#1
Hi lads,

So I recently bought a blackstar ht-1 (combo) and I was mindblow by the tone,
but when I hook a distortion pedal the amp starts ''farting'', I've tried different guitars, pedals... I even tried it on another ht-1 and I've got the same problem!

I'm playing in B tuning btw, could the 8 inch speaker cause the farting?
#4
amp isn't designed with what you're trying to do in mind. it's a little practice amp with limitations. you may also be overdoing it with the distortion so ease up on that.
#5
Quote by monwobobbo
amp isn't designed with what you're trying to do in mind. it's a little practice amp with limitations. you may also be overdoing it with the distortion so ease up on that.

+1
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#6
Quote by sfx
Too much low end, amp can't handle it. Cut out some bass.
FTFY

You're trying to get some low end out of a 1w amp at medium volumes, but you can't because the amp doesn't have enough power.
Name's Luca.

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#7
there is a cheap speaker replacement that works wonders. its like 30 bucks. def worth the upgrade. or grab a 12 inch cabinet.
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#9
I was thinking about getting a ''12 cab, but I'm not sure if that will fix the problem.
#10
Quote by ognjenasator
I was thinking about getting a ''12 cab, but I'm not sure if that will fix the problem.


It won't.

Here are the basic physics: A speaker needs to move four times as much air in order to reproduce a note an octave down at the *same volume* as the higher note. You bought a ONE watt amplifier. It's worth noting that a Marshall stack, with 100W of power, will exhibit the same behavior. As you crank the volume, the bottom disappears. Steve Lukather talked ISP Technologies into designing a 600W subwoofer for him for when he uses one of those 100W tube amps with a 7-string guitar and wants reproduction of the lower frequencies without "farting out." Look up the Vector SL.

I have KRK Rokit 8 recording monitors that I use mostly for reproduction of guitar modelers and keyboards in my den. They have 100W each of power, but they're "biamped." Each speaker essentially has two separate amps (and two separate speakers), with the upper mids and highs taken care of by 20-25W (yes!) into the tweeter and 75-80W going to the 8" LF driver.

Your 8" guitar speaker will reproduce down to around 100Hz. That's somewhere around the fifth fret of your low E string. The 8" speaker in the Rokits is rated to reproduce down to 35Hz. But we're talking 100X the power of your HT1 to do that.

A 12" speaker won't help you -- you simply don't have the power to reproduce bottom end.
If you add a powered 12" subwoofer cabinet to the Rokit 8's I have, you'll get about 10 dB more power in that bottom end (32Hz to 120Hz, for example), but it will dedicate 240W of power just to that range. It will cross over anything higher than that to the Rokit 8's.

Note that my setup is designed for a relatively small to medium-sized room at reasonable listening volumes (it'll do big TV crash and bang movies very well) and I can even play bass through it. But the pair of speakers by themselves have 200W of power and the sub has another 240W of power. That's 440W of power to get a good, clean, wide range.
#11
Are you using the distortion pedal with the gain on the amp turned up already? Because that can turn your sound to mud if the pedal and the amp are out of phase, and because you’re over compressing the signal.