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#1
Not sure which forum I should post this in. This thread is about reaching that point in life where you realize that you aren't going to make a living as a musician. Honestly I reached that point a long time ago but accepting it is another matter. But let me start with a little background.

When I was in high school I was in a Metal band and we played a few local gigs and every year we played at a battle of the bands usually consisting of around 9 or 10 bands. We won both my junior and senior year and there was usually between 300 or 400 people in attendance. To us at the time this battle of the bands was like the Olympics, we prepared all year for it. And every time (whether we won or not) I would come home still high on adrenaline and just lay in bed all night thinking about how this is what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. When we graduated we were smart enough to know that our chances of making it probably weren't very good and we all went to college and went our separate ways.

Guitar for me has been mostly a solo endeavor since those days. Now I'm 25 and I still feel depressed when I look back on those days. Sometimes when I go to metal shows there is a mourning period after the show because I want to be doing what they are doing. I am a realist and I understand that even if I am good enough it would take pretty much throwing away everything else in my life to pursue a 1% chance of making a living doing it. I have a good career path ahead of me and I'm just not willing to do that. Recently I've had a resurgence of motivation for guitar and making music but sometimes I ask myself what am I trying to accomplish? If I have truly accepted that I'm not going to be a metal star then where am I going as a guitarist? Whats the point of even trying to make music?

Anyways, I can't imagine I'm the only one here that has gone through this and I'm just interested in hearing what others have to say on the subject!
#2
If your definition of making a living out of music is being a metal star then i would say you made the right choice. Trying to make a living out of a band is a hard thing, not even many of the big metal bands make a living out of touring, they still have regular professions when they get home from tour. (Not even big bands like Testament or Children of Bodom make a living, it is only recently they've been able to live of doing music full time)

Saying that you can't make a living as a musician i would argue though. Of course it isn't easy, no profession within the creative field (author, dancer, actor, musician) is easy to make into a full-time job. Fortunately for musicians we have more job opportunities to choose from. I have worked as a music teacher, done session work, been a touring musician, written commercial jingles, done studio sessions, transcribed stuff and worked as a songwriter. We have tons of opportunities to make money, the difficulty lies in that there are so many of us.

I've worked as a store clerk for years, it is only recently i've been able to live of doing only music related work. I know what a normal job is like and what it's like doing something you love, which is why i won't ever give up on making music work.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#3
Your life is your own. Your story is your own.

You don't ever have to stop dreaming. That doesn't mean that you try to be a 20 year old rock star when you're 60. There is no age limit. History might suggest otherwise but it is only a suggestion.

In thirty years will you regret not spending 3-5 years chasing a dream in your 20s, or will you regret putting your career on hold for 3-5 years in your 20s to chase a "silly" dream.

Besides you can do both. Alan is a regular in this forum. He has a career as a lawyer but also works as a professional musician and does hundreds of gigs a year.

At the end of the day though, only you can make decisions about what's important in your life. For some people being a broke ass musician or struggling artist that never makes it, living on noodles and cigarettes is a preferable life choice to abandoning those passions to be an accountant or forensic scientist.
Si
#4
I'm turning 21 this year,I picked up the guitar and theory since around april or may sometime. I know though,that I will never make a living out of it. Maybe the fact that I've started out too late is some factor of it. Is there something as starting out too late though? I look at people I know who's been playing for like maybe 5 years and I see how they play,it angers me that I did not pick it up earlier and kept up with it,because now I'll "always be 5 years" behind them...

But I have a full time job,recently graduated electrician and I kind of enjoy it. But I know music is something I want to do,no matter how I go about it I WANT to make music. I WANT to make music for my own,and others,enjoyment I guess I'll go as far as to say I WANT to make people move with my music

That is where my conviction lies anyway,no matter if I do it full time or as a hobby,I WILL make time for it! You do that too!
#5
The act of doing it is the reward.
if you were in a band before that stayed together multiple years then you have already "made it" more than me and most others.

I've been looking for a band that can stay together more than a few months for several years now with no results.

At this point I consider being in a band that can make it to the point of just performing one time live as an incredible success
#6
Most rock stars (apart from like the Stones and Whitesnake and such) don't make a living off of music either if that makes you feel any better. Making a living is very relatives term. There is a big difference between being able to get by and making seven plus figures.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#7
Playing guitar is the reward you yourself get from it. You could just enjoy it as a hobby to just screw around at home, or play in bands and pleasing people's ears.

For me, I'm quite pleased with how my musical life turned out, although I wouldn't mind a little more gigging. Started in bands in my mid teens 11 years ago. My band has been together for 7 years already. We play anywhere from a couple to say 10 gigs a year(slowed down a bit because everyone is starting families.) we're just a bar/cabaret cover band, and I was asked to join another that ive been with for a year or so.

I get a great deal of satisfaction getting people out of their seats and on the dance floor and havin a great time. When they're out there, the energy just comes back and puts a smile on my face. That's what I get out of playing guitar, and I'm happy with the little by of extra coin that I make from it.

Sometimes I often wonder what would have happened if I lived in a bigger centre, if I could have "made it" more than I have. I live in a own of about 1000 in the Canadian Prairies, so the opportunities aren't abundant, but in my area, so I have to take what I can get, but am very grateful for what I have and do.
#8
Heh, I'm going to an university as well and I'm not even thinking about "making it" just yet. There are still ways to go for me before I consider myself good enough to release my own music. So, you could say that while you're giving up on your dream, I'm still preparing for it. What I mean by this is that there's absolutely no reason why you couldn't still become a gigging musician, and that 25 years old is not old at all. I mean, that's the age where most formally taught musician graduate and start building their careers. So while you think that those days are over, I'd say that you haven't even started yet. Why don't you have a band? I'm sure that there are some musicians there that you can jam with. You know, just start a band, get gigs, do what you want. There are definitely opportunities out there.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#9
Quote by ryane24
Not sure which forum I should post this in. This thread is about reaching that point in life where you realize that you aren't going to make a living as a musician. Honestly I reached that point a long time ago but accepting it is another matter. But let me start with a little background.

When I was in high school I was in a Metal band and we played a few local gigs and every year we played at a battle of the bands usually consisting of around 9 or 10 bands. We won both my junior and senior year and there was usually between 300 or 400 people in attendance. To us at the time this battle of the bands was like the Olympics, we prepared all year for it. And every time (whether we won or not) I would come home still high on adrenaline and just lay in bed all night thinking about how this is what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. When we graduated we were smart enough to know that our chances of making it probably weren't very good and we all went to college and went our separate ways.

Guitar for me has been mostly a solo endeavor since those days. Now I'm 25 and I still feel depressed when I look back on those days.
25??? Only 25???
I'm 65, and my dream is still alive.... (But then I am certifiably crazy :bonk

The days are long gone when rock music was only for those under 25. (I seem to remember that was about 40 years ago...)
Quote by ryane24

Sometimes when I go to metal shows there is a mourning period after the show because I want to be doing what they are doing. I am a realist and I understand that even if I am good enough it would take pretty much throwing away everything else in my life to pursue a 1% chance of making a living doing it.
You're probably right, but why do you have to make a living at it? Why not pursue it as a (I hate this word) hobby?
IMO, we all need music in our lives, and performing it - even in front of a handful of people in a bar - is reward enough.
Quote by ryane24

Recently I've had a resurgence of motivation for guitar and making music but sometimes I ask myself what am I trying to accomplish? If I have truly accepted that I'm not going to be a metal star then where am I going as a guitarist? Whats the point of even trying to make music?
Erm..... enjoying the process??
I'd agree that doing it on your own feels a little pointless. You have to be doing it with friends, or for other people, ideally.

For every musician who "makes it", there must be 1000s who enjoy it as an amateur or semi-pro pursuit (and maybe some of them enjoy it even more than those tied up with contracts and professional demands). It's like sport. Just because you're never going to be a professional sportsman, would it stop you going to a park and throwing a ball around?

You're lucky you have a good career ahead of so you can make a living outside of music. That frees you up to play music as much as you like in your spare time.
#10
Making money on music doesn't mean you have to be on tour year round. Most people who do it for a living divide their time between teaching, performing, and other stuff like session playing, recording, composing, instrument service... And for someone who isn't already a pro musician right out of school, having a regular day job is really the best way to get ahead in music. It gives you the reliability you need to be useful as a musician. It takes a lot of dedication to pursue music as a second job, but at the very least it's supplemental income that is a lot of fun, and at best, maybe you'll catch a good break and get to play music closer to full-time. Hell, Bill Withers and Bob Segar weren't famous until their mid-30s, working regular jobs and just fitting music in when they could.
#11
Quote by ryane24
Not sure which forum I should post this in. This thread is about reaching that point in life where you realize that you aren't going to make a living as a musician. Honestly I reached that point a long time ago but accepting it is another matter. But let me start with a little background.

When I was in high school I was in a Metal band and we played a few local gigs and every year we played at a battle of the bands usually consisting of around 9 or 10 bands. We won both my junior and senior year and there was usually between 300 or 400 people in attendance. To us at the time this battle of the bands was like the Olympics, we prepared all year for it. And every time (whether we won or not) I would come home still high on adrenaline and just lay in bed all night thinking about how this is what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. When we graduated we were smart enough to know that our chances of making it probably weren't very good and we all went to college and went our separate ways.

Guitar for me has been mostly a solo endeavor since those days. Now I'm 25 and I still feel depressed when I look back on those days. Sometimes when I go to metal shows there is a mourning period after the show because I want to be doing what they are doing. I am a realist and I understand that even if I am good enough it would take pretty much throwing away everything else in my life to pursue a 1% chance of making a living doing it. I have a good career path ahead of me and I'm just not willing to do that. Recently I've had a resurgence of motivation for guitar and making music but sometimes I ask myself what am I trying to accomplish? If I have truly accepted that I'm not going to be a metal star then where am I going as a guitarist? Whats the point of even trying to make music?

Anyways, I can't imagine I'm the only one here that has gone through this and I'm just interested in hearing what others have to say on the subject!

Uh, why did you think that? When you guys left high school all of you were 18 right? Now you're 25. That's 6 years. If you and all of your friends stuck together and chased your music dreams you all probably would have made it by now. I say you all made the wrong decision by splitting up.
Why did you think your band wasn't going to make it? You said that your band won competitions. Isn't that good enough proof that your band was probably something special? Instead of wasting your time doubting your band you should have been working to make your dream a reality. 6 years is a long time. Anything could've happen in that amount of time
Last edited by J23L at Jul 19, 2015,
#13
Quote by :-D
statistics? logic? common sense? it's a potpourri of sensible concepts, really

take your pick

And this is the reason why many people don't make it. Lots of people think it's "common sense" that it won't happen for them. All you really have to do is grow a fanbase to get a record label's attention. Prove to them that they can make money off of you and record deals will be thrown your way. The quickest and easiest way to accomplish this is by the internet. This isn't the 80's anymore when you only had the option of gigging in your city and hoping some guy that works at a record label is in the audience. My band has just started so we haven't put out any music yet, but i really think it's this simple. People either think it's harder than what it is, or they just have shit music and wonder why nobody wants to sign them. This guy could have had 6 years worth of material to put on YouTube. If his band was as good as he said they were, one of the many songs that they could have made in a 6 year timespan should have brought them a decent amount of fans, which ultimately could have placed them on a record label's radar. Even if it was as impossible as you claim it to be i would still rather pursue it than be sitting on my ass wishing i was a musician. You should never give up
Last edited by J23L at Jul 19, 2015,
#14
Quote by J23L
All you really have to do is grow a fanbase to get a record label's attention. Prove to them that they can make money off of you and record deals will be thrown your way.


Yeah, you clearly don't know anything about how the industry works.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#15
Quote by theogonia777
Yeah, you clearly don't know anything about how the industry works.

I notice it all the time with new artists. All they do is get a good song which brings them fans and they get a record deal. If you made a song that produced over 100,000+ views on YouTube a record label will contact you. If you don't think so you're not paying attention to how these new artists are getting signed. Care to explain how getting a record deal is more complicated?
Last edited by J23L at Jul 19, 2015,
#16
Becoming a "Rock Star" is pretty overrated IMO. Go out and make music, have fun and create something all your own that attracts an audience.

This is definitely not still the 80s and the number of major labels with interest in signing new acts to a 5 year contract is 1/1000th of what it was then. If you do get a recording contract now it looks pretty ugly with most of the expenses coming out of your cut. The label is guaranteed to make money from your music but you are not. An ugly business indeed and not discussed nearly enough with players who still have stars in their eyes and are willing to sign their lives away easily.

One of the guys I hang out with occasionally when he is in town is Herman Li. By most accounts he is a Rock Star Metal guitarist and he does very well but is involved in many different aspects of music. Writing, performing, touring, recording, teaching, producing, including his love for creating video game sound effects. Herman still loves what he does but will be the first to tell you it is a hard road and he is always always working. He is an extremely rare guy with fierce determination, skill, a workaholic personality, and more than his share of luck.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#17
Quote by Cajundaddy
One of the guys I hang out with occasionally when he is in town is Herman Li. By most accounts he is a Rock Star Metal guitarist and he does very well but is involved in many different aspects of music. Writing, performing, touring, recording, teaching, producing, including his love for creating video game sound effects. Herman still loves what he does but will be the first to tell you it is a hard road and he is always always working. He is an extremely rare guy with fierce determination, skill, a workaholic personality, and more than his share of luck.


It's a shame that people often look down on him, he seems like a very dedicated musician. But it's pretty cool that you get to hang out. Never knew that he made video game effects as well though, which reminds me how much I'd like to score a video game. I'm playing through an RPG game named LISA at the moment and the soundtrack is so damn amazing. That's one of those things that have nothing to do with stardom but are definitely what I'd want to do as a musician.

I've found that the more experience I gain the less I'm interested in becoming a global superstar and I've started appreciating the little things. Beautiful soundtracks in games, jazz musicians that only play in front of five people but have a time of their life, and even talented buskers. Five years ago I thought that selling out stadiums was the coolest thing. Now I'd just like to get a small band and jam on the street.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#18
TS I think it's a little strange that you didn't start a new band once you left for school. You should do that. You want to, just get put there and do it.

Otherwise realistically your older band sounds like it was fun. It's a pity that you didn't get to ride it out to the end, but that's ok. Bands break up for a whole heap of reasons, bandmates moving elsewhere is a good one. At least it wasn't due to more negative reasons.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#19
Quote by J23L
Even if it was as impossible as you claim it to be i would still rather pursue it than be sitting on my ass wishing i was a musician. You should never give up

"being a musician" is not influenced or limited in any way by the individual's popularity
#20
Quote by J23L
I notice it all the time with new artists. All they do is get a good song which brings them fans and they get a record deal. If you made a song that produced over 100,000+ views on YouTube a record label will contact you. If you don't think so you're not paying attention to how these new artists are getting signed. Care to explain how getting a record deal is more complicated?

why do you think getting a record deal is useful to a small musician?
#21
Quote by J23L
And this is the reason why many people don't make it.


You speak from personal experience? Unless you've climbed this ladder yourself, you shouldn't assume it's an easy one.

Chasing a musical dream doesn't mean you should give up sensible living. You still have a life to get through, and responsibly as an adult. Spending your 20s in a van hustling $50 gigs doesn't make you any more likely to succeed as a musician, it just makes you a sucker. Being personally reliable and professional will help you succeed, and you can't be reliable or professional if the rest of your life is completely out of order.
#22
Quote by cdgraves
You speak from personal experience? Unless you've climbed this ladder yourself, you shouldn't assume it's an easy one.

Chasing a musical dream doesn't mean you should give up sensible living. You still have a life to get through, and responsibly as an adult. Spending your 20s in a van hustling $50 gigs doesn't make you any more likely to succeed as a musician, it just makes you a sucker. Being personally reliable and professional will help you succeed, and you can't be reliable or professional if the rest of your life is completely out of order.

You're taking what i said out of context. I never said making it was easy. I know it isn't easy. My point was that people who think they will never accomplish their musical dreams more then likely won't. The guy i was responding to said it was "common sense" that succeeding in music won't happen. This type of mindset assures failure. It starts with a certain mentality to succeed in any type of career like this (sports, actor, musician,etc). You have to believe in yourself first. You can't expect others to become fans of yours or believe in you if you don't believe in yourself first.

Also, I never said it was a good idea to spend your 20's in a van trying to become a famous band. I don't know where you're getting this from. I agree that your life should be in order, but my point is that you should never doubt yourself
#23
Quote by J23L
The guy i was responding to said it was "common sense" that succeeding in music won't happen. This type of mindset assures failure. It starts with a certain mentality to succeed in any type of career like this (sports, actor, musician,etc). You have to believe in yourself first. You can't expect others to become fans of yours or believe in you if you don't believe in yourself first.

here's what i said was common sense:
When we graduated we were smart enough to know that our chances of making it probably weren't very good and we all went to college


i'm not saying you should never believe in yourself or anything of the sort, but being able to recognize reality is also a handy skill to have. accepting that chances are slim doesn't mean you doubt your abilities, it means that you understand the immensely difficult barriers to become a musical success and don't make plans based on minuscule chances. you can keep up the high school guidance counselor "you can be anything you want to be" charade all you want, but what he did was pretty much the definition of common sense.
#24
If all you want out of playing music is to be a star then you made a good decision to get an education and a steady job. Now that you have a steady income you can pursue music on your own terms because you won't have to make decisions based on how you are going to pay your bills but rather invest your effort in doing what you feel motivated to do musically. You make it sound like 25 years old is over the hill. I have been playing for 40+ years and it's not over for me yet. I'm still out there most every week end playing and having a good time.

My "teen dreams" of being a star are long gone but they were replaced with the reality that I enjoy playing too much to just stop. Over the years I have enjoyed the ups and downs the "almost" moments like being in a band that was scouted by CBS in the late 70's. We recorded 6 songs in the CBS Studios in New York with a CBS contracted producer. Though eventually nothing came of it and CBS passed on the band, I cherish those "almost" moments.

In the end I found I really loved playing and wanted to be a "musician" not just a metal player, not a hard rock player, not a jazz player but an all round guitar player/musician who could jump into any type of playing situation. I think I have somewhat achieved those goals and while I am not exceptional at any one particular genre of music, I can definitely hold my own on most styles and best of all I just love to play even after all these years. I guess my point is that wanting to "make it" is a nice dream but it's a result of what you do, not a goal. It's the results that come from having the dedication and desire to play well, perform, write music etc. and do it all whether you make it or not.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jul 20, 2015,
#25
Who was the last legit "rockstar" that came around that had anything to do with guitar playing???
#26
Quote by EyeNon15
Who was the last legit "rockstar" that came around that had anything to do with guitar playing???


Brad Paisley? Dave Grohl? Mark Tremonti? Ed Sheeran?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#28
And Tremonti isn't even that good.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#29
Quote by cdgraves
Only one of these is notable as a guitarist.

Go Ed!!!!!!

thinking out loud = I I IV V. It's tried and true.
Si
#30
I much prefer:

Imaj7-VIm7-IIm7/IV-SubV7/IV-IVmaj7-IVm7-bVI7-subV7

Jazzing out loud - the JP reharm.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#31
Quote by Jet Penguin
I much prefer:

Imaj7-VIm7-IIm7/IV-SubV7/IV-IVmaj7-IVm7-bVI7-subV7

Jazzing out loud - the JP reharm.


Resolving a diatonic minor to another diatonic minor? Highly uncreative, dude. This is jazz - you need to be tonicizing at least once every bar.
#32
^Not quite. In C that'd be (with some fun extensions):

Cmaj7 - Am9 - Gm11 - Gb7#11 - Fmaj9 - Fm9 - Ab13 - Db9#11

Note, its IIm7/IV, not IIm7. Two diatonic minors in a row my ass.

Check yourself before you wreck yourself.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#33
Quote by Jet Penguin
^Not quite. In C that'd be:

Cmaj7 - Am7 - Gm7 - Gb7#11 - Fmaj7 - Fm7 - Ab13 - Db7#11

Two diatonic minors in a row my ass.

Check yourself before you wreck yourself.


dude you have to know that shit is illegible with all those goddamn dashes!

edit: and the all caps numerals!
Last edited by cdgraves at Jul 21, 2015,
#34
Fair enough. I'm pro all caps numerals with symbols; I think it's a better system and that appears to be a growing trend.

Either way I think Ed'd be proud, even if it is 4 chords a measure at his tempo.

P.S. Portland huh? We're basically neighbors.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#35
Quote by Jet Penguin
Fair enough. Either way I think Ed'd be proud, even if it is 4 chords a measure at his tempo.

P.S. Portland huh? We're basically neighbors.


I actually live in Denver now (as of last August). Afraid I only played once in MA while I lived up there, gig at Cisco brewing on Nantucket with my old cover band. Fun gig, but the worst drive ever from Portland.
#36
Oh man don't even get me started on driving from ME to MA. Totally awful.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#37
Quote by Jet Penguin
Fair enough. I'm pro all caps numerals with symbols; I think it's a better system and that appears to be a growing trend.



It makes sense in jazz, since function isn't quite and cut and dry and inversion only matters when specifically notated. You can almost analyze the minor/dominant resolution as a single harmony, in terms of function.
#38
Quote by Jet Penguin
Oh man don't even get me started on driving from ME to MA. Totally awful.


Right - but it's such a short drive, in miles. New England roads are somehow longer than they appear, because out west you can actually go places in less than an hour. Exception: if you think southbound 95 on a Sunday is bad, you should see I-70 coming from the mountains on a ski weekend here.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jul 21, 2015,
#39
Quote by cdgraves
Only one of these is notable as a guitarist.


All of them are actually pretty great guitarists. Grohl uses chords pretty creatively, Sheeran is pretty nifty on the loop pedals, Paisley is an awesome country guitarist and Tremonti is one of the better hard rock guitarists around.

Unless you are equating "notable" with "shred", they're all doing their part to wave the guitar flag on a pretty massive stage.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#40
I really appreciate the wisdom guys. I probably should have stated that I use the term rockstar loosely haha. I pretty much just mean making a livable salary off of music. If someone came to me tomorrow and said I'll give you 40K a year to play music I would probably be like lets go. Its never been about the money or the fame.

i'm not saying you should never believe in yourself or anything of the sort, but being able to recognize reality is also a handy skill to have. accepting that chances are slim doesn't mean you doubt your abilities, it means that you understand the immensely difficult barriers to become a musical success and don't make plans based on minuscule chances. you can keep up the high school guidance counselor "you can be anything you want to be" charade all you want, but what he did was pretty much the definition of common sense.


So much more goes into being in a band than just having skill. For instance we went through three drummers during our bands short existence. One of the drummers we had was ridiculously good for a high school drummer, in fact he probably had the most raw talent out of any of us but he improvised literally everything. Any time we would play something whether it be cover or original he would play something different and we could never seem to get on the same page. Not only do you have to have skill but you have to have 4 or 5 people that are all skilled and are all mostly on the same page. I'm all about the "guidance counselor" mentality, but you have to weigh the odds. If things don't work out you may end up down a road you didn't want to be on. Besides those guys were going to college regardless of what I did.

As someone mentioned earlier, no I didnt really make much effort to find a band in college because I had too many other things going on and yeah that's on me. I'm not even sure how I would go about it, put up fliers?
The thing about being a guitarist in search of a band is that everyone is a guitarist in search of a band. Seems like we are a dime a dozen.


Anyways, I really appreciate you guys sharing your experiences with me. Its really kind of shed some light and made me think about things differently!
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