#1
Hi I'm having a slight problem with my guitar.

When I tune my guitar, everything is pitch perfect (pun intended) when I pick the string open, or if I strum a chord, but further up the fretboard, my two high strings go a bit flat (starts at around seventh fret). I haven't changed anything about the guitar except for rewiring my piezo and taking the preamp out, and I haven't noticed any changes on the neck or fretboard. Any ideas?

My best guess is that my strings are a bit old, or maybe something with the fretboard.

Thanks

(If you want to know: the guitar in question is a Mitchell MD-100-SCE)
#2
1) change the strings
2) if that hasn't helped, you're in trouble. Bring it to a tech to see if he can fix the intonation, but chances are your guitar has bad intonation and is therefore worthless. In that case - sell it and buy a different guitar.
#3
your intonation is off so change your strings first.

although it's an entry level guitar, it still has a compensated saddle. so if new strings don't help much then take it to a shop and get it set up. a tech can make a new saddle if the old one can't be re-ramped. when the intonation is flat, the scale length needs to be shortened.

question is why now? was it always this way and you just noticed? has something moved- neck, saddle, bridge? is the guitar damaged or coming apart at the neck heel?

anyway, change your strings first, let them settle in, and check your intonation. if no improvement then go to a shop and have it looked at.
#5
Pretty much all entry level acoustics are going to have slight intonation issues. Once you hit the 7th to 9th fret things may be a bit off. New strings and saddle adjustments may help, but an entry level acoustic is rarely going to have perfect intonation.
#6
I don't think there is much relationship between price and intonation in this age of CNC machining. The worst case I can recall is Martin, many years ago, when their measuring stick had shrunk due to age. Here's an interesting article on it and other issues from the same period:

https://reverb.com/blog/70s-martins-what-you-need-to-know

It is worth remembering that intonation in standard guitars is always a compromise, it is in the nature of the beast. While acoustics can't be adjusted as precisely as electrics, the problems aren't so evident either because that don't have the same sustain or compression.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
I don't think there is much relationship between price and intonation in this age of CNC machining. The worst case I can recall is Martin, many years ago, when their measuring stick had shrunk due to age. Here's an interesting article on it and other issues from the same period:

https://reverb.com/blog/70s-martins-what-you-need-to-know

It is worth remembering that intonation in standard guitars is always a compromise, it is in the nature of the beast. While acoustics can't be adjusted as precisely as electrics, the problems aren't so evident either because that don't have the same sustain or compression.


I agree with all that Tony says and especially the bits I've emboldened. And not only is there an inherent compromise but the act of fretting the strings also impacts on intonation.

But who gives a damn about pitch being slightly off? Not I.
#8
There are plenty of low priced acoustics with good intonation - Yamaha is very consistent for example.

NEVER buy ANY guitar with bad intonation, especially an acoustic. I've played $3000 Ovations with bad intonation, so the price does not dictate whether a particular guitar has issues. Unfortunately, stores don't filter out guitars with issues so you painstakingly have to test each guitar you plan on buying. I literally play every single note on the guitar before buying it, along with chord voicings all over the neck etc. If an acoustic guitar can't keep in tune or has intonation issues, it's a lemon.
#9
Quote by reverb66
There are plenty of low priced acoustics with good intonation - Yamaha is very consistent for example.

NEVER buy ANY guitar with bad intonation, especially an acoustic. I've played $3000 Ovations with bad intonation, so the price does not dictate whether a particular guitar has issues. Unfortunately, stores don't filter out guitars with issues so you painstakingly have to test each guitar you plan on buying. I literally play every single note on the guitar before buying it, along with chord voicings all over the neck etc. If an acoustic guitar can't keep in tune or has intonation issues, it's a lemon.
Gosh,I sure am glad somebody stopped by to lock the barn after the horse has been stolen....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 17, 2015,