#1
I think the neck on my fender acousitc guitar is too slim for my hands. The guitar has a standard C shape neck most fender have now but the problems is my hands are big especially for my age (im turning 15 in october). Lately i've been noticing that my thumb is never flat against the neck. It is either wrapped arround the hole fretboard when im playing open chords or sticking completely out of the neck when im playing lead and when i play barre chords/power chords it is bent out of the neck like this:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v389/MAILER_DAEMON/0626091238.jpg~original

Now is this a problem? If its a problem is it my technique or is the neck of my guitar too slim for me?
#2
You could always get a guitar with a thicker and or wider neck if you think it's going to be an issue. You should be able to adapt though, personally I think being someone with short fingers like myself is more of a challenge than having long fingers especially when it comes to longer stretches. Long fingers give the ability to do some pretty long stretches to span the frets.
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#3
It would be easier to figure out your problem with pictures of your hand on the neck, in the playing positions you describe.
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#4
It's your technique.
I have XXL hands, and I'm comfortable with slim necks.

You can continue the way you're going; you'll find a lot of rock musicians wrap their thumbs, stick it out on the otherside, or bend it back. Sooner or later a thin neck will cause you some serious pain and you'll go in search of a chunky neck. You'll find a LOT of people looking for chunky necks so that they can use the muscles in the palm of their hands (and in their forearms) to help them pull down chords, etc.

Or you can develop "proper" classical technique, which will keep your thumb largely in the center of the neck of your guitar. The guitar neck should NOT rest on the palm of your hand or be supported by it. This will also allow your fingers to curve correctly, hit the string from the correct angle, yada yada. You'll be able to use the string in your fingers better, and if you start working with wider necks (7, 8, 9, 10-string guitars) ever, you'll be in good shape to do so. Otherwise, you'll have to relearn how to play in order to play those guitars correctly as well. You'll also reduce the chances that you'll develop arthritis so bad that you can't play the guitar later in life.

I honestly didn't know the difference when I was learning, but I started learning on a classical guitar and had the same teacher working on me with an electric when I started doing that. It's like learning to play the piano with the correct hand position. You can PLAY the piano with bad technique, but you'll never develop the precision and strength necessary to do it really well.
#5
But the thing is i really cant play with "correct" technique at least on that neck...i just cant and when i force it and put my thumb on the middle of the neck it just dosent feel right.
#6
Is it really the neck? Or has this idea of the neck being too slim become your obsession by now? I do not intend to sound rude; I'm just proposing another idea to ponder on. What technique are you talking about exactly? Aren't you just a bit lazy about practicing and trying to blame it on the neck?
Last edited by Mamurra at Jul 24, 2015,
#7
I dont know i play just fine with my "bad" technique actually i think i play really well for 1 year playing but everyone says this is wrong and i should correct it.
#8
Quote by adelino316
I dont know i play just fine with my "bad" technique actually i think i play really well for 1 year playing but everyone says this is wrong and i should correct it.


If you're playing for one whole year and you think you're pretty good and you play just fine with your current technique and you're unwilling to listen to anyone with a lot more experience make a suggestion when you've already admitted that your technique might be a problem for you long term...

Then I think you should just keep doing what you're doing, buy ever thicker guitar necks and just do what you like.

But consider that there may be a reason why everyone says you should correct it.
#9
Been there. Done that. Started playing (acoustic) with my thumb wrapped around the neck. It took the better part of 6 months before the correct position felt comfortable. It also involved changing the way I held the guitar.
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#10
When you play a wind instrument, you develop an "embouchure". This is a combination of a lot of things, but it includes the correct positioning of all of the parts of your mouth (and even the development of a callous or two) to facilitate your playing of the instrument.

There are other ways of playing it, including some that may seem, at the time, easier, and there are folks who manage to sound okay doing it some other way. But you'll find that 99% of symphony musicians who can REALLY play well will have nearly identical embouchures. The same concept applies to other instruments, including piano, violin/viola/cello, etc.

The huge number of guitar players out there, and the large number who've never been taught, but who've picked it up while watching a video somewhere, has given rise to a lot of players who have issues with neck thickness, width, fretboard radius and more, and who have issues when they try to tackle more advanced techniques.

You're young enough to develop good habits now. It'll save you a lot of money flipping guitars later because neck profiles that you can't deal with are keeping you from playing guitars that are otherwise superb.
Last edited by dspellman at Jul 24, 2015,
#11
Should i just force it then? like whenever im playing chords or something put my thumb in middle of the neck even if it feels unconfortable? will this fix it with time?
#12
And other thing i know Jimi Hendrix SRV and a lot of blues guitar players wrapp their thumbs arround the neck to play base notes and i think jimi played barre chords like that...what about them? if their technique is bad how are they so good?
#13
Quote by adelino316
Should i just force it then? like whenever im playing chords or something put my thumb in middle of the neck even if it feels unconfortable? will this fix it with time?


If you continue to flatten your thumb the way you're doing, you'll develop arthritis between the joint of the thumb where it meets your hand and your wrist where it meets your arm. Before that happens, however, that big muscle under your thumb toward the palm of your hand will get very sore. You'll need to consciously keep your thumb rounded, even when you're doing barre chords. It'll be harder for a while, no question.
#14
Quote by adelino316
And other thing i know Jimi Hendrix SRV and a lot of blues guitar players wrapp their thumbs arround the neck to play base notes and i think jimi played barre chords like that...what about them? if their technique is bad how are they so good?



That's just a technique used so you can hammer on certain notes that would otherwise be impossible in a regular barre.