#1
Hey guys- wondering if you could help me out with something. I've been practicing Green Day's When I Come Around (have known it for a while though), and I can't seem to conceptualize a rhythm for the verse that matches the record. Not sure if a pick-up measure is involved or something else.

I've attached a file of the way (roughly, at least) that I play it. I'm a very visual learner, so I would really appreciate it if you could edit the file to represent the actual rhythm.

Thanks!
Attachments:
When I Come Around.gp5
#3
It's an easy song. Just think of the rhythm separated. The first chord is bG. Listen to the song a second at the time. Then "memorize" the rhythm and try to play that part. Proceed through the song like this.
Last edited by Billie_J at Jul 18, 2015,
#4
Quote by Billie_J
It's an easy song. Just think of the rhythm separated. The first chord is bG. Listen to the song a second at the time. Then "memorize" the rhythm and try to play that part. Proceed through the song like this.


Hey Billie_J,

We always write the b or # after the letter ... so Gb.

cheers, Jerry
#5
Quote by Jake P
Hey guys- wondering if you could help me out with something. I've been practicing Green Day's When I Come Around (have known it for a while though), and I can't seem to conceptualize a rhythm for the verse that matches the record. Not sure if a pick-up measure is involved or something else.

I've attached a file of the way (roughly, at least) that I play it. I'm a very visual learner, so I would really appreciate it if you could edit the file to represent the actual rhythm.

Thanks!


Jake,

You'll learn more if you work through this yourself.

Have you got any means of looping sections of the tune, and slowing it down? (e.g. seventhstring's "Transcribe" ... http://www.seventhstring.com/).

This will really, really help you, and is worth every penny.

You'd just need to set the start of a section at the start of a bar, and then set the end of the section one or two bars further ahead, slow down the loop. and measure what's happening where.

Realise the drums are essentially giving you the equivalent of a visual measure, but sonically.

They are "showing" where the bar starts, and the beats in the bar.

Therefore you can "measure" other sounds as occurring on, before, or after the beat. Then you judge how much by, and whether the guitarist is breaking a beat down into 2 or 4 sub-beats (whatever), and where he's not playing (silence).

You need to learn a bit about rhythmic note values, and their relations to each other (e.g. 1/4 note, 1/8th note, 1/16th note), and practice with a metronome.

E.g. at 80 bpm, play 8 notes, one per click ... then double up and play 16 notes now (two per click) ... and again, playing 32 notes now (four per click) ... then back to two notes per click, then back to one note per click. (a "note" could of course be a chord)

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jul 18, 2015,
#6
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Hey Billie_J,

We always write the b or # after the letter ... so Gb.

cheers, Jerry


Seen it written with both bG and Gb so I don't know whether this is something that's different in other countries. Or something... But yeah.
#7
Quote by Billie_J
Seen it written with both bG and Gb so I don't know whether this is something that's different in other countries. Or something... But yeah.


Good point ... certainly in UK and US its Gb.

But then of course there's the H in Germany and Scandanavia.

Something else to catch us out :-)
#8
Just because something is written down doesn't mean it's right in any system. I think of "bG" (flat G) as a G 0.0-50 cents flat. It is still a G, but it is out of tune. The convention is invariably always note, then accidental. G flat. Gb.

H and B are in Germanic (non-Anglo) and Balkan systems, among others.

No one has mentioned solfeggio, which is common in the Romance and Semitic countries, as well as in China.

-----

Re: song - GD tune down 1/2 step. So G power chord shape comes first (355xxx). Slow the track down (there's a slow-down feature on YouTube too now) and try to say the rhythm out loud (I'm actually thinking of the song by breaking the word "chug" down, saying "ch" if it's palm muted and "chug" if they're not muting.)
#9
Quote by Jake P
Hey guys- wondering if you could help me out with something. I've been practicing Green Day's When I Come Around (have known it for a while though), and I can't seem to conceptualize a rhythm for the verse that matches the record. Not sure if a pick-up measure is involved or something else.

I've attached a file of the way (roughly, at least) that I play it. I'm a very visual learner, so I would really appreciate it if you could edit the file to represent the actual rhythm.

Thanks!
I don't have GP, so I can't view your file, but here's a graphic representation of the guitar intro (up to the drum fill), showing how it fits against the beats.
"x" - indeterminate chord (percussive muted) (Chords shown in brackets are apparent root notes, but not important)
"o" - staccato chord (palm muted)
"o====" - sustained chord

The beats are at a rate of 102 (if you can set a metronome). The dots are 16ths.
BEATS:   . .|1 . . . 2 . . . 3 . . . 4 . . .|1 . . . 2 . . . 3 . . . 4 . . .|
CHORDS:     |G          (E E)D          (D#E)Em          C                  |
RHYTHM:  x x|o   o   o== x x o   o   o== x x o   o== o   o===============   |
DRUMS:                                                           X X X X X X|    

So there's a couple of 16ths as a pickup before the first downbeat; and the C chord is syncopated - brought an 8th note ahead of beat 3.

BTW, I second jerry's recommendation of Transcribe, which shows you the waveform as a visual display and lets you mark the beats and add other labels (as well as slowdown and loop to help learn).

It might also be worth trying the demo of Riffstation, which also displays the waveform as it plays, and is pretty good at automatically identifying beats and chord changes (at least in simple music like this); but I wouldn't trust the chord names it gives you (often right, but not always).
Last edited by jongtr at Jul 19, 2015,
#10
Quote by jongtr
I don't have GP, so I can't view your file, but here's a graphic representation of the guitar intro (up to the drum fill), showing how it fits against the beats.
"x" - indeterminate chord (percussive muted) (Chords shown in brackets are apparent root notes, but not important)
"o" - staccato chord (palm muted)
"o====" - sustained chord

The beats are at a rate of 102 (if you can set a metronome). The dots are 16ths.
BEATS:   . .|1 . . . 2 . . . 3 . . . 4 . . .|1 . . . 2 . . . 3 . . . 4 . . .|
CHORDS: |G (E E)D (D#E)Em C |
RHYTHM: x x|o o o== x x o o o== x x o o== o o=============== |
DRUMS: X X X X X X|

So there's a couple of 16ths as a pickup before the first downbeat; and the C chord is syncopated - brought an 8th note ahead of beat 3.

BTW, I second jerry's recommendation of Transcribe, which shows you the waveform as a visual display and lets you mark the beats and add other labels (as well as slowdown and loop to help learn).

It might also be worth trying the demo of Riffstation, which also displays the waveform as it plays, and is pretty good at automatically identifying beats and chord changes (at least in simple music like this); but I wouldn't trust the chord names it gives you (often right, but not always).


Thank you for the great response! And thank you especially for not being another "Gatekeeper of Enlightenment"- no offense to you other guys, but it is getting a little old....