#1
Hi, I've placed an order for a great Marshall amp, and will be needing a few effects such as delay, compression and volume pedal. I'd like something that don't color the already great tone, but simply applies the desired effects.

I haven't been keeping up with this technology since I bought a Digitech RP2000 some 16 years ago,so intuitively I'm thinking that a collection of stomp boxes is the way to go. But I'm sure there are great alternatives out there, hopefully something like a single unit that provides just the basic effects I'm in need of and does it really well.

So, what alternative do you guys suggest I go for?


Regards, Kenneth
Last edited by kenneho at Jul 24, 2015,
#2
which marshall is it?

roughly how much are you wanting to spend?

home playing or gigging (or both)?
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
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#3
Given your emphasis on sound, I'd say stomp boxes. Multifx are great for practice, headphones, seldom used fx or a lot of fx for a lil money, but imo even dirt cheap stompboxes sound better than mfx, most of the time.
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#4
Go visit the Wampler Pedals website and listen to the videos and sound files there.
#5
Single stomps since you only need a few. I'd recommend hardwire dl8 for delay, visual sound volume pedal & comp depending on purpose of use i.e. some are transparent & vice versa
#6
Quote by lucky1978
Given your emphasis on sound, I'd say stomp boxes. Multifx are great for practice, headphones, seldom used fx or a lot of fx for a lil money, but imo even dirt cheap stompboxes sound better than mfx, most of the time.


Ehhhh, no. I'm not sure what kind of mfx you've been listening to (and I see what you've purchased as stomps based on your sig), but...no.

Back to the OP: Another site you'll want to haunt (if you want separates) will be the axeandyoushallreceive.com website. HUGE selection of individual stomps. Do that before you settle for whatever GC carries as a default.

I'm using largely Pods and an older Axe-FX Ultra, but I have nothing against separate stomps (I have - almost literally - tons). If you're a bedroom tone jock, it's the only way to fly.

OTOH, the newer MFX units (particularly the more expensive ones) are excellent sound-wise.

And there's this: If you're picky about sound, you'll be spending bucks. Add up the cost of your pedalboard when you get done. Now notice how many points of failure it has (include every connector between the units and every power connector and the power source itself and each switch). Now notice how difficult it is to change more than one stomp at a time ("if I hold my foot just so...") and notice that even though you can stomp a couple, you can't change what they're doing unless you bend over and turn a knob or put one of those big knob surrounds on one knob and try to turn it with the edge of your shoe (I've SO been there, done that). And then look at how bulky and messy it is to cart around.

Then there's this. "I wish I could get that guy's sound." "Oh, he uses a __________."

And you're off to the store (or riffling through sales online) for yet another $200 box ($200 because you're serious about tone and because Joyo just doesn't do it for you). I can't tell you how many times I've used the MFX unit and its library of internal stomps to figure out whether or not I really want to bother hunting down a new box for the two whole songs where I'll use it prominently.

I have two and a half tightly packed flap-top bins (you know the kind) full of current, old and vintage stomps. Some are so old they think "bypass" involves heart surgery.

These days, as much as I love individual stomps (and still buy them, since it's an addiction without a 12-step program available) -- it's mostly the MFX setups for me.
#7
This is a great site for good cheap pedals
www.cheaperpedals.com
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2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#8
If you are looking for versatile pedals, I would recommend TC Electronics pedals. They are great pedals with the added bonus of being able to load a patch to directly to many of their pedals that changes the characteristics of the pedal.

Multi-Effect pedals have come a long way in 19 years, it couldn't hurt to look into that option either.
"We all have idols. Play like anyone you care about but try to be yourself while you're doing so." - BB King

"The thrill is being able to do it...even if you play it badly" - The Edge.

8 Guitars, 4 Amps, 3 Multi Pedals...and never done!
#9
Quote by Dave_Mc
which marshall is it?

roughly how much are you wanting to spend?

home playing or gigging (or both)?


It's a Marshall JVM410H, with a 1936 cab. After many, many years of playing, I'm getting my first tube amp.

I will be playing mostly at home, but needed such a powerful amp for the occasion large venue gig.
#10
Quote by dspellman

And there's this: If you're picky about sound, you'll be spending bucks. Add up the cost of your pedalboard when you get done. Now notice how many points of failure it has (include every connector between the units and every power connector and the power source itself and each switch). Now notice how difficult it is to change more than one stomp at a time ("if I hold my foot just so...") and notice that even though you can stomp a couple, you can't change what they're doing unless you bend over and turn a knob or put one of those big knob surrounds on one knob and try to turn it with the edge of your shoe (I've SO been there, done that). And then look at how bulky and messy it is to cart around.

Considering the gigs I play occasionally, I don't think I will need to change the effects gig time. But it's a valid point, which makes me lean towards some sort of programmable multifx box.
I just now came across TC Electronic Nova System, haven't really read up on it yet, but that looks interesting - simple fx box only, without the amp modeling seen in many other units.
#11
Quote by dspellman
Ehhhh, no. I'm not sure what kind of mfx you've been listening to (and I see what you've purchased as stomps based on your sig), but...no.

.

Wtf are you going on about? You seriously think your opinion is the only opinion? I've owned a half dozen different mfx and dozens of pedals. My opinion is as legit as yours so kindly **** off.
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#12
Quote by dspellman
Ehhhh, no. I'm not sure what kind of mfx you've been listening to (and I see what you've purchased as stomps based on your sig), but...no.

Back to the OP: Another site you'll want to haunt (if you want separates) will be the axeandyoushallreceive.com website. HUGE selection of individual stomps. Do that before you settle for whatever GC carries as a default.

I'm using largely Pods and an older Axe-FX Ultra, but I have nothing against separate stomps (I have - almost literally - tons). If you're a bedroom tone jock, it's the only way to fly.

OTOH, the newer MFX units (particularly the more expensive ones) are excellent sound-wise.

And there's this: If you're picky about sound, you'll be spending bucks. Add up the cost of your pedalboard when you get done. Now notice how many points of failure it has (include every connector between the units and every power connector and the power source itself and each switch). Now notice how difficult it is to change more than one stomp at a time ("if I hold my foot just so...") and notice that even though you can stomp a couple, you can't change what they're doing unless you bend over and turn a knob or put one of those big knob surrounds on one knob and try to turn it with the edge of your shoe (I've SO been there, done that). And then look at how bulky and messy it is to cart around.

Then there's this. "I wish I could get that guy's sound." "Oh, he uses a __________."

And you're off to the store (or riffling through sales online) for yet another $200 box ($200 because you're serious about tone and because Joyo just doesn't do it for you). I can't tell you how many times I've used the MFX unit and its library of internal stomps to figure out whether or not I really want to bother hunting down a new box for the two whole songs where I'll use it prominently.

I have two and a half tightly packed flap-top bins (you know the kind) full of current, old and vintage stomps. Some are so old they think "bypass" involves heart surgery.

These days, as much as I love individual stomps (and still buy them, since it's an addiction without a 12-step program available) -- it's mostly the MFX setups for me.


while i agree that many of the higher end multi-fx units do sound great for many fxthat's not the case for all. i have yet to hear an overdrive from a mfx that can tough a decent pedal. whas also suffer greatly with mfx. now as for the points of failure i'll hae to point out that while yes you have more points you can also remove the failed itm and keep plugging. you have any kind of failure with a mfx and you're screwed so which is worse is very debateable.

personally i think if you only use a few fx then pedals is the way to go. if you need a big variety of sounds then multi-fx is the way to go. often you end up using a combination.
#13
I'll throw in another vote towards individual stompboxes.

I've tried a couple of times to sell all of my stompboxes, and switch over to a MFX system, for like you said the ease of use, but I've never been fully satisfied with any MFX unit I've used. I'm not saying they suck, I'm just saying they don't quite work for me. I much prefer having the pedals in front of me, and they seem more pronounced.

To solve my routing problem, I picked up a Moen GEC9. Its a loop selector, so I can plug all of my effect, and amp into it, and make patches to switch with the flick of a switch. So for example, I can have bank A preset 1 set up for my amps clean with a delay, then hit preset 2 and switch to my amps gain channel, with a reverb. It helps avoid the Ol' tap dancing routine. You would need a switcher with midi functions to control the JVMs channels tho.
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#14
Quote by monwobobbo
while i agree that many of the higher end multi-fx units do sound great for many fxthat's not the case for all. i have yet to hear an overdrive from a mfx that can tough a decent pedal. whas also suffer greatly with mfx. now as for the points of failure i'll hae to point out that while yes you have more points you can also remove the failed itm and keep plugging. you have any kind of failure with a mfx and you're screwed so which is worse is very debateable.

personally i think if you only use a few fx then pedals is the way to go. if you need a big variety of sounds then multi-fx is the way to go. often you end up using a combination.


I'm a proponent of both, and I agree with you. Whether you go with one or the other depends on what you're doing.

As for overdrive -- since I *do* use amp and cab models in addition to the FX in these units, I'd suggest that you can do a lot with the combinations. And I'm guessing you haven't used the overdrive capabilities of an Axe-FX Ultra.

Points of failure: There are two issues. The likelihood of a failure always increases (some say exponentially) with the number of possible points of failure. When you play live, you carry spares. Guitars, amps, FX, cables, multifx units. That's a given. Reducing the *opportunity" and *likelihood* of failure is what reducing the snarl of a complicated pedalboard is about.
#15
Quote by red.guitar


To solve my routing problem, I picked up a Moen GEC9. Its a loop selector, so I can plug all of my effect, and amp into it, and make patches to switch with the flick of a switch. So for example, I can have bank A preset 1 set up for my amps clean with a delay, then hit preset 2 and switch to my amps gain channel, with a reverb. It helps avoid the Ol' tap dancing routine. You would need a switcher with midi functions to control the JVMs channels tho.


Yup, that's what I went with, except with a MIDI rig. To a large degree, that allowed me to keep the pedals in the backline, in drawers, out of harm's way. I could still walk back and, with the pedals at about waist level, I could make adjustments between songs if I needed to, or when there was a lull in the music. Some of the setups got very complicated. I'm not averse to that; if you've spent some time editing things on a Korg Kronos keyboard, a guitar MIDI setup is a breeze. And the Axe-FX Ultra basically requires MIDI if you're going to do any kind of pedalboard to control it.

What you can't control (as I mentioned before) with either a loop selector or a MIDI rig (usually) is where the individual stompbox is set (if you're using individual pedals). The chorus you used a second ago might not be the chorus you need now.

With user presets stored in a Multi-FX unit, you can edit an entire set list with mid-song changes, and you can not only change stompboxes in those presets, you can change how they're set as well.

I also find Multi-FX units great for noodling ideas. Some folks are content to have every song sound pretty much the same. But since I was raised on keyboards, finding some completely different sound is a creative springboard.
#16
Just my late two cents: Use physical stompboxes for dirt, compression, pitch, and other preamp goodness. Multi-effects like the Zoom G3 and POD HD are really great with delays, verbs, mods, and other such effects loop goodness with tube amps.
#17
Quote by kenneho
It's a Marshall JVM410H, with a 1936 cab. After many, many years of playing, I'm getting my first tube amp.

I will be playing mostly at home, but needed such a powerful amp for the occasion large venue gig.


thanks

this is no help, but it's really up to you. you can also use a mix of both as monwobobbo said.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#18
Many years ago I sold a stack of stomp boxes (mainly BOSS) when I bought a multi FX. :-( The sound was adequate but extremely convenient for gigs. It provided a small footprint, was quick to set up and (through pre-sets) I could jump from one complex FX set up to another at the press of a switch. Extremely convenient.

Subsequently I have moved to rack based effects and amps including multi fx processors and individual units linked to changes through midi. Again, very convenient to achieve complex FX changes quickly.

Now the down side - They are great once set up but can be a complete pain in the bum to change and tweak. One unit was so complicated that you could only access all the parameters by connecting a lap top.

As a result you can spend hours getting just the right sound (almost) and then end up with half a dozen or so settings you use for everything bar a handful of numbers that have settings so specific that they sound wrong for every song aside the one number they were set for. Great if you like playing with technology but can waste an inordinate amount of time which could be better employed playing.

If you are playing gigs and need to adapt complex FX settings then a multi FX unit or midi linked rack system is the way to go. Midi linked perhaps in preference to one unit as, if one unit fails, you loose the lot. If you have a rack based system there is often a rerouting option which will get you by - the same can be said of stomp boxes.

If you are just playing for fun, or require a limited number of changes, then stomp boxes are by far the best route. You know what is on, what is off and what to turn/press if you need a bit more or something or it is too fast, slow, deep, dirty, trebley, clean, phazed, compressed, flanged etc, etc etc.

In my pre-set systems there are some evolved settings that are so complex I have no idea what is in them any more. And I am sure there are set ups where sounds are cancelling each other and then something else is adding in to fill the void where I would be better without.

KIS - Keep it simple. It is much more fun and doesn't waste time. Get a note pad to keep track of settings and "Jobs a good'n."

As a caveat - If you are playing a lot of U2 or Pink Floyd etc. you may have no option but buy an FX processor (or 2) as the sounds are so complexly layered.

TC Electronics Tone Print pedals may be a reasonable alternative though. These also have the advantage of using reasonably high end processors to carry out limited processing tasks and retain at least a percentage of the original analogue signal path. Digital FX processors can often otherwise absorb the whole of the signal to manipulate leaving you nothing of the analogue source aside the ghost of what survives once converted back to analogue.

And a final note. Consider many of the Classic guitar tracks. Accepted they were processed through the recording but often there were probably few effects the player used aside their guitar, amp and fingers. I have been guilty of trying to get a sound or tone through FX when, originally that sound was only there through playing technique.
Please note: The above comments are based on my experience, and may represent my perception of that experience. This may not be accurate and, subject to the style of music you play, may be irrelevant or wrong.
Last edited by John Sims at Jul 25, 2015,