#1
Hoi, so the topic sheds some light on the subject. I've made a long intro myself, similar to Anastasia's. However, I've been thinking of making a similar acoustic intro. For this though, I would have to determine the chords of the notes I play.

My intro is a diverse "adventure" which has many different parts. I'm not going to show my creation here but I will paste a part of Anastasia here:

-----13-12-13-10-13-12-13---|-----13-12-13-10-13-12-13---|
--10------------------------|--10------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|

How am I to form a chord from something like this? I've tried to just go through some chords by moving the notes here and there and then choosing the chord that sounds the closest and the most fitting.

In the acoustic intro of Anastasia, he's doing the same thing as here but with chords. The intro I made is like 50 seconds longs so I wouldn't make an exact same repition in chords because that would make the intro almost 2 minutes long... So yeah lol. How should I approach something like this. Take the part I pasted here. I want to form a chord of it. How should I start doing that. I'll need to know the notes but how should I start looking for the corresponding chords?
#2
^You have three main notes, A D and F.

Those notes should probably all be chord tones:

1, 3, b3, 5, b5, 7, b7 9(sus2), b9, #9, 11(sus4), #11, 13, b13

So, some obvious answers (keeping the extensions and altered chords out of the game) would be:

F, Dm, Bbmaj7.

But the possibilities are literally endless. And that's just if you only make them chord tones AND use tertian harmony.

You can sub out chords, or reharmonize, or both, or both in reverse! Literally endless.

But you're probably looking for Dm.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#4
You don't make one chord to fit all the notes. Make a profession that is agreeable with all the notes. The notes fit well in Am or Dm, so some choices are:

Am / Am / F / G
F / F / Am / Am
Bb / Bb / Dm / Dm
Dm / Dm / G / G
Dm / C / Bb / C
Dm / Am/ C / G

etc
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#5
First I would find the key. Then look at the melody and try to find chords that have the same notes as the melody. Also use your ears. Try to hear bass notes that would fit the melody. If you write the melody and the bassline, you already have two chord tones figured out. That should help a lot at figuring out what chords to play.

Of course it doesn't have to be done this way (melody + bassline). This is just one approach.

But the melody you posted (I know it's not your own melody) has so many different options. To me that melody only suggests one chord that is D minor. Look at the notes. It has A, F, E and D in it. The E could be treated as a non-chord tone, and the rest of the notes are part of the D minor chord. But this doesn't mean D minor is the only way to harmonize the melody. That would just be the most obvious solution.

I would use my ears and decide how long I would want one chord to last. Think about the rhythm. Is it two notes per chord (that may be pretty fast)? Four notes per chord? Maybe one chord per bar?

Try to hear something over it. If it's one chord per bar, you could start with a Dm chord. It's in the key of Dm so Dm is a good chord to start with (but of course not the only option). Try to hear where the bass should go next. The next chord could be Bb major. But you could just experiment by playing single notes over the melody. You could also try non-diatonic stuff. For example playing a B natural over this wouldn't sound bad at all. You could try the basic James Bond thing - keep playing the Dm chord throughout the progression and just change the bass note like D Bb B Bb or whatever (pretty similar as in Hangar 18 by Megadeth).

But yeah, there are so many things you could do with that melody. Just experiment.

Also, remember that not every note in the melody needs to be part of the triads you play. Sometimes that creates cool sounds when the melody emphasizes the 7th, 9th, 11th and 13th (of the chord) instead of the basic root, third and fifth.


The most obvious way to harmonize a melody would be to look at the notes in the melody and find chords that have the same notes as in the melody. For example if my melody went like C E G F D B C, the most obvious way to harmonize it would be C major (over the first three notes) G7 (over the next three notes) C major (over the last note). But depending on the rhythm, there would be many different options.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
Quote by Billie_J


-----13-12-13-10-13-12-13---|-----13-12-13-10-13-12-13---|
--10------------------------|--10------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|




That is... A-F-E-F-D-F-E-F :|| .

I could see it in a generic vi-IVmaj7-Imaj7 in F major.
Or III-V7add13-i in D minor.
Or even VImaj7-III4/nat3-I or vi (Bbmaj7 Fmaj7/C F or Dm).
Or even more IIImaj7-VImaj7-i if F = I.

The possibilities are pretty large haha. But you have a strong focus on F, so the harmonies would most commonly tend to F major or its relative minor, D minor.

By the way, what do you mean by Anastasia? Do you mean the movie and the song "Once Upon a December"? (Love it.)
#7
Anastasia is the name of the song :P

But yeah, I'm going to see if I can find the chords.
Last edited by Billie_J at Jul 12, 2015,
#8
The chords in Anastasia (behind that part) are Dm and Bb(maj7). You could see Bbmaj7 as a Dm with a different bass note (Bb).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
^Sweet! Didn't even know the song came to the same conclusion.

Dunno if I should be proud of my earlier post or critical of predictable harmonizing.

Probably both
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#10
I'm going to write riff chords in concert tuning, being hard of transposing... transpose 1/2-step up, Slash is tuned 1/2-step down.

C#m | | A | | F#7 | | B | | G#7/B# | | C#m | |
A G# |  B F# | A E | D#7 |

How it works in context:

-----13-12-13-10-13-12-13---|-----13-12-13-10-13-12-13---|
--10------------------------|--10------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
C#m

-----13-12-13-10-13-12-13---|-----13-12-13-10-13-12-13---|
--11------------------------|--11------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
A

-----15-13-15-12-15-13-15---|-----15-13-15-12-15-13-15---|
--12------------------------|--12------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
F#7

-----15-12-15-12-15-13-15---|-----15-12-15-12-15-13-15---|
--13------------------------|--13------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
B

-----17-15-17----17-13-15---|-----17-15-17----17-13-15---|
--14----------17------------|--14----------17------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
G#/B#

-----17----17----17----17---|-----17----17----17----17---|
--15----18----17----18------|--15----18----17----18------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
C#m

-----18-17-18----17-15-17---|-----15-14-15----15-14-15---|
--15----------14------------|--13----------12------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
----------------------------|----------------------------|
A G# B F#

-----13-12-13----13-12-13---|----12-11-12---12-11-12---|
--11----------10------------|--9----------9------------|
----------------------------|--------------------------|
----------------------------|--------------------------|
----------------------------|--------------------------|
----------------------------|--------------------------|
A E D#7
Last edited by NeoMvsEu at Jul 12, 2015,
#11
Thank God I'm getting my theory book this week. I managed to form chords by moving the notes together. But I have no idea about their names..
#13
The short answer is to try bass notes under the melody until you find the one that makes it sound interesting.

The long answer is to learn, listen, and play enough that you don't have to guess at which chord to use.

Learning theory will help a lot, since you'll gain the knowledge of what all chords are possible given some notes. Just as important, you'll also figure out when certain notes are providing color rather than chord tones.