#1
Hi,

I recently bought an Epiphone Dobro Guitar and I have no idea how to play dobro(why I bought it) and I was wondering if anybody could maybe recommend some beginner ssongs for dobro guitar.

Sincerely,

A Bad Dobro Player
#3
Quote by kylefreedman81
Hi,

I recently bought an Epiphone Dobro Guitar and I have no idea how to play dobro(why I bought it) and I was wondering if anybody could maybe recommend some beginner ssongs for dobro guitar.

Sincerely,

A Bad Dobro Player
The only way to confront G.A.S. sometimes, is meet it head on with a credit card in your hand. I always keep meaning to buy a left handed banjo. Unfortunately, I'm an old fart, and I'll likely die before I feel I own enough 6 & 12 string guitars to go that far off the reservation to an instrument I don't know how to play. Hey wait, maybe I should buy a banjitar! Yeah, that's the ticket, a banjitar.

Anyway, musing over with. So, "Happy New Dobro Day" and best of luck with your new toy...

OK, so you tune it to a chord, and crack out a tone bar or a bottleneck and have at it! That's all I got, sorry.

I assuming you're into country music a bit. So, "Cindy Cashdollar", (Yes that's supposedly her real name), plays lap steel slide, (no pedals), so anything she has to say would have at least some value to you. Basically, a Dobro is a, or is very often used as, a 6 string lap steel anyway. (Which you also tune to a chord and go at it with a tone bar).

Well, you should find some of Cindy's tutorials at YouTube. YouTube is probably the place to start, and I'm unfamiliar with any books which might address themselves directly to lap steel slide technique.

So, Amazon is your friend for printed material, as would be Musician's Friend and others. YouTube is your friend for slide along training. IIRC, Kathy Baillie of "Baillie & the Boys", has excellent sparsely instrumented albums and an excellent slide player you could try jamming along with some of her. Garth Brooks also has a fair amount of slide in his material, but it's mostly pedal steel.

We also have a steel player or two here in this sub-forum, who could ring in any moment.
#4
Bad (predominantly) bottleneck player here.

First of all, open tunings. The key to proper slide is open tunings, most are good until you need a minor chord, so C6 tuning, while not easy to tune to on a regular guitar, is good with possibly customised string sets and allows you to plat both major and minor chords.

Second, muting. learning to mute with both hands is incredibly useful.
Left hand muting in bottleneck is usually done by the fingers closest to the nut, to stop the string left over from the slide's position, letting them free can result in unwanted noise and slight unpleasantness.
With lap slide, you have to use the same idea but slightly different technique, pinky and ring fingers would normally be used.
For the right hand, fingers or fingerpicks are highly suggested, as they allow you to control which strings are played, and in bottleneck the fingers (especially the thumb) are very good for muting as well.

I can't think of anything else yet but if I do, I'll post it if not already done.
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#5
The main difference between lap-style "dobro" and regular-style "bottleneck" is the way the slide is held. In bottleneck (Delta blues) the slide is on a finger, usually the pinkie. The index does most of the damping.

On a dobro, played lap-style, a more common item is the "steel" like "steel guitar" players use. This is held between thumb and fingers, and the pinkie does most of the damping.
Steels are surprisingly expensive, compared to slides, but do seem to work better for this sort of horizontal playing.
#6
Quote by Bikewer
The main difference between lap-style "dobro" and regular-style "bottleneck" is the way the slide is held. In bottleneck (Delta blues) the slide is on a finger, usually the pinkie. The index does most of the damping.

On a dobro, played lap-style, a more common item is the "steel" like "steel guitar" players use. This is held between thumb and fingers, and the pinkie does most of the damping.
Steels are surprisingly expensive, compared to slides, but do seem to work better for this sort of horizontal playing.
"Steel", AKA, "tonebar", one word. So now, I'm going to sit here a scratch my head trying to figure out which term is formal, and which is colloquial.... http://www.musiciansfriend.com/slides

Oh, and if there's a hole it it where your finger goes, then it's a "slide".

It makes sense that a steel or tonebar would would better than a slide, simply by virtue of the weight.

The question I have is if all Dobro / resonator guitars have flat (no radius) necks.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 27, 2015,
#7
Quote by Captaincranky
The question I have is if all Dobro / resonator guitars have flat (no radius) necks.

they do not, as mine has a radius.

Not sure about square-necks though
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#8
Quote by Pastafarian96
they do not, as mine has a radius.
We had a similar conversation back a few months, regarding playing slide with a standard guitar. Somebody claimed there are "accessory top nuts" (not sure of the exact term), available to raise the strings, while flattening out the string path. Thus enabling the guitar to do double duty, without an inordinately high action while playing with your fingers.

Quote by Pastafarian96
Not sure about square-necks though
As a pure guess, I'd very much doubt they have a neck radius, since you really can't play a square neck Dobro as a guitar. With a standard neck Dobro, or generic "resonator", you can. (I apologize for stating the obvious to you).
#9
Quote by Captaincranky
We had a similar conversation back a few months, regarding playing slide with a standard guitar. Somebody claimed there are "accessory top nuts" (not sure of the exact term), available to raise the strings, while flattening out the string path. Thus enabling the guitar to do double duty, without an inordinately high action while playing with your fingers.

You can get those, but all the ones I've seen (about 4 of them) have been homemade out of things like folded sheet metal, which also throws out the intonation because it raises the strings off the normal path, so not suggestible unless your ear is good and/or you're experienced.
Quote by Captaincranky
As a pure guess, I'd very much doubt they have a neck radius, since you really can't play a square neck Dobro as a guitar. With a standard neck Dobro, or generic "resonator", you can. (I apologize for stating the obvious to you).

Hey, I use my resonator as my main acoustic, as I don't currently have a correctly functioning regular acoustic six string (really must work on that).

Also I'd imagine a radius on a square neck would be a massive pain in the backside to play.
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
Last edited by Pastafarian96 at Jul 27, 2015,