhere.
#20
Pretty sure we're overdoing this. Fact is, yes, you can play legatos and shred on an acoustic guitar. Why would we need to go on?

As a side note, arpeggios are a frequently used technique for acoustic guitar.

Quote by adelino316
ok but do you think it would be easier for me to get there in a strat or a les paul rather than a semi-hollow body?


Bro, you have to find out yourself. That's a matter of whether YOUR hands and YOUR fingers would work on either a Les Paul or Stratocaster. Just go to a Guitar Centre and find out.
Last edited by LtnVasquez at Jul 8, 2015,
#21
absolutely.

consider this - normal electric guitar strings are a lighter gauge than acoustic strings. i tried putting lighter strings on my acoustic years ago and it sounded really bad. and as a result of the lighter strings, the action will be different on an electric guitar. then there's the fingerboard radius, which is usually smaller than on an acoustic.

Quote by adelino316
ok but do you think it would be easier for me to get there in a strat or a les paul rather than a semi-hollow body?
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#22
^ Actually most electric players would normally say a bigger radius actually facilitates shredding, rather than inhibits it. Most "shred" electric guitars have a pretty flat radius (16"+). Not quite flat but near enough. It's the more vintage-style/less shred-orientated electrics which have smaller radiuses.

Other than that, agreed.
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#23
Quote by LtnVasquez
As a side note, arpeggios are a frequently used technique for acoustic guitar.

Thing is, "arpeggios" really isn't a technique; they're a musical concept that can be executed with just about any technique you care to mention.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

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#24
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Thing is, "arpeggios" really isn't a technique; they're a musical concept that can be executed with just about any technique you care to mention.

Noted.
#25
And not only are arpeggios not a technique, they are also not even specific to shred.
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#27
I've been doing it on a banjo for years.
Granted I installed a pickup and put distortion on it but i think it's a cool sound.
whether it's sounds better or worse than electric guitar is individual taste
check out Rob Scallon on youtube for an example
murdering Metallica and Slayer on banjo
https://youtu.be/liBhu8DBzEQ

Sounds pretty awesome to me
Last edited by EyeNon15 at Jul 23, 2015,
#28
playing banjo with a pick is downright disrespectful
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#29
Individual taste, it's still a sound you won't be able to get from an electric guitar and vice versa
#30
Quote by EyeNon15
Sounds pretty awesome to me


It sounds pretty stupid to me.
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#31
Lucky for that guy everyone doesn't share your taste I guess.

Don't worry though there are still about 8 million other covers of Battery played on an electric guitar the exact same way as each other if you dont like this guy's rendition.
Last edited by EyeNon15 at Jul 23, 2015,
#32
you can play faster (and with a fuller tone) with your fingers (or especially fingerpicks) than a plectrum, especially on an instrument designed for fingerstyle...just cause these kids are talentless doesn't mean it's a matter of taste
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#33
Quote by EyeNon15
Don'thave worry though there are still about 8 million other covers of Battery played on an electric guitar the exact same way as each other if you dont like jthis guy's rendition.


But his rendition is exactly the same as the electric guitar covers.
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#34
Quote by theogonia777
But his rendition is exactly the same as the electric guitar covers.


Sounds a lot different to me

And obviously it sounds different to the guy who thinks it sounds like shit.

edit - WAIT, you are the guy who said it sounds like shit.
Which is it? Sounds exactly like an electric guitar cover or it sounds like shit???
Or you are saying that everyone that's ever done a cover of Battery sounds like shit????
Or that the original song itself sounds like shit??,

But whatever, I just put it up there because it seemed to fit the thread.

You can think the guy is garbage if you want, that's completely fine with me.
You can even claim that him suckling is not just your personal taste and that despite him touring and a having a huge following, everyone else knows he is garbage too.
Whatever one needs to do to rage out about it, have at it.
Last edited by EyeNon15 at Jul 24, 2015,
#35
Quote by EyeNon15

Which is it? Sounds exactly like an electric guitar cover or it sounds like shit???


Why not both?

To be entirely frank though, that discussion doesn't matter. OP didn't ask about playing metal on a Banjo, he asked about shredding on an acoustic. (I'd argue that Metallica ain't shred aswell, but as said, that is not relevant to this discussion)

We have already established that "shredding" can be done on acoustic. We've already had Yngwie Malmsteen and Tom Quayle (Two very different musicians and styles) shown here that primarily are electric players. Then we've seen Paco De Lucia (Fingerstyle player) and Al Di Meola (Pick player) show off their prowess on the instrument.

Yes you can is the answer to the question.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#36
Quote by Sickz
Why not both?

.


Well the difference is just saying that guy in particular sucks and saying that the song itself sucks therefore making everyone who has played it suck.

Of course you can believe all of those, which is why I asked him to clarify.

Banjo is acoustic intstrument that has a lot of similarities to guitar so I thought it might be interesting to add to the discussion.
If it's too far out there and this thread must absolutely positivity remain only about acoustic guitar shredding, that's fine too.
Last edited by EyeNon15 at Jul 24, 2015,
#37
Because he played it exactly the same as if he had played it on a guitar.

Now listen to this.

http://youtu.be/_cnR-hrq-cc
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Last edited by theogonia777 at Jul 24, 2015,
#38
Quote by theogonia777
Because he played it exactly the same as if he had played it on a guitar.

Yeah, this is the problem. People think that just playing instruments that aren't guitar is interesting, but a guitarist who hasn't learned to play a banjo is always just going to sound like a guitarist with a banjo which is, frankly, boring. Same problem with guitarists who switch to bass.

Somewhat relevant to the thread in that playing an acoustic guitar just like an electric guitar isn't going to get the best results.
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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Jul 24, 2015,
#39
Quote by theogonia777
Because he played it exactly the same as if he had played it on a guitar.


That's why I thought it fit on this thread.
Playing acoustic in a way normally reserved for electric guitar.

The sound achieved from them both sounds completely different to me, the Battery solo has never sounded like that to me before.

Not sure what you are saying though
If it sounds like shit to you because you hate the song or if it sounds like shit to you because he played it correctly or because you just don't like the tone of the instrument.

There's stuff like Iron Horse and Hayseed Dixie if you want to hear traditional style banjo players covering rock songs.

This guy's playing it like it's a guitar and sounds pretty cool to me.
Last edited by EyeNon15 at Jul 24, 2015,
#40
Quote by EyeNon15
That's why I thought it fit on this thread. Playing acoustic in a way normally reserved for electric guitar.

This guy's playing it like it's a guitar and sounds pretty cool to me.


It's just a gimmick. Some guy takes an instrument and doesn't bother to actually play it properly and learns to play it like a guitar. The result sounds subpar because the instruments have very different characteristics and so the playing style of one is not suitable to the other.

The instrument sounds to thin and plunky and clunky when played with a flatpick and without heavy distortion and so it completely loses the sound of the original while not bringing anything new to the table.

It's the same as a guitarist playing an acoustic like an electric, a guitarist treating a bass as simply a baritone guitar rather than a separate instrument that is played differently, or a guitarist playing Vivaldi or any of the other cliched "shred" classical pieces on a guitar verbatim.
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