#1
Basically ever since I started playing I never really changed my technique or anything, but one thing that I can't fix has constantly always been a major annoying wolf tone on the high e string, and it's most notable when I fret it on the 12th string (usually tuned Eb but it happens across the entire string) why why why is this happening, I read things about wolf tones but nothing seems to help, the sounds seems to start smoothly and as the string loses energy (and thus volume) it starts to wobble massively it's very noticeable on distortion.

Happens with two of my guitars, one is a shitty squier with good pickups (so it sounds good, but the intonation is awful), the other one is a Shecter C1-Custom, sounds good overall but the pickups are stock.

Why is this happening? What can I do to fix it? (DIY kind of way, not "take it to a shop")

Thanks.

Things that may help or not: 100% sure it has to be the guitar, happens no matter how I output the sound (Amplifier or not, out of guitar pedal into headphones or not, into PC or not)
Last edited by Konohana at Jul 21, 2015,
#2
It's unlikely to be a wolf tone because it's happening on 2 different guitars that are very different in design to one another, so their resonant frequency is naturally going to be different.

What is actually causing the problem, I don't know though.
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#3
But like I mentioned, the other guitar is a squier, and squiers have awful intonation, wolf tones aren't that unlikely, are they?
#4
what happens if you tune back to 440? or tune down to 430? same thing on both guitars?
#6
Quote by ad_works
what happens if you tune back to 440? or tune down to 430? same thing on both guitars?


Same thing, any ideas?
Last edited by Konohana at Jul 21, 2015,
#7
Quote by Tony Done
If your Squier has awful intonation, it very likely just needs a set up. It isn't common for guitars to have the bridge in the wrong place these days.

Are you sure it is in the guitars and not in the FX/amp?


Yeah, I'm 100% sure it has to be the guitars.
#8
Quote by Tony Done
If your Squier has awful intonation, it very likely just needs a set up. It isn't common for guitars to have the bridge in the wrong place these days.

Are you sure it is in the guitars and not in the FX/amp?


It happens on my squier and Shecter guitar, not only the squier. Possible chance is they both have some sort of unpleasant frequency due to wolf tones/bad intonation, or.... what?
#10
Quote by Konohana
But like I mentioned, the other guitar is a squier, and squiers have awful intonation, wolf tones aren't that unlikely, are they?


Where in the world do you get, "Squiers have awful intonation" from?

Intonation is something you set. A guitar doesn't "have awful intonation" unless you don't set it correctly, and Squiers *as a brand* certainly don't have intonation issues.
#11
Maybe your pickups are too close to the string, there is a great article about wolf tones on the Seymour Duncan website.
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#12
Quote by ad_works
what happens if you tune back to 440? or tune down to 430? same thing on both guitars?


I'm kind of curious as to where it said anything about not being tuned to 440.
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#13
Quote by theogonia777
I'm kind of curious as to where it said anything about not being tuned to 440.


I think the original post said that he usually tuned to Eb.
#14
Quote by Evilnine
Maybe your pickups are too close to the string, there is a great article about wolf tones on the Seymour Duncan website.



This might be it I'll update when I adjust them
#15
Quote by dspellman
Where in the world do you get, "Squiers have awful intonation" from?

Intonation is something you set. A guitar doesn't "have awful intonation" unless you don't set it correctly, and Squiers *as a brand* certainly don't have intonation issues.


Sorry I guess that was bad wording, but I always have to adjust my Squier cause Canada life and winter wrecks my guitars. That being said the Schecter doesn't usually require as much adjusting. I fiddle around with the strat a lot because something's always off about it. Not a fan of how much attention it needs to sound good.
#17
Quote by Konohana
Sorry I guess that was bad wording, but I always have to adjust my Squier cause Canada life and winter wrecks my guitars. That being said the Schecter doesn't usually require as much adjusting. I fiddle around with the strat a lot because something's always off about it. Not a fan of how much attention it needs to sound good.


I have exactly one Squier (it's a bass) and it's fine. Never have to adjust it.
A few questions:
Is your Squier in a case, in a gig bag, or left out?
Ditto the Schecter?
Do you change string sizes or brands? Is there a trem on the guitar?
Where are your pickups set?
How high is your action?
How much do you screw with the truss rod?
#18
Quote by dspellman
I have exactly one Squier (it's a bass) and it's fine. Never have to adjust it.
A few questions:
Is your Squier in a case, in a gig bag, or left out?
Ditto the Schecter?
Do you change string sizes or brands? Is there a trem on the guitar?
Where are your pickups set?
How high is your action?
How much do you screw with the truss rod?


Schecter in a gig bag, squier in an acoustic guitar case (probably has more shelter from the elements than the schecter)

I don't really change string brands ever. I only change the string gauge and very seldom do I decide to change it. On the occasion that I do, I try them out on the shecter, and I change other factors like string height when I do.

Action on the squier is good, as low as possible without fret buzz, same for the schecter. Not a fan of high action.

I don't know how much I've screwed the truss rod, but I did check the relief for intonation just a few months ago, didn't keep count of how much I screwed it, I screwed it a bit and waited a day to recheck (if the wood is slow to curve or what not) I did this like two times until I was satisfied.

TL;DR the intonation should be good for both guitars, except right at this moment I'm messing with my Schecter's pickup balance screws because I don't really have much to work with. I lowered the pickup height and still the same.
Last edited by Konohana at Jul 23, 2015,
#19
ok, so far we can assume this:

-2 different guitars having the same problem.
-multiple truss rod screwings.
-possible random string gage changes.
-awful weather
-problem not responsive to a change in tuning.
-unfocused "adjustments"

barring loose hardware, truss rod, tuners, bridge parts, etc.. (un-likely on two different guitars but anything is possible) i'm going to go with fret rattle. why? because the string's excursion increases just before the pitch dies out, so basically it moves more. it's moving and hitting a fret when the note decays (you claim) and causing a racket. your action and neck relief are low too low on the treble side (you claim "high e" string)

-changing the tuning didn't help. this would attenuate out a wolf note real quick and you reported no change.
-pickup to close to the strings. this would only quench (dampen) the string not make it move more.

possible solution.
-get your neck relief sorted out and stop messing with it for now. don't tweak ten things at once, just focus on one at a time.
-adjust the action real high on your treble e. you should not have any rattle like this. gradually lower the string down, play, lower, play, etc... until you get back to the height where you start having your problem. then raise it up a little. what happens when you do this?

adjusting your pu's is cool and all per sd's article, but that only changes how the guitars pu's respond to the problem. making it seem like it has gone away but not really dealing with the issue.

as in life, most guitar problems are simple, not some mystical hoodoo that manifests itself in unexplained phenomena that only seems to be happening to you, and no one else. make a list, attack that item, observe the result, cross that item off the list, move forward.

since this is internet forum triage and you have provided not much and /or conflicting info, it's pretty hard to diagnose your problem. a you tube video might help here. or "take it to a shop".
Last edited by ad_works at Jul 24, 2015,
#20
Quote by ad_works
ok, so far we can assume this:

-2 different guitars having the same problem.
-multiple truss rod screwings.
-possible random string gage changes.
-awful weather
-problem not responsive to a change in tuning.
-unfocused "adjustments"

barring loose hardware, truss rod, tuners, bridge parts, etc.. (un-likely on two different guitars but anything is possible) i'm going to go with fret rattle. why? because the string's excursion increases just before the pitch dies out, so basically it moves more. it's moving and hitting a fret when the note decays (you claim) and causing a racket. your action and neck relief are low too low on the treble side (you claim "high e" string)

-changing the tuning didn't help. this would attenuate out a wolf note real quick and you reported no change.
-pickup to close to the strings. this would only quench (dampen) the string not make it move more.

possible solution.
-get your neck relief sorted out and stop messing with it for now. don't tweak ten things at once, just focus on one at a time.
-adjust the action real high on your treble e. you should not have any rattle like this. gradually lower the string down, play, lower, play, etc... until you get back to the height where you start having your problem. then raise it up a little. what happens when you do this?

adjusting your pu's is cool and all per sd's article, but that only changes how the guitars pu's respond to the problem. making it seem like it has gone away but not really dealing with the issue.

as in life, most guitar problems are simple, not some mystical hoodoo that manifests itself in unexplained phenomena that only seems to be happening to you, and no one else. make a list, attack that item, observe the result, cross that item off the list, move forward.

since this is internet forum triage and you have provided not much and /or conflicting info, it's pretty hard to diagnose your problem. a you tube video might help here. or "take it to a shop".


Believe it or not but the PU's were actually not even balanced. They now are however, didn't change the problem, but that's another problem tackled anyway.
As for your conclusion you might be right, I'll mess around the action shortly when I change strings and see if you were right. As for the relief, I think it's fine. Like I mentioned I didn't just screw the truss rod and then randomly assumed it was fine. I spent three days adjusting it little by little.
#21
Quote by Konohana
Believe it or not but the PU's were actually not even balanced. They now are however, didn't change the problem, but that's another problem tackled anyway.
As for your conclusion you might be right, I'll mess around the action shortly when I change strings and see if you were right. As for the relief, I think it's fine. Like I mentioned I didn't just screw the truss rod and then randomly assumed it was fine. I spent three days adjusting it little by little.


no worries, i wasn't trying to give you a hard time. try the string height change thing and see what that does.
#22
Quote by ad_works
no worries, i wasn't trying to give you a hard time. try the string height change thing and see what that does.


It seems that no change can be made further without destroying (rather decimating my play-ability) if I make the strings higher the problem becomes fairly minimal, but my speed is gone and palm muting becomes a hassle.

That being said I adjusted the truss rod again and now it's really well done (at least in my opinion it's done perfectly to my preference) and re-adjusted the height of the strings to make it as high as possible without making suck to play.

I also tried to play as softly as I could and the problem still persists, only noticeable on very high gain distortion or dirty channels. so maybe it's some sort of bad fretwork or what not, maybe I'll have to actually bring it to a shop rofl.
#23
Bump to add to the mystery, when I play close to the amp the amp's volume makes strings resonate more (duh) but if I hold the guitar at an angle the buzz happens, I can locate it near bridge but it's not like an obvious part of the guitar is ringing, it doesn't seem like any individual part is ringing. So maybe Nut or something? and it just comes out louder in the bridge for some odd reason ? I don't really know.
#24
Quote by Evilnine
Maybe your pickups are too close to the string

This is what I was thinking.
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