#1
I want to train myself to have a feel for music and sight reading, how would you guys time this in your head when playing if you have no backing track and just metrenome?
#2
This is just me, but:


Line 1 = melody note
Line 2 = counting in sixteenths
Line 3 = what I'd count.

1 e + a is pronounced "one e and uh".

A                           D D -                     FD Bb
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a 1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a  4 e + a
1       2       3       4   + a 1       2       3   + a  4
#3
^Literal perfect answer right here.

If you look at the notation, the beaming of the notes is actually split into the beats for you. Gotta love it when the TAB's are beamed the right way.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#4
Thanks! That really helped! And what BPM do you usually start your metronome at when trying to practice things like these?

And one more question. If I had a quintuplet of 32nds

would it still be easier to count as 16ths because that quintuplet is literally the same length as (1 e)?
Last edited by Pocari Sweater at Jul 14, 2015,
#5
count that however it comes easiest to you, i'd split it into a set of 2 demisemiquavers and a triplet

hard to really assign an enunciation for such a brisk set so it's a "whatever" works affair

for me, i use te's (subdiv of 2), ti te ta's (4), and lali's (3) for everything
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#7
Unless you can play quintuplets without thinking, you won't "feel" it right.

That quintuplet takes the space of an eight note. Set the metronome to click, and practice saying and playing:

HIP-PO-POT-A-MUS

To the click. That's a quintuplet. Then replace that word with 1 2 3 4 5, and then with nothing at all, and you're golden.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#9
Presented with quintuplet 32nds, I'd probably start the metronome at 60bpm, as well as spend time with the recording to get the feel. And it's not exactly unusual for clumsy transcriptions/tabs to get the rhythm wrong when it's not a straightforward subdivision (ie, ritardando, rubato), so you might check the recording to make sure it's straight quintuplets rather than a phrase that plays with the rhythm.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jul 14, 2015,
#10
^Yep. Just remember to keep the notes evenly spaced and to go slow. Patience and discipline always.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#11
Looks more like a trill than an actual 32nd quintuplet to me. I would't try to count that particular rhythm that accurately. The point is to play a 5 note trill during an eighth note. It may help to learn the rhythm without the trill first. Just play the first note of the trill as an 8th note. Once you've got that down, add the trill.
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#12
Do you guys sometimes just let guitar pro play the track but count instead of play when you set the BPM at 50% or lower just train counting?
#13
does anybody in MT even use guitarpro?
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#14
Quote by Hail
does anybody in MT even use guitarpro?


I transcribe a lot for the site, and although it's mostly chord charts, I've used GP5, GP6Lite, and TuxGuitar (open source stuff). It's nice to write out drum and band ideas, but sometimes it's easier to stick with the classic pencil, paper, and staff paper!

Quote by Pocari Sweater
Do you guys sometimes just let guitar pro play the track but count instead of play when you set the BPM at 50% or lower just train counting?


Despite having said that, I started off with years of piano, so I've not needed to stop and count like that. But that's a good idea. It gives you a virtual MIDI-band and all the flexibility to adjust the tempo ^^

What may help the most is to mute one track, then another on top of that, until all that's left is a drum track. (Assuming that it's a multi-track file.) Just a thought.