#1
Hello everyone,

I just tuned my guitar, an Alvarez RD26 into drop D tuning to practice playing a certain song, but now, whenever I strike the low e strike on fret 9 the whole string gives off a weird, metal ringing sound (not the right kind). It ONLY happens on the 9th fret.

Does anyone have any clue what I'm doing wrong?

Thanks in advance
#3
Quote by paulbdv
Hello everyone,

I just tuned my guitar, an Alvarez RD26 into drop D tuning to practice playing a certain song, but now, whenever I strike the low e strike on fret 9 the whole string gives off a weird, metal ringing sound (not the right kind). It ONLY happens on the 9th fret.
The 9th fret would be near the high point of a neck with insufficient relief. However, if the guitar plays properly in standard tuning, it may not be in your best interest to adjust the relief to accommodate the one slack tuning.

The strings have a greater "excursion" when tension is released, and hence can hit the frets.

Quote by paulbdv
Does anyone have any clue what I'm doing wrong?....
You're not doing "anything wrong", it's just the nature of the beast.

You could put a slightly heavier gauge E-6 string on the guitar. Martin "acoustic light" sets have an .054' Low E, as opposed to the more standard .053, found in most .012 (light) sets.

Personally, I haven't found that much use for drop D anyway. But I have enough trouble figuring out what notes I'm playing in standard tuning...

There are what is called "drop D: capos, which leave the E string open, while applying the capo on strings 5 through 1. At the second fret, this gives you, "drop E" tuning. I use one for the Eagles "Peaceful Easy Feeling" as you get a whole lot more open string drone than you would playing it in the recorded key of E major. Keep in mind, they have perhaps 4 guitars, and it's doubtful if they're all playing using the same chord shapes anyway. And then there's Badfinger's, "Baby Blue" which is a really long story, but for later.

So, if you use a heavier E-6, you might have to widen the nut slot. If you gring and bear it, the buzzing might be reduced or stop, at least if the E-6 is new at the moment. As strings age, they require more tension to bring up to pitch. Hence, sometimes the buzz goes away during the life of the string set.
#4
I've become a big fan of the "drop D" capo. It gives you the low bass sound you're looking for on the 6th string, but doesn't mess up the voicing of your G chord.
Last edited by davebowers at Jul 22, 2015,