#1
Hi all, I have a question to people out there who have been lucky enough to get some opening support slots for well known(ish) bands, And how you went about it... Was it because you knew somebody who knew somebody, you were friends with the band, or even contacting the band or their management?

I've contacted bands/management before and they never seem to respond, I am not big headed or anything but I feel that my band could open for a well known band and do a decent job (We don't care about the cash, just the experience. We would play for free)

The reason am asking this is because my band is having a fresh start and starting to write new material now and feel we are getting better and better all the time and would love to get some opening slots to get our name out there!

Could anyone give me any advice on this?


Thanks in advance

Heaven086
#2
It`s tough. They get really inundated with a LOT of emails from bands. Be the exception, go to gigs and speak to the people in the know and who pull the strings. So many bands waste this opportunity when gigging. A gig is about playing and performing but also making new contacts so your next gig can be a bigger and better one and you can get some radio exposure, etc.

Be yourself but be friendly and outgoing. Build up a list of friends who are in the industry and if your band is really good they will definitely help you out.
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#3
Keep playing shows. Record them, and scrutinise the recordings to eliminate flaws. Not just bum notes, but to make sure you catch any dead time. What do you do while people check tuning, or the drummer busts a skin or cracks a cymbal? Refine your social media presence. Contact local internet radio shows - there must be at least one that concentrates on unsigned acts - and send them your stuff. A quality demo/EP/album if you can fund it. Invite the DJ to shows - did I mention you should keep playing shows? - ask them for feedback. Act on it.

This is all part of getting your name 'out there'. Make contacts. Make contacts with THEIR contacts. keep going.

Oh, and if you offer to play a big show free... that does kinda seem like you're not really serious.
#4
You filthy slot.
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#5
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Keep playing shows. Record them, and scrutinise the recordings to eliminate flaws. Not just bum notes, but to make sure you catch any dead time. What do you do while people check tuning, or the drummer busts a skin or cracks a cymbal? Refine your social media presence. Contact local internet radio shows - there must be at least one that concentrates on unsigned acts - and send them your stuff. A quality demo/EP/album if you can fund it. Invite the DJ to shows - did I mention you should keep playing shows? - ask them for feedback. Act on it.

This is all part of getting your name 'out there'. Make contacts. Make contacts with THEIR contacts. keep going.

Oh, and if you offer to play a big show free... that does kinda seem like you're not really serious.


Hey man, no I am really serious about our music! I just feel that I love music so much I don't care about the cash as that what a lot of people are all about! obviously down the line if we got frequent slots that's when I would expect some cash at least for travel etc..
#6
Quote by heaven086
Hey man, no I am really serious about our music! I just feel that I love music so much I don't care about the cash as that what a lot of people are all about! obviously down the line if we got frequent slots that's when I would expect some cash at least for travel etc..

It's more about professionalism than anything else. Saying "we'll do it for free" can be construed as "we think our material and performance are worth $0.00".
You have to be serious about the business as well as the music.
#7
the band probably has nothing to do with what local artists get on the bill, contact the whoever is booking/promoting the show (whether it's the venue or some other agency or whatever). tell them you will promote the show & bring a crowd.
#8
1. Be good
2. Have good recordings/image/etc
3. Contact the VENUE months in advance and ask if you can be on the show. The headliners have little to no input on the local acts.


I've played many shows with well-known bands, so I know what I'm talking about.
Check out my band Disturbed
#9
Quote by StewieSwan
1. Be good
2. Have good recordings/image/etc
3. Contact the VENUE months in advance and ask if you can be on the show. The headliners have little to no input on the local acts.


I've played many shows with well-known bands, so I know what I'm talking about.

Hi mate, how do you usually approach the venue? as a lot of the venues that are just for gigs don't usually open during the day, do you phone them up or just attempt to get in the venue to speak to someone?
#10
Quote by heaven086
Hi mate, how do you usually approach the venue? as a lot of the venues that are just for gigs don't usually open during the day, do you phone them up or just attempt to get in the venue to speak to someone?

Well you could go while they're open. Or google them and find a website, Facebook account or whatever.
#11
Quote by heaven086
Hi mate, how do you usually approach the venue? as a lot of the venues that are just for gigs don't usually open during the day, do you phone them up or just attempt to get in the venue to speak to someone?



Personally, the route we've always taken is to go to local shows and make friends with the staff of the venues. Come see their bands and shit like that, add them on facebook, etc. Then when a show comes through that you really want, just ask them (far in advance). It doesn't really work that way for really large venues, though.
Check out my band Disturbed