#1
I think that the solo is played in blues pentatonic C#minor scale (which is parallel minor of Emajor scale).

Correct me if I'm wrong about this

And can someone please explain chords progression in this song

Thank you
#2
^So then it's E major, the tune is in a major key.

Figure out what the chords are and give them all Roman numerals in E major:

E:I

F#m: II

and so on. The logic behind the chord progression will become a little clearer.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#4
The song is in E major, and the chords (for the main section) are:

|E - - B/D#|C#m - A - |

- IOW, the classic I-V-vi-IV loop (you've heard it countless times before), although in this case the V (B) is delayed and has a D# bass, so it's more like a passing chord on beat 4.

Scale-wise, then it's all E major, and while the guitar fills and (rudimentary) solo are largely E major pent (same notes as C#minor pent, so you're right), there's an A in there too. Most of it seems to be based on the chord tones. (E and C#m each contain 3 of the pent notes.)
IOW, strum the chords in the right position, embellish with occasional extra notes from the pent (along with the A resolving down to G#) and you pretty much have it. Standard stuff in this kind of "country-rock" style. (Not really very bluesy - more gospel/soul in vibe.)

In terms of the pent (C#m / E maj) the only difference is what you call it. The key happens to be E here - so best to call it "E major pent" - but it needn't make any difference to how you play. Adding the blue note (G) will work, at least if bent up to G#.

One thing that makes it worth understanding the difference is that minor pent (from keynote) = "blues"; and major pent (from keynote) = "gospel/soul/country".
If you wanted to make this tune bluesy, you'd use E minor pent (because the key is E) - but IMO that wouldn't sound right. It's certainly not how the Stones play it.
#5
The traditional approach is to emphasize chord tones rhythmically. If you play the D# during the E chord, it's going to sound a little "out", even though the note is in the key and scale.

The basic pentatonic patterns for each chord are great for making these kind of melodies. Relative to the root of the chord: 1 2 3 5 6 on major chords (including dominants), and 1 3 4 5 7 on minor chords. This is boilerplate, basic melody stuff, but it's a great place to start from.

I don't want to call these separate scales, because you're never leaving the original key, but the pattern is the same. You can analyze them as arpeggios, if for some reason you have to give an analysis of "Beast of Burden".
#6
Quote by jongtr


In terms of the pent (C#m / E maj) the only difference is what you call it.


While overall I agree with your analysis, this is inaccurate.

They have the same notes, but those notes have completely different functions. They feel very different because their relationships to the tonic are different.

Saying that "the only difference is what you call it" encourages lazy thinking - oh, all these notes are just interchangeable safe notes. It's important for young musicians to learn that it's not the note NAME that matters, but rather it's relationship to the tonic and chord tones.
#7
Yeah, big time. C#m will NEVER be E major except on paper, out of order.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#8
Just to clarify...

When I said "the only difference is what you call it", I meant within a specific tonal context (the one under discussion).
I.e, if you are in E major, then whether you call the scale you use "E major pent" or "C# minor pent" makes no difference. It's going to sound like E major pent whatever you do.
If you target C#, it will sound different from targeting E, but only like targeting the 6th rather than the tonic.
I'd still say "it needn't make any difference to how you play", because the notes are all the same, and all will work fine on all the chords in question.

Of course, it's good to know how the scale is working - at least that (in this context) E is your tonic and not C#. I'm opposed to "lazy thinking" in that sense.
But personally I'd be more concerned with the principle of targeting chord tones then the names of scale patterns.

Still, I will say I don't like the way many beginners seem to think - or be taught - in terms of minor pentatonics, without understanding the equally (if not more) important role of major pent. I just didn't think it was a huge issue here.

The scale here is E major, or E major pentatonic. Calling it "C# minor" is wrong, for reasons which should be obvious. But a solo played by someone who is thinking "C# minor pent" is not going to sound wrong. (Unless it means too much targeting of C#, and even that will just sound slightly odd, not "wrong". Might even sound better than targeting E or other chord tones...)
#9
^Well, I mean, it makes a difference because one of them is wrong and misleading. As you've said.

If they're thinking C#m pentatonic, then no, the solo won't sound that much different. But it's misleading to the uninformed and whatnot.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp