#1
Guitar is definitely my main thing, but I've heard that learning piano helps a lot with understanding theory plus i like to compose music so the skills would come in handy. Anyone here play? any suggestions on books or websites to help get me started? Thanks.
#2
just take a piano class, unlike guitar there is a very solid foundation on how you're supposed to approach the fundamentals of piano in terms of efficiency and understanding
modes are a social construct
#3
I've been playing for about 8 years, the michael aaron books or james bastien books are a great place to start, but getting a teacher is better. You also need to read sheet music if you don't already
#4
A teacher is indispensable. Self-taught pianists are okay, but they miss a lot of technical instruction as a result.
#5
What are your goals as a pianist? You don't really have to be that great at playing the piano to do what you mentioned. I'm not a good pianist, but I do noodle around with it and try stuff on it, and it also helped my understanding of theory a lot.

So do you want to be able to play piano music on it, or do you just want to use it as a tool to figure stuff out and help with songwriting and understanding theory? Of course taking lessons will always help.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
I'm not looking to be great at piano and right know because of money, lessons are not an option. just want a better understand of theory and a basic knowledge of playing piano(looking for a book or website to help). maybe later I might might strive to be good at piano and take lessons but my main focus is guitar right know.
#7
If it's just the theory and songwriting side you're interested in, I agree with MaggaraMarine - no technique required, no lessons required.
Easy to teach yourself the notes, and away you go. You don't need books, and a few seconds on a website will tell you the notes.

You don't actually have to be able to play the piano - ie perform on it - to use it to investigate chords and harmony.

However, reading notation (treble and bass clef) would be a useful skill.
Last edited by jongtr at Jul 10, 2015,
#8
Piano is easier to visualize theory, to understand it, but what you want is to build your muscle memory/instinctual playing on your guitar.

On piano it's the same, and every key is a different thing you have to learn. None of this will transfer to guitar. Only the theory will, which is easy to see on piano, especially in key of C and its relatives. You can learn that in 20 minutes.

If your goal is guitar, spend your time on your guitar. There is a lot to learn that can only be learned with a guitar in your hands.
#9
Quote by jongtr
If it's just the theory and songwriting side you're interested in, I agree with MaggaraMarine - no technique required, no lessons required.
Easy to teach yourself the notes, and away you go. You don't need books, and a few seconds on a website will tell you the notes.

You don't actually have to be able to play the piano - ie perform on it - to use it to investigate chords and harmony.

However, reading notation (treble and bass clef) would be a useful skill.

Yeah.

I can play some music on piano, but that's really not what I use the piano for. I have taken some lessons (we had a mandatory piano course last year in the university I study at), but that didn't really help with my theory knowledge. I just learned to play the instrument a bit better.

I listen to songs and use the piano to help me figure out what's happening. It's a very easy instrument to visualize music theory.


Maybe get a music theory book. I guess music theory books usually use sheet music to explain things, so you could use the piano to hear how the different concepts explained in the book sound like.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
Quote by fingrpikingood
Piano is easier to visualize theory, to understand it, but what you want is to build your muscle memory/instinctual playing on your guitar.

On piano it's the same, and every key is a different thing you have to learn. None of this will transfer to guitar. Only the theory will, which is easy to see on piano, especially in key of C and its relatives. You can learn that in 20 minutes.

If your goal is guitar, spend your time on your guitar. There is a lot to learn that can only be learned with a guitar in your hands.


yeah pretty much (I played piano before guitar).
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