#1
First off, this is the first time I've ever tried heavier strings. I play heavy stuff in drop C and B. I recently bought some Ernie Ball 2727 11-54 (11.15.22p.30.42.54) cobalt beefy slinky, guitar strings for a Yamaha electric guitar, I don't even know what kind of guitar it is man I got it for my birthday years ago. All I know is its black with a gold bridge and tuning keys. Anyway I'm restringing it, the 54 tunes up to E standard like it should, but the 42 also tunes up to E? It won't tune to standard A. Is that how these strings work or an I doing something stupidly wrong? Like I said I'm new to this changing gauge of strings stuff. I was using super light .009 nickel wound before.

Found out is a Yamaha ERG121-C2BP. Only a cheap starter thing.
Last edited by mrapexxx at Jul 17, 2015,
#2
Quote by mrapexxx
First off, this is the first time I've ever tried heavier strings. I play heavy stuff in drop C and B. I recently bought some Ernie Ball 2727 11-54 (11.15.22p.30.42.54) cobalt beefy slinky, guitar strings for a Yamaha electric guitar, I don't even know what kind of guitar it is man I got it for my birthday years ago. All I know is its black with a gold bridge and tuning keys. Anyway I'm restringing it, the 54 tunes up to E standard like it should, but the 42 also tunes up to E? It won't tune to standard A. Is that how these strings work or an I doing something stupidly wrong? Like I said I'm new to this changing gauge of strings stuff. I was using super light .009 nickel wound before.

Found out is a Yamaha ERG121-C2BP. Only a cheap starter thing.


Not sure what you mean here. You turn the tuner up to go up in pitch, down to go down in pitch. Keep turning in the direction needed to get to the desired pitch, LOL. You can tune any string to any pitch on the scale.

Anyway, you're introducing a drastic change to your guitar by going from soggy spaghetti noodles (.009 gauge set) to much heavier strings. Don't expect it to just tune up and be fine -- it'll require some setup and adjustment. How you were ever playing in drop B with those light strings is beyond me... In my experience, I've only ever found it optimal to vary my tuning by 1/2 step increments for one particular set of strings. There's no string set that will be good for E standard and still work for intense downtuning like drop B or even drop C. Either it will be extremely tight in E Standard and still quite loose in those lower tunings, or tight enough in the lower tunings and "snap your guitar neck" when you try to tune up to E standard.

If you've got a tremelo bridge then your difficulties are going to be that much more complicated. My advice is to pick one tuning (probably D Standard/Drop C or C# Standard/Drop B for your new set of strings would be ideal) and only plan on altering it up or down by 1/2 step. That's really all you can expect out of a particular set of strings.
#3
Quote by KailM
Not sure what you mean here. You turn the tuner up to go up in pitch, down to go down in pitch. Keep turning in the direction needed to get to the desired pitch, LOL. You can tune any string to any pitch on the scale.

Anyway, you're introducing a drastic change to your guitar by going from soggy spaghetti noodles (.009 gauge set) to much heavier strings. Don't expect it to just tune up and be fine -- it'll require some setup and adjustment. How you were ever playing in drop B with those light strings is beyond me... In my experience, I've only ever found it optimal to vary my tuning by 1/2 step increments for one particular set of strings. There's no string set that will be good for E standard and still work for intense downtuning like drop B or even drop C. Either it will be extremely tight in E Standard and still quite loose in those lower tunings, or tight enough in the lower tunings and "snap your guitar neck" when you try to tune up to E standard.

If you've got a tremelo bridge then your difficulties are going to be that much more complicated. My advice is to pick one tuning (probably D Standard/Drop C or C# Standard/Drop B for your new set of strings would be ideal) and only plan on altering it up or down by 1/2 step. That's really all you can expect out of a particular set of strings.



Is like I've got 2 E strings at the top. Ugh is hard to explain but basically my top 2 strings that should be E, A are both E, E. I've tried tuning it to an A but it won't go to the right tone. Is messed up.
#4
^^Do you have a tremelo bridge or a hardtail bridge? If you've got a tremelo bridge it's probably just pulling on the bridge springs (which are undoubtedly too light/not enough springs/inadequately tensioned for the heavier strings), rather than raising that string to a higher pitch. Heavier strings, when tuned to E Standard, put a lot more tension on your bridge than lighter ones do. That's why heavier strings are recommended for players who downtune -- they maintain tension where light strings tuned down that low are very floppy. Most people don't use an .11-.54 string set to tune to E Standard -- it's quite a lot of tension. That's closer to what I'd consider ideal for D Standard; a whole step lower.
Last edited by KailM at Jul 17, 2015,
#5
You could always just block the tremolo. If you don't use the whammy bar anyway, just tape some old picks together and stick it in front of the trem block. It will basically make it a fixed bridge.

And I know plenty of folks who use 11's for E-standard.
Geez, Stevie Ray Vaughan used 12's for E-flat!
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Last edited by ryanbwags at Jul 17, 2015,
#6
I'm pretty sure it must be some sort of issue with the trem bridge. You can tune literally any string to any pitch as long the tension won't break it, if something it will just feel/sound horrible (e.g. if you tuned down a 46 string to A or something).

A 11-54 set should be able to work in E standard but will be really tight, it should be just at home in drop C and still sort of OK in drop B. But if you have a tremolo bridge, changing tunings can be a nightmare so better to stick with one. If it's a fixed bridge, you should be able to go between drop B and drop C (and probably even C# standard/D standard) without much issue.
#7
Quote by TheLiberation
I'm pretty sure it must be some sort of issue with the trem bridge. You can tune literally any string to any pitch as long the tension won't break it, if something it will just feel/sound horrible (e.g. if you tuned down a 46 string to A or something).

A 11-54 set should be able to work in E standard but will be really tight, it should be just at home in drop C and still sort of OK in drop B. But if you have a tremolo bridge, changing tunings can be a nightmare so better to stick with one. If it's a fixed bridge, you should be able to go between drop B and drop C (and probably even C# standard/D standard) without much issue.



Sorry guys. I'm just a ******. I was just too p#ssy to tune it up any further because I thought it was going to snap. So I let my friend do it and he just kept twisting the tuning key. I'm a failure and probably shouldn't being playing but that's all it was. I apologise for time wasting....
#8
It's fine, don't worry.

Although truth is, it's better to be careful when tuning a set like 11-54 to E - it's quite a bit of tension. It's generally a good practice to stretch the string a bit with your hands before putting it on, and at the beginning better tune it to D or D# and then go up to E after you finish restringing all six. Never had a string break while putting on new strings on electric, but had some unhappy experiences of this type with my acoustic with a similar gauge of strings :P