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#1
Anyone in the Pit have experience with it?

I know you guys are a bunch of greasy, gross teenagers who taco bell and mcdonalds on the regular so I expect not, but it can't hurt to ask

I just bought an Anova precision cooker that should be at my house on Friday, and I want to get some recipes to make bomb ass food.
#2
I'm aware of it, but it's not something that's been offered at any restaurant I've been to(and I have been to places that give you actual metal cutlery, and ceramic plates, and even an amuse bouche).
Just be careful and don't get botulism.
#3
I don't know what this means. I did work as a short order cook in a little pub for a year and a half.

You can take that for whatever you want it to.

EDIT: This was mostly indignant response to the Taco Bell comment.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
Last edited by snipelfritz at Jul 16, 2015,
#4
Haven't tried iit but I want to. Unfortunately they're bloody expensive. Not been to a restaurant that has cooked anything sous vide either, which is a shame. I hear steaks are meant to be great.
Quote by Renka
OddOneOut is an Essex S&M mistress and not a pirate or a computer program.

#5
Quote by snipelfritz
I don't know what this means. I did work as a short order cook in a little pub for a year and a half.

You can take that for whatever you want it to.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sous-vide

Basically, you get an apparatus that heats and circulates water around a container at temperatures much lower than are traditionally used for cooking and cook the food for longer periods of time. The food is kept in a plastic bag while cooking and the consistent temperature of the water allows the food to be cooked consistently throughout. Then you can sear the outside to provide contrast in the texture.



Quote by OddOneOut
Haven't tried iit but I want to. Unfortunately they're bloody expensive. Not been to a restaurant that has cooked anything sous vide either, which is a shame. I hear steaks are meant to be great.

I got the Anova precision cooker on an Amazon lightning deal for $140. It's usually $180. Still a little expensive, but I've been interested in getting one for a while, so I decided to go for it.
#8
Quote by snipelfritz
Oh shit, mouth is watering

Right?

I work at a steakhouse, and I asked my general manager if he'd ever had a sous vide steak and he said yeah it was pretty much the best steak he'd ever had. So I'm juiced.
#10
Quote by UltimateGuizar
Dunno never tried.
Is there a health risk cooking in plastic bags at high temp?
I know some plastics release toxic chemicals when heated.

Sous-vide is low temperature, slow cooking.

There are some health risks, because the temperatures can be very low(for cooking), sometimes under 60 centigrade, but most can be minimised by careful prep.
#12
Cooking food by keeping it in plastic bags for long periods of time... Is this what happened to the sandwich I kept in my bag for a few weeks once? I thought the green stuff was mould, but apparently it's just the colour a sandwich gets when it's cooked.
#13
Quote by ultimate-slash
Cooking food by keeping it in plastic bags for long periods of time... Is this what happened to the sandwich I kept in my bag for a few weeks once? I thought the green stuff was mould, but apparently it's just the colour a sandwich gets when it's cooked.

Not "cooked" but "fancy."
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#14
**** there was a top post on reddit today, sous vide steak looked ****ing greaatt

I have been craving a steak all ****ing day because of it jesus

I'm full from dinner but I still want a steak
#15
Quote by ultimate-slash
Cooking food by keeping it in plastic bags for long periods of time... Is this what happened to the sandwich I kept in my bag for a few weeks once? I thought the green stuff was mould, but apparently it's just the colour a sandwich gets when it's cooked.


Well, well, well, look who's gone all hollywood.
Mr. Fancy pants with his fancy gourmet sandwiches.
#18
Quote by UltimateGuizar at #33503937
Well, well, well, look who's gone all hollywood.
Mr. Fancy pants with his fancy gourmet sandwiches.

don't knock it until you try it, the green adds some wonderful contrast in flavour profile!
#19
Why would anyone want to cook lousy steak for a week in a bag and have a 50/50 shot at botulism when you can cook it perfectly in minutes on the grill with no food poisoning?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#20
Quote by theogonia777
Why would anyone want to cook lousy steak for a week in a bag and have a 50/50 shot at botulism when you can cook it perfectly in minutes on the grill with no food poisoning?

Why would anybody listen to you when they could just not put their ear up to a pile of shit?
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#21
Two of my friends have the cookers (one is a chef, the other one just likes buying stuff) and I've seen them use it so I guess I know how to do it in theory. probably won't ever do it myself though
cat
#22
Quote by snipelfritz
Why would anybody listen to you when they could just not put their ear up to a pile of shit?


What's the matter with you? Did you get fired again or something? Or did you realize that your shitty indie is a dead end and more trouble than it's worth?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#23
I've done it a few times, back in culinary school. The meat was ****ing delicious. Definitely worth the effort.
#24
Sous Vide steaks are the best in the world. Get your grill or a searing pan really hot, and put the steak on just long enough to get a char, but not really to cook, and then cook it to liking in the immersion circulator.

Crazy, crazy good.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#25
Quote by JustRooster
Sous Vide steaks are the best in the world. Get your grill or a searing pan really hot, and put the steak on just long enough to get a char, but not really to cook, and then cook it to liking in the immersion circulator.

Crazy, crazy good
.

Isn't that a KISS song?
#26
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Isn't that a KISS song?



I thought the only people who cared about KISS where article writers on guitar sites desperate for comments.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#27
Quote by JustRooster
I thought the only people who cared about KISS where article writers on guitar sites desperate for comments.

It's less caring and more using for a joke.


Not a good one, though.
#28
I figured, I just was hoping column writers would see this and stop writing "Holy shit, look what Gene Simmons said!" articles.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#29
I have years of sous vide experience in professional *******s. I wouldn't say it's universally awesome, but it certainly has its moments. My favorite uses were for cooking very fine emulsified sausages, such as mortadellas and mousses, and for this use it is unsurpassed.

For home use the safety hurdles are not as extreme as in high volume *******s. Always vacuum seal your meat as cold and fresh as possible, ideally in the 34F - 38F range. DO NOT SEAR THE MEAT FIRST, EVER. Once the meat comes out of the circulator have a hot pan or grill ready to sear the outsides quickly. Rest, eat.

Circulating the meat and cooling it for later use requires you to shock the meat immediately in an ice bath after removing from the circulator. This is a step that people in professional *******s sometimes half-ass and where things can become unsafe. For home use there isn't any good reason to do this so you shouldn't have to worry.

If you have any questions feel free to ask. I've written HACCP (hazard analysis) plans for the machines and have a pretty thorough understanding of their use.
#30
Quote by hemiola
I have years of sous vide experience in professional *******s. I wouldn't say it's universally awesome, but it certainly has its moments. My favorite uses were for cooking very fine emulsified sausages, such as mortadellas and mousses, and for this use it is unsurpassed.

For home use the safety hurdles are not as extreme as in high volume *******s. Always vacuum seal your meat as cold and fresh as possible, ideally in the 34F - 38F range. DO NOT SEAR THE MEAT FIRST, EVER. Once the meat comes out of the circulator have a hot pan or grill ready to sear the outsides quickly. Rest, eat.

Circulating the meat and cooling it for later use requires you to shock the meat immediately in an ice bath after removing from the circulator. This is a step that people in professional *******s sometimes half-ass and where things can become unsafe. For home use there isn't any good reason to do this so you shouldn't have to worry.

If you have any questions feel free to ask. I've written HACCP (hazard analysis) plans for the machines and have a pretty thorough understanding of their use.

How likely is it that you can get botulism through badly prepared food?

Can you successfully cook anything other than meat sous vide?
Quote by Renka
OddOneOut is an Essex S&M mistress and not a pirate or a computer program.

#31
Quote by TheChaz





I got the Anova precision cooker on an Amazon lightning deal for $140. It's usually $180. Still a little expensive, but I've been interested in getting one for a while, so I decided to go for it.

the steak looks nice. pink all the way through because it wasn't seared but instead immersed. makes sense but it's a lot of effort
#32
Quote by JustRooster at #33504105
Sous Vide steaks are the best in the world. Get your grill or a searing pan really hot, and put the steak on just long enough to get a char, but not really to cook, and then cook it to liking in the immersion circulator.

Crazy, crazy good.



Got dat backwards son, sear last.

Edit: Nvm, that dude who knows what he's actually talking about said that.
#33
Quote by OddOneOut
How likely is it that you can get botulism through badly prepared food?

Can you successfully cook anything other than meat sous vide?

You can cook vegetables and eggs I know for sure. I'm sure there are other things you could experiment with, but it would probably be inefficient to use for a lot of foods.
#34

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#35
so a slow cooker but you put it in a bag instead

sounds stupid

slow cookers are great tho, one made a stew thing with the gf and left it cooking for like a whole day, came to eat it and it was one of the best things i've ever eaten
Eat your pheasant
Drink your wine
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#36
Quote by Bladez22
so a slow cooker but you put it in a bag instead

sounds stupid

slow cookers are great tho, one made a stew thing with the gf and left it cooking for like a whole day, came to eat it and it was one of the best things i've ever eaten

no.
#37
Quote by hemiola
I have years of sous vide experience in professional *******s. I wouldn't say it's universally awesome, but it certainly has its moments. My favorite uses were for cooking very fine emulsified sausages, such as mortadellas and mousses, and for this use it is unsurpassed.

For home use the safety hurdles are not as extreme as in high volume *******s. Always vacuum seal your meat as cold and fresh as possible, ideally in the 34F - 38F range. DO NOT SEAR THE MEAT FIRST, EVER. Once the meat comes out of the circulator have a hot pan or grill ready to sear the outsides quickly. Rest, eat.

Circulating the meat and cooling it for later use requires you to shock the meat immediately in an ice bath after removing from the circulator. This is a step that people in professional *******s sometimes half-ass and where things can become unsafe. For home use there isn't any good reason to do this so you shouldn't have to worry.

If you have any questions feel free to ask. I've written HACCP (hazard analysis) plans for the machines and have a pretty thorough understanding of their use.


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#38
Yet another case where when I saw the OP and I thought there's no way anyone here will know any more about the subject than the TS and was proven wrong when an expert pops in.

Never had anything cooked sous-vide, but I see stuff about it on the internet every once in a while and it looks amazing.
#39
Quote by hemiola
I have years of sous vide experience in professional *******s. I wouldn't say it's universally awesome, but it certainly has its moments. My favorite uses were for cooking very fine emulsified sausages, such as mortadellas and mousses, and for this use it is unsurpassed.

For home use the safety hurdles are not as extreme as in high volume *******s. Always vacuum seal your meat as cold and fresh as possible, ideally in the 34F - 38F range. DO NOT SEAR THE MEAT FIRST, EVER. Once the meat comes out of the circulator have a hot pan or grill ready to sear the outsides quickly. Rest, eat.

Circulating the meat and cooling it for later use requires you to shock the meat immediately in an ice bath after removing from the circulator. This is a step that people in professional *******s sometimes half-ass and where things can become unsafe. For home use there isn't any good reason to do this so you shouldn't have to worry.

If you have any questions feel free to ask. I've written HACCP (hazard analysis) plans for the machines and have a pretty thorough understanding of their use.

Nice. I have been hearing a lot of back and forth whether or not to sear before immersing, but it seems like not searing is the right way to go.
#40
Quote by OddOneOut
How likely is it that you can get botulism through badly prepared food?

Can you successfully cook anything other than meat sous vide?

It's fairly unlikely. The food would have to be contaminated with Clostridium botulinum, which is found in soil. Certainly in England and Wales, the leading cause of botulism is actually heroin use - between 1980 and 2013, there were about 36 cases of food botulism(26 of which were linked to a single incident), with 3 deaths. In comparison, between 200 and 2013, there were 147 cases of wound botulism, with 8 deaths.

The bacteria only produces the toxin in anoxic environments, and as sous vide removes the air, this environment is present during cooking. As the cooking temperature is low, the bacteria will at least survive cooking - though they'll be minimally active at this time.

Now, if you vacuum seal the food and leave it, then the toxin can be produced, and some sous vide cooking processes can be as low as 55 Celcius, which is not high enough to denature the toxin and render it harmless. Similarly, if the bacteria survive the cooking, and the food is left to cool, the bacteria will become more active, and produce the toxin.

So the safest thing to do is to seal, cook and eat with as little time between these stages as possible, although again, the risks of contamination to begin with are low.
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