#1
Hi guys . Need some help. I have a BC Rich Warlock . Yesterday I changed its strings , after that it started giving some nasty buzz above 7th fret on all strings.
To fix the problem I made some adjustments.

Here's what I did

I tighten the truss rod by half a turn .
Raised the bridge a little
Fixed the notation by loosening the saddle screws (on the lower side of the bridge) and then making adjustments as I tightened them

Now these adjustments took care of the excessive buzz . But there's still some left mostly in 4th string .

So what else I can do to fix this? ?
#2
Maybe wait some days to have it all settle. Then re-check everything. Perhaps change that string again and check the nut there.
#3
could be just a bad string?? also like the person above said give it a day or so to adjust to the truss rod adjustment.. also can you hear the buzz when playing threw the amp?? and did you use the same gauge of strings and same brand??
#4
Quote by monsterbk2
could be just a bad string?? also like the person above said give it a day or so to adjust to the truss rod adjustment.. also can you hear the buzz when playing threw the amp?? and did you use the same gauge of strings and same brand??


A day is gone
buzz isnt that much through the amp
And Guage was increased by one before it was 9 now it's 10
Strings are DADDARIO . Thats what u normally use
#5
Good evening,

Use a straight edge to determine two things.

1) Bow on the neck. If you have been playing with the truss rod, this is a good idea anyway.

2) Single frets at an incorrect height. You could for example have one or two higher frets that are not seated correctly. This would induce buzzing at quite a few frets up the neck. Having not played the instrument this is more of a would guess and something to look into before bending the complete neck every which way and raising action to an unplayable level.

As a final question, are the frets damaged in any way? Nicks, divot, wear grooves etc... We just need the full picture to cover off any other possibilities.


I hope this helps to start,
- Dickie
#6
Before touching the truss rod you need to know IF it needs adjusting...tightening 1/2 turn might be too much, and could be the wrong direction, depending on what the neck relief looks like.

Put a capo on the 1st fret. Fret the 12th - 14th. Check at the middle, about 7th fret, you need clearance there in the .010 to .015 range. A medium guitar pick will do, if it feels like it just barely drags on string and fret, you should be ok. Loosening adds more neck relief, tightening makes that gap closer. If you tighten it too much it can actually cause a hump in the middle of the neck. Not good...

Never touch the truss rod unless it needs adjustment, neck relief is its only purpose, period. Way too many people think it's required for setup and intonation, wrong. Neck relief is the only thing it does, it has absolutely nothing to do with action or intonation.

Going from .009 to .010 strings should put more tension on the neck and create more neck relief, which shouldn't cause buzz unless it's extreme.

Check for high frets, a credit card can work pretty well. Set it across 3 frets, if it rocks on top of one, that one is high. Tap it lightly with a small hammer and wooden dowel, if that doesn't do the trick it will have to be filed.

Check the nut slots and bridge saddle on the problem string to be sure both are seated well.

I can't think of much else...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#7
Quote by Dookie_1988
Good evening,

Use a straight edge to determine two things.

1) Bow on the neck. If you have been playing with the truss rod, this is a good idea anyway.

2) Single frets at an incorrect height. You could for example have one or two higher frets that are not seated correctly. This would induce buzzing at quite a few frets up the neck. Having not played the instrument this is more of a would guess and something to look into before bending the complete neck every which way and raising action to an unplayable level.

As a final question, are the frets damaged in any way? Nicks, divot, wear grooves etc... We just need the full picture to cover off any other possibilities.


I hope this helps to start,
- Dickie


Hi good evening
I cant seem to determine the bow thing that well . . maybe because I have bad eue sight. On my other guitar I always change the neck relief as the seasons change . I always judge the the neck relief by the feel of it .
All I know is that tightening the rod(clockwise) lowers the strings and loosening the rod (anti clockwise) raises them.
In this case, because it's a new guitar , I didn't touch the truss rod first . I started by raising the bridge .

And I don't think the frets are damaged because it's brand new.

What if I have a bad fret ? How can I pin point it ?
#9
I guess it's possible to check neck relief by the feel of things, but it's better to start with a neutral point: a straight neck. Us the strings to check how it is by fretting on fret 1 and 17 and then look at fret 7 or 8 or so.

Technically, turning the truss rod doesn't raise or lower the strings, changing the action would, but you get that effect.

Since this started once you changed string gauge and you're getting it on all strings it's not a damaged fret. If it were a fret you would get buzz only on that fret.

This takes time and patience. Personally I like to give the wood some time to settle and wait a day before making more changes. But it sounds like you've taking care of things for the most part. I would clean the nut and saddle at the 4th string. Perhaps even change just that string again.
#10
-you need to dial in your neck relief. imo .01 to .015 is too much. i usually aim for .003 to .005. but those larger figures may be all that your guitar can deal with. get a set of automotive feeler gages to check. capo and fret as stated earlier. if you have bad eyes use a loop or a magnifier.

-how to find a bad fret. use a fret rocker. or you can use anything pin-like that is steel, absolutely straight, and will span three frets anywhere on the neck. that's why a fret rocker is cool because it has multiple sides just for that reason and fits in between strings. lay the tool across three frets and "rock" the thing back and forth parallel to the length of the neck. the action is like a teeter-totter with any high frets being in the middle of any group of three. a little clicking sound will be heard/felt as the tool touches any frets to the left or to the right of the high fret. if nothing is happening with that group, move up one fret and check the next group etc.. once you use one you'll get the idea. now how to deal with a bad fret correctly is another discussion.
#11
Quote by kian89

I cant seem to determine the bow thing that well . . maybe because I have bad eue sight. On my other guitar I always change the neck relief as the seasons change . I always judge the the neck relief by the feel of it .


Not the way you do it. Relief should be very small, in the range of .008-.010"
Most good techs will use automotive feeler gauges to set it correctly. It should NOT be something that you set by feel.

Quote by kian89
All I know is that tightening the rod(clockwise) lowers the strings and loosening the rod (anti clockwise) raises them.


First mistake. You don't set your action with the truss rod.

You need three things to properly set your action. One is a set of level frets. If you've got a few that are higher or lower, you're never going to be able to set your action low without buzzing or fretting out. Two is a properly cut nut. Many nuts are cut a bit too high from the manufacturer. If you try to compensate for a nut cut too-high by lowering the bridge, you'll develop buzz in the frets from about the 15th t0 the 22nd or 24th. If your nut is cut too low, you'll begin to get fret buzz on the 1-5th frets. And Three is a properly adjusted bridge. Usually it's the bridge/nut relationship that will determine your action. Both nut and bridge should also be properly set for the radius of the fretboard/frets, with the bass side a bit higher than the treble side.

"Relief" is a tiny bit of extra space in the middle of the guitar's string length that allows the strings to vibrate freely. It's a very tiny (did I say that already) amount, and some folks are just fine with a perfectly flat fretboard. It will also compensate (to a degree) for neck changes caused by weather or string tension differences. Note that truss rods only adjust relief for the middle part of the neck (usually greatest in the 7th - 10th fret regions) and won't do squat for you in the upper registers or in the first four or five frets.

Quote by kian89
In this case, because it's a new guitar , I didn't touch the truss rod first . I started by raising the bridge .


"Brand new" has nothing to do with properly set up or with having level frets, nor does the value of the guitar. I have a $4K Gibson Axcess Custom that came from the Custom Shop needing fretwork and setup love. We fed it to a PLEK machine in order to get rid of a Gibson Hump. Plays great now, but didn't when I got it.

Quote by kian89
And I don't think the frets are damaged because it's brand new.

What if I have a bad fret ? How can I pin point it ?


Again, "brand new" has nothing to do with it. There can be issues if it comes directly from the factory and out of the box, but it's even more likely to have issues if it's been sitting on the wall at a guitar store for a while. Air conditioning and climate changes (with guitars traveling 6500 miles or more from asian manufacturing plants, it's definitely a thing) wreak havoc on new guitars.

You can pinpoint fret issues by using two tools (you should own these things for as long as you have a guitar); a good 18" stainless straight edge and a "fret rocker."

This is a fret rocker:



You'll notice that it has four different-length edges. This allows you to handle groups of three frets at a time from around the nut, where they're widely spaced, down to almost the neck pickup, where they're closely spaced. Using one of these will help you determine whether you have a single fret that's higher or lower than the others.

Buy a book (yes, a BOOK!) called "How To Make Your Electric Guitar Play Great" by Dan Erlewine. Best $20 (Amazon) you'll spend on your guitar. It'll walk you through a wide variety of issues and fixes you'll run into with your guitar.