#1
Here's the deal. I have been playing very frequently for about 5 months. I am intrigued by classical guitar but I am intimidated by learning to read music. requirement? i want to learn things the right way. Also, have thought about getting an electric and learning blues/jazz. currently have 2 steel string acoustics, lower end. HELP/ADVICE?
#3
Pretty much the case if you want to play the classical repertoire. There have been folks who have figured out arrangements to various classical pieces by ear....But those guys are somewhat rare.

"Classical guitar" is a discipline all unto itself. The method of instruction, the repertioire, the technique, even the method of holding the guitar...All rather formalized and traditional.

Of course, a classical guitar is still just a guitar and they are very popular with all manner of folk, Latin, jazz, and other artists who are not remotely into playing the standard repertiore.
Look at Willie.... I play one, I play fingerstyle jazz. No "classical" instruction at all other than reading a few Guitar Player articles.
#4
Quote by mitche27
Here's the deal. I have been playing very frequently for about 5 months. I am intrigued by classical guitar but I am intimidated by learning to read music. requirement? i want to learn things the right way. Also, have thought about getting an electric and learning blues/jazz. currently have 2 steel string acoustics, lower end. HELP/ADVICE?
Most of what you're feeling is "GAS" (Guitar Acquisition Syndrome). After that being duly noted, do you honestly want to learn classical guitar, or are you infatuated with finger style on a nylon strung instrument?

You virtually have to learn to read music to play classical guitar. For the very simple reason, the "note clusters", (which are the chords), dictate where on the neck they are to be played. A "G" chord contains 3 notes, G, B, & D.. they can be played in different orders, and in certain cases can only be played in a certain position.

,Classical guitar basic rule is the thumb covers the E, A, & D strings, the Index covers G, the middle covers the B, and the ring covers the e-1. You put the guitar on your left leg, and your left foot on a foot stool. After that, I'm lost.

I believe you'd get further faster learning to read music. Besides, sheet music is already dumbed down for guitarists. Instead of being spread across 2 Clef signs as it is for piano, the notes are dropped an octave, and limited to the G clef.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 29, 2015,
#5
^^^ Yes, I think it is important to distinguish between classical and everything/anything else played on a nylon string guitar.

I wish I had learned to read SN fluently when I was young - a long-term investment whose value is difficult to appreciate until it has passed you by.
#6
I'm not sure I have GAS. I just want my playing to progress, and I think that takes a quality instrument, but I'm perfectly fine getting better at finger style on my steel strings. I was also not aware of all the genres that can be played on a nylon string guitar. Thanks everyone. Just intrigued by nylon, not a singer so I would like to just progress as far as I can with my playing. Thanks!
#7
The nylon-string I'm personally having a case of GAS for is the Godin Multiac model. That's a modern "hybrid" model with a skinnier neck and internal pickups.
At least from the YouTube demos.....They sound really good amplified and would be a very nice nylon-string jazz guitar.
However...I have a hard time justifying the price. For more than 200 dollars less, I can get a more conventional jazz guitar (the Ibanez Artcore 95).
#8
i've played every genre of music that exists on nylon string guitars over the years, but actually very much prefer steel. in fact, i also play classical music on steel string guitars.

mitche27, what guitar are you currently playing?
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#9
Im playing a Eterna by Yamaha that has had a new saddle put on and the action adjusted. It does the trick, nothing special. I am currently only playing a Washburn Rover travel guitar because I am in South Africa for the next 10 weeks!
#10
If you really want to learn classical music "the right way," then yes, you need to learn how to read music. Classical musicians mostly play music written by other composers, so you need to have a physical copy of the actual music to ensure you are playing everything the way they intended.
#11
Taking lessons in the future may be my best bet to learn classical guitar! Unless someone knows great online lessons??? Let me know
#15
Also, I'm a classical guitarist, it's what I do, have been doing it for a while now. I'll tell you that you can totally get away with just reading tab for the first little while. It's once things get a bit more complicated both rhythmically/dynamically etc. that tab will cease to cut it.
Learn a simple piece or two, to get an idea of whether or not you want to pursue it, then think about investing the time into a teacher, and reading music.

This is Lagrima, by Francesco Tarrega , one of the earliest and easiest pieces I, and most of classical guitarilagrima_tab.htmsts learn, in tab form.

Classical guitar is a super deep genre of music, and in my experience, infinitely rewarding. There's massive variety in repertoire, and a great and growing community, it would be fantastic if we could snag one more person!
UG Official night crew member #3