#1
Looking for some good practice exercises for Vibrato.

I have a decent technique and understanding of the various vibrato techniques (there are tonnes of videos on YouTube on it). The thing I can find is practice Techniques.
#2
The best way to practice techniques is to find a song that you like that uses that technique and then learn it. That is usually better than exercises. If you really want to practice vibrato with exercises then one thing I can recommend is to do so while practicing scales. For one example here is what I'm talking about with a descending E Major scale.

e|-12-11-9---------------------------|
B|---------12~~12-10-9---------------|
G|---------------------11~~11-9-8-9~~|

Fingering for the example:
4-3-1-4-2-1-3-1-1-2

The vibratos are on every fourth note and are indicated by: ( ~ ~ ).

Pick a scale you know or one you don't know and come up with your own little exercises using those notes. (I recommend C major or E major if you don't already know one.) On the topic of scales, I personally recommend three-notes per string but those that use a varied number of notes per string are fine as well.
#3
there are two major components to a vibrato:

1) pitch - i.e. not pressing too hard and detuning the note too much ( very common with beginners).

2) timing - rhythm - a bad vibrato isn't "in the pocket" - i.e. isn't on time. This is also common with beginners where they are simply shaking a note irrespective of the timing required to make it sound good. For super fast vibratos like BB KIng, this is less relevant, but for most situations it's super important that your vibrato lock into the tempo.

Satriani, Albert King, Jeff Beck and Stevie Ray Vaughan are players that have amazing control and are essentially among the best "articulation" players out there - they have great vibratos and you should spend some time working out some of their solos and melodies.

I'd suggest practicing your vibrato to a metronome and shaking the up and down motion to quarter notes, half notes, triplets, eight notes etc.
#4
Quote by wiggedy
Looking for some good practice exercises for Vibrato.

I have a decent technique and understanding of the various vibrato techniques (there are tonnes of videos on YouTube on it). The thing I can find is practice Techniques.


The video by Shaun Baxter on this site is great, contains exercises, and I suspect there's additional written exercises also (there's a pdf available).

http://www.ambaedu.com/shaun-baxter-guitar-techniques/

Shaun was my teacher, and a great friend.

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jul 15, 2015,
#6
like anything practice. vibrato is one of the most individual aspects of guitar playing and really no tow players are exactly alike. try varing degrees of vibrato as well. start with a just a small amount and move toward a wider vibrato. then mix it up as you go a long.
#7
Quote by reverb66

2) timing - rhythm - a bad vibrato isn't "in the pocket" - i.e. isn't on time. .



Probably what I need to work on the most, I have never tried breaking this down. So to play (a ½ tone vibrato with a) triplet feel do you vibrato/bend note once per beat.. on the "trip" .... counting "1, trip, let"?

For example

You would start on pitch at "1" then bend ½ tone on the "trip" and come back to pitch on the "let" then bend on "2" back to pitch on "trip" bend on "let" etc.... ?

.
Last edited by wiggedy at Jul 15, 2015,
#8
That sounds fine. It doesn't really matter how you do it exactly, the point is just to get used to doing it at different subdivisions to get a general feel for them - it's important to learn solos with good vibratos as well and to try and imitate them.

If you really hone in on the concept and pay close attention, you will get very good at it. My mistake as a beginner was always doing the vibrato too fast, which would sound awkward and off.
#9
Quote by reverb66
there are two major components to a vibrato:

1) pitch

2) timing - rhythm - a bad vibrato isn't "in the pocket" - i.e. isn't on time.


+1

I'd also say regarding the pitch, in addition to what you said, that (most of the time*) you want to be fluctuating the pitch by the same amount each time, so the vibrato sounds smooth (being in time with the vibrato will also aid the smoothness).

*in some cases you may want to start with a more gentle vibrato and gradually increase the intensity of it to increase the excitement of the piece of music. I'd say being able to do it smoothly first before trying that might be the thing.
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#10
Quote by reverb66
I'd suggest practicing your vibrato to a metronome and shaking the up and down motion to quarter notes, half notes, triplets, eight notes etc.


This is helping heaps... one of the things I need to get my playing off my current platue.

I admit I have overlooked the importance of this. I knew something was wrong but couldn't put my finger on it. I am felling much more confident now, had no idea how much this was affecting my playing.

Thanks
Last edited by wiggedy at Jul 19, 2015,
#11
Wiggedy,

Cool that you're advancing now. Vibrato is really important.

Note articulation makes a lot of difference in terms of expressiveness while playing.

Sliding accurately into or out of a note is another form of articulation that can make a big difference.

These are small things that can gradually added to your arsenal of techniques.

cheers, Jerry
#12
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Wiggedy,

Cool that you're advancing now. Vibrato is really important.

Note articulation makes a lot of difference in terms of expressiveness while playing.

Sliding accurately into or out of a note is another form of articulation that can make a big difference.

These are small things that can gradually added to your arsenal of techniques.

cheers, Jerry


Thanks Jerry, the scary thing now is I am preparing myself for my first Blues Band and I am seeing a big deficiency in my playing. So along with learning 20 songs, I need to work on a very fundamental tecnique.

.
Last edited by wiggedy at Jul 20, 2015,
#13
I had a teacher that had me play the major scales while bending each string to the next interval. Then practice vibrato once you've bent the string into pitch( of the next interval). hope that makes sense, helped me.