#1
I noticed my main guitar (a schecter c1custom) has a weird behaviour compared to my old squier strat when it comes to the volume knob.

For example my Strat at 1/10 on the volume pot sounds what you'd expect 1/10th as loud as 10/10, then 2/10 sounds 2/10 as loud as 10/10, and so on.

My shecter's volume knob however behaves oddly

1/10 is barely even audible
at 2/10 the volume spikes MASSIVELY, becomes audible and all that.
3/10 - 7/10 very small difference,
and from 7/10 -10/10 you can distinctively tell the difference between richness and general fullness of the sound.

WHY?

Does it have to do with the resistance of the pot?
What should I do so I can make it behave like my Strat?

TL;DR Shecter volume pot is garbage and barely usable from 1-2 and 3-7, where as the strat's volume pot has a distinct difference throughout all the possible settings (1-10)
#3
Quote by Explorerbuilder
What kind of pickups does the schecter have?
Usually that extreme of a change only happens when you use a very high value of pot with active pickups instead of 25k.


SH-1 '59 and SH-11, passives.
#4
It's not usually that extreme, but there are different tapers of volume knob. "Audio taper" pots are supposed to have a nice, easy transition from quiet to loud, like your Fender has. "Linear taper" pots are electrically linear, but when used in an audio circuit exhibit that volume jump you describe. Is it possible that someone replaced the volume pot in your guitar with a linear one? The pot you have in your Schecter may also have been changed for an audio pot with a strange taper, or maybe the original taper just isn't to your liking.

Some audio taper pots are not actually logarithmic, but are just two linear tapers with an 'elbow' in the middle, which may explain the jump in volume you're getting (the actual taper depends on the brand and sometimes the model of pot; some have a gentler transition than others). For a few dollars, you can try different pots. I'd start with audio taper pots from CTS, Alpha, or Bournes. If you don't know how to solder or work on your guitar, this is a great way to learn. Soldering iron (~40 watts; fine tip iron and not a 'gun') and some fine rosin-core (not acid-core or "plumbing") solder are very cheap and there are plenty of tutorials online.
#5
Quote by Roc8995
It's not usually that extreme, but there are different tapers of volume knob. "Audio taper" pots are supposed to have a nice, easy transition from quiet to loud, like your Fender has. "Linear taper" pots are electrically linear, but when used in an audio circuit exhibit that volume jump you describe. Is it possible that someone replaced the volume pot in your guitar with a linear one? The pot you have in your Schecter may also have been changed for an audio pot with a strange taper, or maybe the original taper just isn't to your liking.

Some audio taper pots are not actually logarithmic, but are just two linear tapers with an 'elbow' in the middle, which may explain the jump in volume you're getting (the actual taper depends on the brand and sometimes the model of pot; some have a gentler transition than others). For a few dollars, you can try different pots. I'd start with audio taper pots from CTS, Alpha, or Bournes. If you don't know how to solder or work on your guitar, this is a great way to learn. Soldering iron (~40 watts; fine tip iron and not a 'gun') and some fine rosin-core (not acid-core or "plumbing") solder are very cheap and there are plenty of tutorials online.



The ones I have are alpha 500k
#6
What taper? Audio will have an "A" in front of the resistance, linear a "B."

They don't cut out or pop at all, do they? Are you using a lot of distortion?
#7
Quote by Roc8995
What taper? Audio will have an "A" in front of the resistance, linear a "B."

They don't cut out or pop at all, do they? Are you using a lot of distortion?


I use all levels of distortion, could you explain the effects of distortion in relation to the type of taper?

I'm checking the taper atm
#9
pretty much there is two kinds of pots out there, we'll use 500k for both examples to make it as straight forward as possible
audio taper / logarithmic - A500k
linear - B500k
this is without getting into mods. Traditionally A is what is in most production models. B you'll see in Ibanez and a bunch of other guitars but again this is without getting into treble bleed mods and all.

you can peek inside the guitars pot without any de-soldering, maybe a bit of unscrewing and all.

linear is a very subtle volume change. Audio taper you get this massive swell if you go 10 to 0 or vice versa like the song iron man by black sabbath. Also Squier strats have 250k pots so this is another reason as technically:

the squier you'd have around 125k on the strat at 50% volume
the schecter is a bigger valued pot so you'd have around 250k at 50% volume
of course these values aren't exact as like Roc8995 said there is different tapers and how they work with the resistance of the pot. 10 is still 10 , 1 is still 1

humbuckers use 500k pots traditionally for more of a brighter sound. It comes down to preference like everything else in the guitar how we use it with our sound. Different string materials, different amps , picks, pickups ..etc all to custom tailor our sound. For example I use B500k pots for everything in my builds with humbuckers. Volume and tone. So the higher the resistance the brighter the sound, linear is a smoother decrease of resistance and the lower the resistance the darker the sound as we know. 1m (1000k) exist as well as 2m but usually 1m is too bright. You might as well switch to steel strings or use more treble on an amp.
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Aug 3, 2015,
#10
Quote by Tallwood13
pretty much there is two kinds of pots out there, we'll use 500k for both examples to make it as straight forward as possible
audio taper / logarithmic - A500k
linear - B500k
this is without getting into mods. Traditionally A is what is in most production models. B you'll see in Ibanez and a bunch of other guitars but again this is without getting into treble bleed mods and all.

you can peek inside the guitars pot without any de-soldering, maybe a bit of unscrewing and all.

linear is a very subtle volume change. Audio taper you get this massive swell if you go 10 to 0 or vice versa like the song iron man by black sabbath. Also Squier strats have 250k pots so this is another reason as technically:

the squier you'd have around 125k on the strat at 50% volume
the schecter is a bigger valued pot so you'd have around 250k at 50% volume
of course these values aren't exact as like Roc8995 said there is different tapers and how they work with the resistance of the pot. 10 is still 10 , 1 is still 1

humbuckers use 500k pots traditionally for more of a brighter sound. It comes down to preference like everything else in the guitar how we use it with out sound. For example I use B500k pots for everything in my builds. Volume and tone. So the higher the resistance the brighter the sound, linear is a smoother decrease of resistance and the lower the resistance the darker the sound as we know.


They're B's and I prefer A's so I guess that means I'll have to change them, are alpha B500ks the recommended/to-go pot brand ?
#11
Quote by Konohana
They're both B's rofl

There's your problem. Try an A for the volume control.
Alpha makes a decent pot. CTS are a bit nicer IMO but they're both fine.
#12
Quote by Roc8995
There's your problem. Try an A for the volume control.
Alpha makes a decent pot. CTS are a bit nicer IMO but they're both fine.


Thanks for the help, man.
#14
Quote by Tallwood13
there we go , problem solved.

this is a helpful video on why I like B500k pots , they wouldn't be right for you as you have two B500k pots but it's an interesting video for others interested to get more control out of their volumes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0SLdOWvz3c&spfreload=10


Mostly what irked me the most was the fact that my tone knob literally does nothing.

Goes from completely muddy to 100% on, I can't tell if it's an A/B pot by looking at it since it has a coil split module thing (idk what its called) but it definitely feels like a B
#15
Tone pots are almost always linear, and probably should be in most cases. A lot of times the "only useful on 9-10" syndrome is due to a cheap, junky OEM pot and a cheap, junky OEM capacitor. A few dollars spent on each can make a big difference.

Try a CTS or Alpha linear pot and an orange drop tone cap. You can experiment with the cap value as well if you like, they're cheap and it can make a big difference in the usability. Going down to a .022 or .015 cap can let you use more of the sweep if you're not someone who uses the lower half of the range with the stock value.
#16
Quote by Roc8995
Tone pots are almost always linear, and probably should be in most cases. A lot of times the "only useful on 9-10" syndrome is due to a cheap, junky OEM pot and a cheap, junky OEM capacitor. A few dollars spent on each can make a big difference.

Try a CTS or Alpha linear pot and an orange drop tone cap. You can experiment with the cap value as well if you like, they're cheap and it can make a big difference in the usability. Going down to a .022 or .015 cap can let you use more of the sweep if you're not someone who uses the lower half of the range with the stock value.


I do have an alpha linear pot on the tone knob. Feels awful, at least compared to the tone knob on the strat which is presumably audio taper.
#17
Feels, or sounds? There may be a different trace on it because it's a push/pull.
#18
Quote by Roc8995
Feels, or sounds? There may be a different trace on it because it's a push/pull.


hopefully, for the tone control knob it works a bit different.

90-100% is the biggest difference, basically I always set it to 90% when I use the tone knob, because that's where your tone isn't muddy/fat as **** and crunchy enough. 0% is just ugly as **** and 10-90% is barely noticeable.