#1
I know this might seem a silly question to the more advanced player but when playing notes from the pentatonic scale, depending if you're in a major or minor key does the minor pentatonic always start on an odd number such as 5 and 7.. ? And the major start on 8 and 10 or any even number really...
#3
yeah in frets, so say I was playing in the key of G, could I play a pentatonic starting on fret 5 or 7 or even 9 or would it have to be an even number such as 8 or 12?
#4
No, it doesn't start on even or odd number, but whatever your root is. If you're in G major, you'll start the shape at 3 (low E) and same with minor (they're both G notes). Don't think frets, seems some tab thinking is screwing you over.

Penta (5 from greek or latin whatever, pentagon is 5 corners) tonic together means like 5-tone (scale). 5 notes.
So your diatonic scale is 7 unique notes, minor pent consists of intervals 1,3,4,5,7. You ditch the 2 and 6 in the scale and play the rest. It sounds boring as hell if your playing revolves around this so don't worry too much about it. Read just a little bit of theory to understand this, it really sounds like tabs messing with you
#5
There are multiple pentatonics. Major pentatonic is all inside major key, minor pentatonic would not be. It is all inside minor key, but confusingly for now, both keys are the same "note pattern" in a way. For example. A minor and C major are the white keys on a piano. Same notes. But C minor and C major are different notes.

The bulk of the bluesy sound in blues is the minor pentatonic over the blues progression which is in a major key.

You can a major pent or minor pent that starts on any note. Whether it is major or minor, depends on what key you're in.

This might all sound confusing to you now, but you should figure all about the key. It's very useful information.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Jul 28, 2015,
#6
Quote by fanapathy
No, it doesn't start on even or odd number, but whatever your root is. If you're in G major, you'll start the shape at 3 (low E) and same with minor (they're both G notes). Don't think frets, seems some tab thinking is screwing you over.

Penta (5 from greek or latin whatever, pentagon is 5 corners) tonic together means like 5-tone (scale). 5 notes.
So your diatonic scale is 7 unique notes, minor pent consists of intervals 1,3,4,5,7. You ditch the 2 and 6 in the scale and play the rest. It sounds boring as hell if your playing revolves around this so don't worry too much about it. Read just a little bit of theory to understand this, it really sounds like tabs messing with you


Aah okay, thanks for this. I think from your answer that's given me a better understanding already! Just work from the keys root
#7
There are a million and one resources out there, but I think this guy does a nice job of laying everything out:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/improvising_with_knowledge_lesson_4.html

I have linked you to lesson 4, because it has the links for the other lessons, but you'll obviously need to begin with lesson 1. Ultimately, you may want to start by learning the positions (which it sounds like you're already doing), but these lessons will help everything make sense.
#8
The note the scale starts with is in the scale name. G minor pentatonic is G Bb C D F. It "starts" with a G. Find the notes on the fretboard and you have the Gm pent scale. There are many different places to play the same notes, and this is why there are different positions for one scale.

Start thinking about note names instead of just fret numbers. Nothing wrong with fret numbers, but it's pretty hard to understand any theory that way.

If you want to play the Ab minor pentatonic, you will start it on the 4th fret of the E string (I mean, the basic shape that everybody uses). If you want to play the Ab major pentatonic, it also has its root note on the same fret.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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