#1
Hey guys, I'm wanting to record some things on guitar but I have no idea what I need to get started. I want to be able to use a program like the one in this video. One thing I don't get is how you hear what you're playing while using a program like that. Do you just use your computer speakers or is there a way to output the sound from the program to an amp?

This is how I currently listen to music on my PC:
PC -> UCA202 -> HK 3480 -> Monitor 60's

Guitar amp:
Kustom KG100HFX

I don't want anything expensive, just something cheap that will get the job done

Thanks for your help!
Last edited by kadrek at Jul 29, 2015,
#2
You should read the introduction to recording sticky.
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#4
What do you guys think of this? I connect my comp with RCA cables to my stereo receiver, would I be able to connect the cables to the outputs on the back of the interface and have the guitar sound come out of the speakers? If I was using a program like Bias FX the modified sound from the program would be output to the speakers right?
#5
ipod touch and Garageband app
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Quote by kadrek
What do you guys think of this? I connect my comp with RCA cables to my stereo receiver, would I be able to connect the cables to the outputs on the back of the interface and have the guitar sound come out of the speakers? If I was using a program like Bias FX the modified sound from the program would be output to the speakers right?


Sure. You'd need the right 1/4 o rca connectors and you'd be set.
#7
No. I had the FocusRite 2i2 for guitar recording and while it was pretty easy to use, I didn't like the guitar tone quality. After some research, I found that this model did not have much headroom, which was particularly critical for recording good guitar tone. So I sold it and bought an M-Track Quad that I read was very good for guitar recording, though I had more trouble getting it to work with my computer compared to the FocusRite.

Now, I did read that this was not a problem in higher end FocusRite interfaces, like the 2i4, and also that FocusRite at some point addressed it in later 2i2 models (after I'd bought mine), so you might be okay, but I'd do some research on this issue before buying what appears to be the cheapest Focusrite interface.

I'm not sure about your other questions. You plug guitar cable into the interface (focusrite, M-Track, whatever). The interface plugs into the computer via usb or firewire. Generally, you would also use audio cables to connect your interface to external speakers / studio monitors.

Then you use your software (DAW like Reaper, or maybe just a Guitar Amp Simulator if you want to start simpler). You can set the audio out a few ways. It's possible to just have the audio out be your computer speakers (internal or external) that do not run through the interface at all.

More common I think is to route the audio out through the interface to external speakers / studio monitors plugged into the interface. So the sound signal is going from guitar through cable to interface through cable (usb/firewire) to computer, altered by Amp Sim, back to interface and then to the external speakers/studio monitors. Most any interface will have a dial where you can adjust to send some or all "dry" signal to the external speaker /audio (i.e., guitar to guitar cable to interface to audio cable to external speakers/monitors). Most any interface will also have a headphone jack so you can also listen through headphones.

Note, lag can be a problem. You might get it all working and find that you hear the sound a half second after you play it, which is really annoying. So then you have to troubleshoot reducing the lag time. It tends to be a bigger issue with cheaper interfaces and older computers. However, I use an 8 year old computer and relatively cheap interface and lag has not been a big problem. Note, I did have lag each time I set up my new interface, but then I'd "troubleshoot" it and was able to get rid of it pretty quick with some online help. Reaper has a good forum for that, though it's not the most intuitive. Audacity is probably simpler and free, but might be limited when you get to wanting to sound professional.
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