#1
I looked at the pinned threads and the linked tutorials, but they seem to all assume some knowledge of electrical systems. Some will explain terms, but do so by citing other terms I don't understand. Is there somewhere on UG or elsewhere y'all know of where I can find very basic info that's relevant to amp/signal processor building?
Custom-Built Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
Orange Rockerverb 50 Combo
#2
No there is not
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#3
just like on the seymour duncan page which the people there are very bright ask any questions and hope for a response for where you're unsure about certain aspects.
#4
These links
http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Electronics/audio/BasicAnalogue.pdf
http://www.epemag.com/index.html
http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/amplifier/amp_1.html
might help

but if you don't get the basic maths and physics then you will struggle to do anything with electronics.

Suggest you look for a basic analogue electronics course at your local college if you are serious about it.


Good song btw.
Last edited by PSimonR at Aug 2, 2015,
#5
Quote by PSimonR

The first one seems like it will be super helpful, thank you. I'll check the others if I need to.


but if you don't get the basic maths and physics then you will struggle to do anything with electronics.
Duly noted.

Good song btw.
Thanks!
Custom-Built Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
Orange Rockerverb 50 Combo
#6
Many of us, including myself, are technically trained people (I am an electrical engineer). If you can ask some specific questions I would be pleased to offer explanations.

Electric guitars are very, very simple electrically. Amplifiers are less so, but still not 'rocket science'.

Note that the subtleties that many of us discuss in this forum (i.e. which type of pickups, capacitors, tubes, *sound* the best) are usually not covered by electrical or electronics theory. That is because sound 'quality' or 'tone' is notoriously difficult to measure or observe objectively.
#7
Quote by Blademaster2
That is because sound 'quality' or 'tone' is notoriously difficult to measure or observe objectively.


Think of the song "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits. The guitar sound is a complete accident and the day they found this sound someone just bumped Mark Knopfler's mic setup, which was setup the "right" way. The music world is full of examples like these.

As far as electronics, there was a book which was a "Guide to tube amp repair" that might be helpful, or maybe looking at some of the famous schematics (like say JCM800 amps) will show you what the designers have in mind.