#1
Hey everyone!

I've been playing for quite some time now, and I've even built a guitar from scratch. But I've never actually had to change the pickups in one of my guitars before.

Anyway, I have an Epiphone Wilshire and have recently bought the Dimarzio Crunch Lab bridge pickup to install (I'm keeping the stock neck pickup).

Now, this may be an extremely straight forward question, but do I need to change my pickup selector switch as well? The wiring diagram for the Crunch Labs shows them connected to a 5-way selector switch, but the Wilshire currently has a 3-way.

I would imagine that it doesn't make a different and just limits my options for selecting pickups, but I don't want to dive in and find that I need to change them.

Thanks!
#2
Also just to add; the stock pickups have push-pull coil splitting. I would imagine that there's no easy was to turn the Crunch Labs into coil splitting pickups, but would I be correct in assuming that this won't have any affect and they'll just function normally the whole time? Or will there be no signal when the splitting is activated?
#3
You can still you use original switch. There's no reason why you cannot.

If you want to take advantage of the pickup's coil splitting features, it may be a good idea to buy a push-pull pot. All coil splitting does is change the way the pickup is wired from running both coils in parallel as all humbuckers do, to daisy-chaining both coils together in series. Pickups with 4 conductor wires (like the pickup you have) allow you to do this.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jul 16, 2015,
#4
You can use the 3 way switch, but with your current setup you wont be able to do coil splitting. Youd need either a push pull pot or a separate spst toggle switch for that.

to wire the pickup into you current setup, all you have to do is solder the red wire to the pickup selector, solder the green wire and shield (the messy stranded wire thats covering the red wire) to the back of a pot, and solder the black & white wires together and isolate themUsing a piece of electric tape or heat shrink=preferred).

to add single coil feature, you need the new pot or switch. solder the black and white wires to one side, and solder the other side to ground.
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#5
Quote by bustapr
You can use the 3 way switch, but with your current setup you wont be able to do coil splitting. Youd need either a push pull pot or a separate spst toggle switch for that.


The guitar already has push/pull pots for the current pickups, so would I need different ones? Thanks for letting me know about the switch
#6
You should be able to use the same pot if you desolder everything from it and then wire it up according to dimarzios diagram. Now is the perfect time to do it since you haven't wired it up yet
#7
since you're sticking to passive pickups you don't switch anything. Push pulls are very easy to work with. I made this "super tbx" tone control tonight and it made wiring a coil split look like changing a capacitor lets put it that way. 5 or so components needed and all.

the 3 way is fine no matter what diagram you go with your 3 way toggle works the way it's supposed to. Active to passive diagrams.

anyways... you're sticking to passive pickups , so you don't change anything. The push pull there's about 10 or so things it can do off the top of my head (i've wired/modded probably 100 guitars by now)

If you tin the wires coming off the pickups honestly keep the coil split. I'd go parallel since you can get away with it on such a high output pickup as the crunchlabs like 16k and dream theater isn't known for smoking hot blues licks parallel = hum cancelling by the way, harder to wire yes but totally worth it. , but if both pickups are sharing the same push pull stick to coil splitting it's impossible to get both pickups to go parallel on one push pull as much as we'd want.

the only time you ever switch potentiometer resistance is when you're going to actives or a pickup legitimately needs it. Like 500k pots don't go well with 2 wire single coils. The reason why is resistance.

500k - humbuckers
250k - single coils , tele pickups ..etc
25k - active , emgs , blackouts ..etc
resistance for a volume pot is brightness, the higher the resistance the brighter it is. But as we know turning down the volume on a guitar warms it up so don't bother tone chasing with say a 100k or whatever.. the only reason I'd swap a pot is to go up to say 1000k (1 megaton) if it's a really dark guitar.

so wiring wise..
firstly your color code, this ones extremely important
http://www.guitarelectronics.com/category/wiring_resources_guitar_wiring_diagrams.humbucker_wiring_color_codes/

the best and easiest to learn off of wiring diagrams
http://www.seymourduncan.com/support/wiring-diagrams/

and more complex stuff
http://www.guitarelectronics.com/category/wiring_resources_guitar_wiring_diagrams/


this would be your diagram , remember to use the dimarzio color code and you'll be fine. Some tips are..
tin each wire before you start
tin the soldering iron tip and make sure it's clean
Twist the black and white wires together and solder them together prior to going to the switch
besides that just use 60/40 rosin core solder and you're fine

idealistically you want to tin a contact , push the wire through the wall of solder where the wire gets stuck in the solder, pull the iron away and wait 5 seconds or until the metal hardens again.

this is what i mean by twist the wires, I have heat shrink tubing on the pickup wires but that is because i didnt want this pickup to coilsplit. Since your push pull is practically done to coil split it's just one extra solder so why not. Tin the black and white together and force them both through and just do what you're going to do anyways. But of course try to loosen the nut and washer off the pot and stabilize it somewhere before anything if you can, it's a luxury to not have to work inside the control cavity sometimes.




#8
Quote by Tallwood13
anyways... you're sticking to passive pickups , so you don't change anything. The push pull there's about 10 or so things it can do off the top of my head (i've wired/modded probably 100 guitars by now)


Thank you so much for this, it's helped massively. Do I not need to change anything about the pickup coiling/internal wiring itself if I'm coil splitting, or is this completely down how it's connected to the push/pull pot?