#1
I've been playing guitar for a year and some change now and have played a couple solos but recently took interest in Post hardcore Rock like Pierce the Veil, Falling in Reverse & etc, Notice the solo's start off normal and increase in speed drastically. Like for the I'm not a Vampire solo which starts of steady and then increases in speed. Was wondering how to go about increasing my speed in order to play these solos for the part that increases in speed.
#2
Lots and lots of practice and some discipline. There are no shortcuts to this unless you don't mind being a sloppy guitar player.

Play the entirety of a song slow enough that you can play it without making a single mistake, (this may require you to play the song very, very slowly) and gradually increase the tempo of what you're playing and keep practicing until you no longer make any mistakes at the speed, and ramp up the speed some more. Wash rinse Repeat. Use a metronome to keep a track of what tempo you're playing at and to ensure that you're playing on time.

Focus on how well you're executing each technique used in the song and devise exercises that'll allow you to better practice and improve your execution.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jul 16, 2015,
#3
Practice, practice, practice. Playing high-speed shred is a full-time job.
#4
practice and patience. dude if you've been playing for a little over a year you can't expect to be burning off solos like that. find some easier stuff to start with and work your way up. takes time and don't ignore rhythm playing as having a good sense of rhythm helps with solos more than you might think.
#5
Th' late speed deemun Shawn Lane sez würdz:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhkbSBxPYcU&sns=em
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jul 16, 2015,
#6
Quote by monwobobbo
practice and patience. dude if you've been playing for a little over a year you can't expect to be burning off solos like that. find some easier stuff to start with and work your way up. takes time and don't ignore rhythm playing as having a good sense of rhythm helps with solos more than you might think.


This.

You wouldn't expect to be as good as Michael Jordan by only playing basketball part time for a year or so.
#7
Play to a metronome. Learn the part you want to play slowly, and practice to the metronome at a speed where you're playing as fast as you can without making a single mistake. Raise the speed of the metronome over time as you can play the part faster without messing up.
#8
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Th' late speed deemun Shawn Lane sez würdz:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhkbSBxPYcU&sns=em

I think i do agree with what he says about jumping out of the smooth progression of speed from time to time.

If nothing else, once you've learned the sequence of notes, and increased your speed a bit, going to full speed will show how far you still have to go to get it flawless(or, if you're a lazy git like me, 'good enough').

Don't be a lazy git like me, or at least be much pickier about what 'good enough' means
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#9
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Th' late speed deemun Shawn Lane sez würdz:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhkbSBxPYcU&sns=em



I might not have put it the same way as you did but it is interesting to see someone else post a link to that video. I always find myself linking that video in these discussions as he makes a point that you usually don't see.

I didn't read the entire thread but I'm sure there have been plenty of people telling the OP to PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE and SLOW SLOW A-LITTLE-LESS-SLOW ETC ETC.
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#10
Funny thing is, I'm no speedster myself, but what speed I DO have was developed precisely that way.

...on a cello, long before I had even heard one note of Shawn's wonderful playing.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#11
Quote by monwobobbo
practice and patience. dude if you've been playing for a little over a year you can't expect to be burning off solos like that. find some easier stuff to start with and work your way up. takes time and don't ignore rhythm playing as having a good sense of rhythm helps with solos more than you might think.


I, and most of my friends, were burning off solos after a year - you just need to practice several hours per day.
#12
Worry about cleanliness, speed will follow.

What I strongly advise against is prioritising shred gimmicks before you have a solid foundation. I know more than one person who learned sweep picking very early on, and whilst they were very good at sweeping it was all they could do. Their downpicking, muting, even just simple timing was awful. They had spent a significant portion of their practice learning a party trick instead of getting their basic technique up to scratch.
#13
Speed to me is one of the hardest, yet also one of the easiest "techniques" to develop. For me and many others speed just comes naturally over time. The longer you've been playing any instrument and the more you practice the appropriate music, the easier all aspects of playing become. Your speed increases when your playing becomes more effortless. Nothing you play when you first start the instrument is effortless, and yet so many beginners try and chase this ludicrous idea of playing at lightning speeds, even though everything about their instrument is still so foreign to them.

I can't tell beginners to stop trying to play fast because it's not my place to tell them that, it's something I feel they learn on their own. The best I can do is say that there are much more important things than speed. You can isolate and practice speed, but if you play the appropriate music and you continue to challenge (recognize a challenge and the impossible) yourself it will come very gradually over time. I could really go on and on about this topic. I feel enough good advice has been given already in this thread. You'll find your own way, we all do.
#14
I have been working on the enter sandman solo for the past three days. Still cannot play it up to speed. I have noticed once I have it in memory is when I start picking up speed.
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#15
I, and most of my friends, were burning off solos after a year - you just need to practice several hours per day.[/QUOTE

ok if you say so. big difference between practicing someone elses solo for hours on end and actually being able to do something even remotely original, two diffeent things. how were your rhythm skills? not saying it can't be done just that it isn't a reasonable expectation. now be honest were you playing fast and cleanly or just slopping out a bunch of fast notes. i'd be willing to bet slop. hey i was young once and did all the same crap. thought i was fast and awesome but it was sloppy and covered by a ton of distortion (and thios was before high gain amps)
#16
Quote by tysona23
I have been working on the enter sandman solo for the past three days. Still cannot play it up to speed. I have noticed once I have it in memory is when I start picking up speed.


yeah not having to think about it is where you pick up the speed. as long as you have to think about what the next note is you'll never be able to play fast and smooth.
#17
Quote by vayne92
Speed to me is one of the hardest, yet also one of the easiest "techniques" to develop.


I agree with this. Speed is not only related to technique, but also to discipline and your ego. During my first few years of playing i was held back because of the later two, even if we are musicians that don't strive for speed for the sake of playing fast, we still want it to make our way of expressing ourselves effortless. We have a competitive nature in us, even if we are not competitive in our personalities. During those years i would see people playing better than me (not only in regards to speed, but other areas as well) and i would get frustrated because i wasn't there yet.

This is were discipline and ego comes in.

You can get there, with time and discipline. You didn't know how to crawl when you were a baby, you learned it over time. You didn't know how to walk when you crawled, you learned that over time. You didn't know how to run when you started walking, that came over time.

If you start working on something, you can always get faster, but you need to take it one step at a time and allow yourself the time to grow. Maybe you need to start slower than others, maybe you can start at a faster tempo than others. Maybe you can increase the tempo by 10bpm at a time, maybe you can only increase the bpm by 1 each time. 1 bpm is still progress. Going from 60 to 61bpm is still progress. With time those 60 bpm will grow to 61, then to 62, eventually to 70, 80, 100, 120 etc. Things take time, and you won't get there any faster trying to skip a stage in your development.

Your ego is one of the most important things to keep in check, not only in regards to building your speed, but anything in regards to guitar, or life for that matter. If you know that you can only play a section perfectly at 60bpm, work on it there, don't play it at 65 and think it is "good enough". You are where you are on your path of progress, and should not sacrifice the quality of your playing for getting a bit faster. This happens in other areas too, i still have to check my ego often despite having played for many years and gone to school for music. When i get in a situation like that i write down what it is i don't know or what i need to work on, and i go do it. Your ego can be a really big enemy in regards to progress, it can tell you that you are crap or that you are better than you are, it is very rarely honest with you.

As Vayne said though, speed is not really the important thing here. If you can control your ego and develop discipline, speed will grow naturally as you practice other things. The best thing is to focus on playing things well and properly, adjusting the tempo needed to do that. ( I have things i play at 60 bpm half-notes, because it is not a matter of building speed, it is a matter of building control and habit). Forget about the speed and make sure you get things down well, if you can increase the metronome do it, but don't let the metronome be your primary goal.
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#18
Quote by Sickz

You didn't know how to crawl when you were a baby, you learned it over time. You didn't know how to walk when you crawled, you learned that over time. You didn't know how to run when you started walking, that came over time.


I don't have kids but I was under the impression that when babies learn to walk, what they do at the start is actually arguably closer to running than walking. The controlled walking comes later.

Which does kind of call into question the "You have to learn to walk before you can run" argument which is so often used.
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#19
Quote by Dave_Mc
I don't have kids but I was under the impression that when babies learn to walk, what they do at the start is actually arguably closer to running than walking. The controlled walking comes later.

Which does kind of call into question the "You have to learn to walk before you can run" argument which is so often used.


I don't have kids either, but my niece is currently learning to walk and she is trying to stand up and walk slowly. I don't know if that is how all kids do it, my point was simply for arguing my point that you have to take everything one step at a time and that you don't go from playing at 40bpm to 160bpm directly, you have all the steps in between as well.

I honestly believe though that many people can/could achieve the speed they desire if they would just drop the ego and be realistic with themselves. Many of my students when they first come to me seem to be in such a hurry to play fast that they sacrifice the quality of their playing, becoming very sloppy players in the process.

Just my experience.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#20
yeah probably

on the other hand, you can go too slowly as well, and go more slowly than you need to. that can demoralise people unnecessarily and make them want to quit. what you call "ego" I'd call "wanting to learn".

I also find that in my experience, a lot of the people with a bit of a spark actually don't want to go really ploddingly/boringly and do want to jump the gun a bit. And conversely some of the people who want to force them to plod don't have that spark.



(yeah i'm sloppy as hell )
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Last edited by Dave_Mc at Jul 18, 2015,
#21
Quote by Dave_Mc


on the other hand, you can go too slowly as well, and go more slowly than you need to.


Absolutely. I think you should practice at the highest possible tempo you can still play the thing you are working on and that you are still relaxed. There is nothing wrong with testing out the waters and going above your speed limit every now and then, that is how you discover how much you have left to go. Although i will argue some things should not be practiced fast at all, kind of like Tai Chi or Yoga some things are best done slowly just to create very strong habits in your playing that will later translate into your normal playing.

what you call "ego" I'd call "wanting to learn".


I think ego and wanting to learn is very different. Wanting to learn is good, that is fine. The ego part to me is the equivalant to a person that has never driven a car before trying to get through a race track at 120km/h, or a person that has never worked out before trying to benchpress 200kg. The ego is thinking you can do something that will more likely hurt your playing than help it, for example forcing yourself to play at 120bpm when you can't play accurately or relaxed at 70, and making that the way you practice. You will tense up, you will make lots of mistakes and you won't make any progress.

The spark of "wanting to learn" doesn't only need to be fueled by speed. Learning new tunes, chords, concepts, learning something by ear, listening to a new record etc. Everything fuels the fire, i'm just saying that building the wall one brick at a time is a good idea, and adding in a bit of burst practice as well.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#22
When going for speed, it's important to remember that 90% accuracy is garbage. There's no point at all in increasing speed if it costs accuracy. Moving one's hands quickly is not a challenge, it's doing so accurately that should be sought.
#23
Quote by Dave_Mc
I don't have kids but I was under the impression that when babies learn to walk, what they do at the start is actually arguably closer to running than walking. The controlled walking comes later.

Which does kind of call into question the "You have to learn to walk before you can run" argument which is so often used.


stumbling forward kinda fast really isn't running per se more like practice for being really drunk the idea still works for this though. playing fast really sloppy isn't hard at all, but like walking or running getting from point A to B successfully and with out falling on your ass isn't. the 2 big differences between playing fast and sloppy and babies walking is that you can't cover a babies feet with a ton of distortion to mask what it's doing and no one will think shit sloppy playing is cute.
#24
^ true, but it's not really walking either.

Quote by Sickz
Absolutely. I think you should practice at the highest possible tempo you can still play the thing you are working on and that you are still relaxed. There is nothing wrong with testing out the waters and going above your speed limit every now and then, that is how you discover how much you have left to go. Although i will argue some things should not be practiced fast at all, kind of like Tai Chi or Yoga some things are best done slowly just to create very strong habits in your playing that will later translate into your normal playing.



I think ego and wanting to learn is very different. Wanting to learn is good, that is fine. The ego part to me is the equivalant to a person that has never driven a car before trying to get through a race track at 120km/h, or a person that has never worked out before trying to benchpress 200kg. The ego is thinking you can do something that will more likely hurt your playing than help it, for example forcing yourself to play at 120bpm when you can't play accurately or relaxed at 70, and making that the way you practice. You will tense up, you will make lots of mistakes and you won't make any progress.

The spark of "wanting to learn" doesn't only need to be fueled by speed. Learning new tunes, chords, concepts, learning something by ear, listening to a new record etc. Everything fuels the fire, i'm just saying that building the wall one brick at a time is a good idea, and adding in a bit of burst practice as well.


agreed
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#25
Thx to all those who commented , i now know as a young guitarist i must take my time and be more concerned about accuracy to perfection at certain speeds, and that a metronome never hurts. Luckily i'm still young enough and can practice for several hours on end with out a care in the world . Again thank you guys.