#1
Hi Forums

I just got a new amp, and about a month later I'm moving to a flat where I can't really play it. Hugely dissapointing.

So what headphones are best for practicing? Open or closed? It's a tube amp, if that makes a difference.

Cheers
#2
Headphones on an amp generally sound like crap. Be very careful plugging headphones into a tube amp, the amp needs to provide that specific feature or you will damage the amp and headphones. Don't plug headphones into the speaker cab connection.

I use Audio-Technica ATH-M50X based on suggestions with Peavey ReValver amp sims on the computer for quiet practice.
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#3
There's no designated headphone port, only outputs. Damn. What kind of gear do you need to hook up to a PC and use virtual amps?
#4
After you work all that out, check out Sony 7506, AKG 240, Sennheiser 280 and BeyerDynamic 770 headphones. That'll get you on the road...
#5
Quote by Rumpleskinstein
There's no designated headphone port, only outputs. Damn. What kind of gear do you need to hook up to a PC and use virtual amps?


An audio interface. 150-200$ I'd say. the rest is software. You could run it straight through an amp sim standalone.

It's much better than a cab anyway. It's like, everything you need to make virtually any guitar sound you could think of, minus the right guitar.

I've got ATH-M50s. Great headphones for the price. They really impressed me. When I first got them, I just wanted to listen to a bunch of music just to hear it through them.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Jul 15, 2015,
#6
Quote by Rumpleskinstein
There's no designated headphone port, only outputs. Damn. What kind of gear do you need to hook up to a PC and use virtual amps?

Read the stickies in the Recording forum. Loads of info there, the only difference between recording & practicing with a PC is hitting the record button.
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#7
+1 to the Audio Technica MH-50X's, extremely comfortable to wear for extended periods and sound fantastic.

If you don't want to be chained to your PC all the time, you can find a used Pod HD500/HD500x for a little bit more than the price of the interfaces fingrpikin said, and that comes with a USB connector as well-just a suggestion as I use mine through the Audio Technica's 99% of the time since, like your pending move, I'm also in an apartment where I can really use my amp itself too often (usually wait and take advantage when I know my neighbors aren't home!!!). The Pod also has a seperate input for your iPhone/MP3 player of choice to jam along with.
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#9
Quote by Rumpleskinstein
There's no designated headphone port, only outputs. Damn. What kind of gear do you need to hook up to a PC and use virtual amps?


I briefly considered this and dumped the idea, because I didn't want to haul a laptop computer around with me (along with an interface, etc.). This was, of course, before there were gizmos that attached to cell phones.

Even the phone things made little sense, however, since they're a bit more fiddly (and you have to spend a bit more to get the add-on gizmo that doesn't have issues with crosstalk between the headphones and the guitar, yada yada) and you do run down the battery on your phone while you're doing all this.

I found two alternate solutions.

One was a Korg Pandora (I actually now have several versions). The PX5D is a bit more luxurious, since it's a slightly larger size. It's close to the size of a pack of cigarettes and will easily fit in your pocket. Plug your guitar in, turn it on (AA batteries), plug in your headphones and punch up whatever you like. The Pandora Mini is even smaller and cheaper and has most of what the PX5D has.

For practice, it's fantastic because it has everything you need built in, including a slower-downer, a pitch changer, a metronome, tuner, bass line generator, drum line generator, phrase trainer, MP3 input, plus a host of amps/cabs/FX to play with and there's even a USB out to a recording input on your computer if you want to use it that way with the free recording software.

The second solution was an older Pod (XT). The "bean" version cost under $100 used back when (I'm thinking what, $75 these days?) and while it lacks a lot of the practice stuff the Pandora has and doesn't run on batteries, it's absolutely capable of outputting completely professional quality sound to a PA mixer, powered speaker, a set of recording monitors, a pair of good headphones. And yeah, there's a tuner in it.
Last edited by dspellman at Jul 16, 2015,