#1
Is this true or a myth that it's hardest to do pinch harmonics on old strings? I am learning pinch harmonics...my strings are about 1 year old...but...I've only been playing guitar again for the last 2 weeks

Would they be affecting my pinch harmonics...My PH are too random atm I find it hard to replicate the exact same sound...and I seem to get alot of what sounds like 'half a pinch harmonic' or my thumb touch mutes it completely

Also how proficient is everyone at Pinch Harmonics? I cannot Billy Gibbons style solo with pinch harmonics but I can definitely tack one on the end of a riff like in metal,punk rock (mostly the only use I hear for them). How do you use your pinch harmonics?

The PH is harder to perform on the higher frets due to less string vibration? I mostly am not quick enough to get them to ring out past fret 5...but you bet I can hit the C pinch harmonic on the A string everytime
#2
I have to say, I wouldn't want to play on strings that were a year old anyway, I'd change those before doing anything at all!

That said... I don't know if there's a reason for it or if it's all in my head or what, but I always find that pinch harmonics come out easier on newer strings as well. Like I said, no idea if there's an actual physical reason for it or what but there you have it.

And: they take more precision the higher on the neck you get. Watch this so you can get an understanding of how harmonics work:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5j2AxGGmT-g

Then you should understand when I say that as you get higher on the neck the harmonics and dead spots on the strings get closer together. You have to be that much more precise with what you're doing to avoid just muting the string. It takes a fair bit of practice to be good enough to do what guys like Billy Gibbons do, so don't worry about it but keep up the practice!
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#3
New strings are normally a little brighter so I guess that might help with pinches.

That being said I haven't changed my strings in about 400 years and I still make every third note a pinch, so...

I'm pretty much a cheap rip off of zakk wylde

and yeah they're easier on the lower frets. and probably the middle strings.
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#4
I'm pretty sure everyone goes through the 'hit and miss' stage when trying to learn them.
I just kept trying and it eventually it fell into place. I don't know exactly what change in technique fixed it but, once I got it, I could replicate it with muscle memory.

When I changed to smaller picks I found that that really helped too as I had to choke the pick a lot more (due to its size) which keeps the side of my thumb close to the strings.

You could also practice by doing the chromatic run up and down the strings and try to pinch every note. I think that may get you to develop them faster than just trying to throw one in here and there.