#1
So, lately I have a hard on for some headless basses, but these are quite rare at a fair price(with overseas shipping). The one I really want is the Ibanez axstar but I could go with Steinberger spirit or a hohner b2a and just get a string adapter. On the other hand I gassed for a bass vi for over a year now. I know technically it is a bass but does it have enough low end to keep the bass in a band?
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#2
why do you need a gimmick instrument?
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#3
Quote by Hail
why do you need a gimmick instrument?


First of all the headless bass is for comfort reasons, the bass vi is to accompany the guitar player and give the band a fuller sound.

Secondly, why not?
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#4
Get whichever one you want in your stable more. Sounds like you want them for pretty different reasons, so go for the one you think you'll get the most use out of I guess.
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#5
I Am too indecisive

I consulted my guitarist and he suggested I get the bass vi. This man hasn't given me a bad piece of advice so far so think I'm gonna go with that. Anyone got experience with these?
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
Last edited by Guitar0player at Jul 14, 2015,
#6
A bass VI is what you make of it. It really depends more on your amp and cabinet whether you're going to get bass out of it. If you're going to use it as a sort of baritone instrument, there are better out there.

A full-scale headless bass will be difficult to find largely because they're not particularly popular. I personally think they're fine, and a good lightweight alternative, but you should investigate the reasons *why* they're not particularly popular.

To re-state Hail's question, why, in particular, do you want either instrument. What will they do for you that you can't get from either a standard bass or from a baritone/longer scale guitar? There are baritones with scales up to 30", and the Bass VI is essentially the same guitar and scale.
#7
Quote by dspellman
A bass VI is what you make of it. It really depends more on your amp and cabinet whether you're going to get bass out of it. If you're going to use it as a sort of baritone instrument, there are better out there.

A full-scale headless bass will be difficult to find largely because they're not particularly popular. I personally think they're fine, and a good lightweight alternative, but you should investigate the reasons *why* they're not particularly popular.

To re-state Hail's question, why, in particular, do you want either instrument. What will they do for you that you can't get from either a standard bass or from a baritone/longer scale guitar? There are baritones with scales up to 30", and the Bass VI is essentially the same guitar and scale.


Well, when you put it like that I understand where the lack of popularity towards headless instruments are. So getting one over a bass VI would be a bit pointless, the bass VI offers a lot more....for somewhat less actually....

As for that, I generally play bass through a ZOOM B3(Sans amp Bass driver patch always on) into a Markbass amp with a 4x10 on a 1x15. When at home I play through Guitar Rig into my headphones. The idea behind getting one is to create a fuller sound between me and the guitar player. That done by having more notes on the higher register with greater accessibility and, to me anyways, a better sound.

Not to mention that to me it looks like one of the coolest instruments ever made and I've wanted one for close to 3 years now.

Also, I wasnt aware of any 30' baritone guitars. Do they come tuned E-e from the factory? I am aware of other companies making Bass VI like basses, notably Schecter and Eastwood.

As said, I am a bass player and I intend to use the Bass VI as a bass in a band. Just with two higher strings.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#8
at the end of the day your best bet would be going for a regular 6 string and tuning up. it might be harder to play, but ultimately you'll be getting a fuller sound in the bass ranges

up to you though it just seems like you have a budget and you're thinking "what cool toy can i get right now" rather than "what will accomplish my goal the best and increase my skills as a player"

the issue when you get into "gimmicks" is that you typically lose quality in other areas (per budget dollar) in the low-mid price range. if you buy, say, a $1000 headless, it can often be considered a $800 bass with a $200 add-on for the cool feature. when you're shopping with a limited price range, it's important to consider that every extra selling point is potentially deteriorating the quality in terms of technology, longevity, wood choice, etc.


that being said, i play an 8 string headless bass. i'm not knocking either option, but i wouldn't recommend going in blind, either
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#9
Quote by Hail
at the end of the day your best bet would be going for a regular 6 string and tuning up. it might be harder to play, but ultimately you'll be getting a fuller sound in the bass ranges

up to you though it just seems like you have a budget and you're thinking "what cool toy can i get right now" rather than "what will accomplish my goal the best and increase my skills as a player"

the issue when you get into "gimmicks" is that you typically lose quality in other areas (per budget dollar) in the low-mid price range. if you buy, say, a $1000 headless, it can often be considered a $800 bass with a $200 add-on for the cool feature. when you're shopping with a limited price range, it's important to consider that every extra selling point is potentially deteriorating the quality in terms of technology, longevity, wood choice, etc.


that being said, i play an 8 string headless bass. i'm not knocking either option, but i wouldn't recommend going in blind, either


That is indeed a fair point, but sadly I dont have anyway to check either options since all shops around me dont stock said instruments. Even regular 6 string basses.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#10
If you don't definitively want either of them, then I'd hold back until you have something you really want to spend your money on. Failing that, I'd get the Bass VI. It will at least open you up to some new approaches, being a whole different instrument of sorts. The headless bass is just the same instrument, with the advantage of generally being lighter (the caveat being that they're ugly as sin and often tonally challenged).
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#11
Quote by Ziphoblat
If you don't definitively want either of them, then I'd hold back until you have something you really want to spend your money on. Failing that, I'd get the Bass VI. It will at least open you up to some new approaches, being a whole different instrument of sorts. The headless bass is just the same instrument, with the advantage of generally being lighter (the caveat being that they're ugly as sin and often tonally challenged).


That's the deal, I wanted a Bass VI for close to 3 years now, the idea of the headless bass sorta came and went when I saw the Ibanez Axstar. Not to mention the Bass VI is cheaper, even the vintage modified Squier.

If I do get if I get a set of fresh strings and possibly a brand new bridge.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#12
Quote by Guitar0player


Also, I wasnt aware of any 30' baritone guitars. Do they come tuned E-e from the factory? I am aware of other companies making Bass VI like basses, notably Schecter and Eastwood.

As said, I am a bass player and I intend to use the Bass VI as a bass in a band. Just with two higher strings.


30" basses with six strings are available beyond the Bass VI, of course. This one looks like a bass:
http://www.rondomusic.com/hxb406blkquilt34.html
What they sound like depends on how you string them.

The difference between a 30" bass and a 30" baritone guitar is mostly in looks (and, of course, in how you string them). Here's a 30" that looks like a guitar:

http://www.rondomusic.com/st630eb3ts.html
http://www.rondomusic.com/harm1natashextended.html
http://www.rondomusic.com/product7643.html

And if six strings aren't enough (you could, after all, be running two up and two DOWN from a standard 4-string bass tuning if you wanted), here's an 8-string with a 30" scale:

http://www.rondomusic.com/product7844.html

As for where it's tuned -- that's up to you, innit? And, of course, it's dependent on the gauge of strings you're using.

The decision on what your 30" instrument really is depends on your role in the band.
If you're a bass player, your running mate is the drummer. You and the kick provide the bottom and the punch in the band. But bass players often want to "expand their range" and get into what the guitar players are doing. That's often fine on occasion, but if you're going to simply be a downtuned guitar, then find a bass player to take your place.

Your stated objective for the Bass VI is "to accompany the guitar player and give the band a fuller sound." That usually means "wall of mush."

There ARE bands that make do with a pair of 8-string guitars, but the ones that handle this well divide their attentions, and one plays bass lines/patterns while the other covers guitar stuff, and they trade off, sometimes several times within the same song.

Simply playing the same stuff an octave apart doesn't work well for the music, usually, but it works for their egos.
#13
Quote by dspellman
30" basses with six strings are available beyond the Bass VI, of course. This one looks like a bass:
http://www.rondomusic.com/hxb406blkquilt34.html
What they sound like depends on how you string them.


Oh, that kind of short scale 6 string. Nope, I am definitely not interested in one of these. I've played a six string like this one once. Never wanted again since. But that is just my preference....so far anyway.

Quote by dspellman

The difference between a 30" bass and a 30" baritone guitar is mostly in looks (and, of course, in how you string them). Here's a 30" that looks like a guitar:

http://www.rondomusic.com/st630eb3ts.html
http://www.rondomusic.com/harm1natashextended.html
http://www.rondomusic.com/product7643.html


Wow, these look really cool, especially the Strat and the Harmony ones. But I am pretty sure that restringing them with bass vi strings would be a bit of a hassle.


Quote by dspellman

And if six strings aren't enough (you could, after all, be running two up and two DOWN from a standard 4-string bass tuning if you wanted), here's an 8-string with a 30" scale:

http://www.rondomusic.com/product7844.html


Definitely not my cup of tea....

Quote by dspellman

As for where it's tuned -- that's up to you, innit? And, of course, it's dependent on the gauge of strings you're using.

The decision on what your 30" instrument really is depends on your role in the band.
If you're a bass player, your running mate is the drummer. You and the kick provide the bottom and the punch in the band. But bass players often want to "expand their range" and get into what the guitar players are doing. That's often fine on occasion, but if you're going to simply be a downtuned guitar, then find a bass player to take your place.


First of all, me and the guitarist dont really have a fixed position in the band. This all boils down to the fact that we dont have a keyboardist and we try to fill in the gaps ourselves. It is often that I am there solely to provied the low end growl for your typical rock sounds but also what often happens is that I play the lead melody of a specific song while the guitarist rests in the background with the drummer. At other times we try to fill in the gaps by using FX pedals.

Quote by dspellman

Your stated objective for the Bass VI is "to accompany the guitar player and give the band a fuller sound." That usually means "wall of mush."


While I am not going to disagree with you, I am not going to agree either. I am not going to pull that sort of stuff when it's not needed. Like when all I need is to play a proper bass line while the guitarist is playing a heavy riff. Not to mention that "Wall of mush" is a very subjective term in itself, at least in my opinion.

Quote by dspellman

There ARE bands that make do with a pair of 8-string guitars, but the ones that handle this well divide their attentions, and one plays bass lines/patterns while the other covers guitar stuff, and they trade off, sometimes several times within the same song.


This is pretty much what happens in our band, but on far more rare occasions. Yes, we play fairly standard hard rock but we often try to explore new sounds and soundscapes. I as a bass player by no means try to get into guitar player territory, I am trying to expand my possibilities in my current position, And as I stated previously, I simply dont like conventional 6 string bass guitars.

Quote by dspellman

Simply playing the same stuff an octave apart doesn't work well for the music, usually, but it works for their egos.


If you are talking about a bassist playing the same riff as the guitar player then you are wrong. If you are talking about being a guitar player but just playing a guitar tuned an octave lower then you are right. But as I previously stated, I play bass. Regardless of how many strings and in what configuration, I play bass.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#14
If you want it, you can afford it and you can use it then buy it.
If it will add to your music then buy it.
Any other advice can go hang.

The Bass VI gives you a lot of scope to play new things that you wouldn't have otherwise thought off with the downside being some limitation due to string spacing. They also come with guitar pickups rather than real bass pickups for the surf/tictac sound so take that into account too.

Headless basses are pretty great. They're more portable, lighter and obviously have less neck dive. If you like the way they look then they're a winner. That said, it's probably a passing fancy.

Like a thing, buy a thing.
#15
Quote by Spaz91
If you want it, you can afford it and you can use it then buy it.
If it will add to your music then buy it.
Any other advice can go hang.

The Bass VI gives you a lot of scope to play new things that you wouldn't have otherwise thought off with the downside being some limitation due to string spacing. They also come with guitar pickups rather than real bass pickups for the surf/tictac sound so take that into account too.

Headless basses are pretty great. They're more portable, lighter and obviously have less neck dive. If you like the way they look then they're a winner. That said, it's probably a passing fancy.

Like a thing, buy a thing.


Yes, yes, yes and yes. Regarding the first statement.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#16
Given that the headless bass craze of the 1980s is long over, there are not a lot of choices out there. Many of the remaining headless basses are not cheap (like those made by Status), and the cheap ones are usually not good instruments. So the question here is: How much do you really want a headless bass?

Fender's Bass VI is sort of a sui generis bass. It really does not fit into any category. If you want to play six-string bass, then there are many other (and better) choices out there. Basically; if you want a Bass VI, then you want a Bass VI and nothing else.

I think you would find that a good headless four-string bass will be much more useful than a Bass VI. But the good ones ain't cheap, so bring money.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#17
Quote by FatalGear41
Given that the headless bass craze of the 1980s is long over, there are not a lot of choices out there. Many of the remaining headless basses are not cheap (like those made by Status), and the cheap ones are usually not good instruments. So the question here is: How much do you really want a headless bass?

Fender's Bass VI is sort of a sui generis bass. It really does not fit into any category. If you want to play six-string bass, then there are many other (and better) choices out there. Basically; if you want a Bass VI, then you want a Bass VI and nothing else.

I think you would find that a good headless four-string bass will be much more useful than a Bass VI. But the good ones ain't cheap, so bring money.


Sorry dude, the headless bass ship has long sailed. I decided to get a bass vi, most likely a Squier Vintage Modified.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
Last edited by Guitar0player at Jul 17, 2015,
#18
Quote by Guitar0player
Sorry dude, the headless bass ship has long sailed. I decided to get a bass vi, most likely a Squier Vintage Modified.


That one is a pretty good bass. Just remember to string it with strings designed for the Fender Bass VI. That one is tuned like a guitar, whereas traditional six-string basses are tuned in fourths, like a four-string bass.

Post some pics when you can. We always enjoy seeing someone's new bass!
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#19
Quote by FatalGear41
That one is a pretty good bass. Just remember to string it with strings designed for the Fender Bass VI. That one is tuned like a guitar, whereas traditional six-string basses are tuned in fourths, like a four-string bass.

Post some pics when you can. We always enjoy seeing someone's new bass!


Dude...I know what a Bass VI is tuned like, that's one of the reasons I want one instead of a traditional six string bass, the other being the fact it plays like a guitar. I researched the Bass VI topic for close to 3 years now.

As for strings for the Bass VI. I've noticed quite a few prefer the La Bella flats. Thing is I dont like flatwounds and I did see La Bella selling .95 gauge roundwounds for the VI. On the other hand I saw a pack of 8 Diadarios for the Bass VI, problem is that they are .84 gauge and I heard quite a few people not liking the .84's on their VI's cos they lack bass and as a bass player that worries me.

Personally I use Elixirs cos they last long and I got sweaty hands. I dont want to replace the strings every other month and pay a lot for them to get shipped.

So, should I go with the Diadarios or the La Bellas? I must also add that I might get a new bridge and tremolo with it(the locking kind, just in case) cos I tune to D standard.


By the way I didnt show you guys the killswitch I put on my Fender Jazz:

Purple string dampener scrunchy.
Last edited by Guitar0player at Jul 17, 2015,