#1
I've messed with a truss rod before, but I got a new used guitar (schecter solo damian) and I went lefty and it got harder to turn.

I wanted to know if truss rod screw/nut can be lefty tighty righty loosey. I also never really known how much relief was used for a typical setup. I know I need to loosen my truss as I put on a lighter gauge and now its buzzing.
#2
right is tight. you can't make right loose.

if you are all the way to the end of the travel with loosening, you could be fuct.

have you set up the rest of the guitar?
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#3
The guitar was pretty setup when I bought it. Just when I changed the strings it started buzzing so I went to the truss rod. The nut of the truss rod was already in a loose state.... I tried to back it up a bit more but I think there is this thing blocking it... like one of those string eyelets, but bigger and glued or press fit into place of the trussrod hole.

Guess I can wait a few days then adjust the bridge, eventually get a bigger gauge string again. I really wanted to put my new strings on but still have 2 more sets and barely played the ones I just put on. The old ones were nice but not exactly sure what set they were. (maybe ernie ball with a 10-52 has 10 std now)

Bit off topic, but I was checking out the action height above my 24th fret and its ~3/32. It feels high but is it that I just don't know that's the normal height? I watch people shred on youtube and then look at my guitar and wonder if its even possible. Do they have some crazy low action or are they just that pro?
#4
I could be wrong here but surely if you were to loosen the truss rod all the way it would get tighter? Like it will be loose to a point an then tighten up because you can't physically turn it anymore?

I have never actually done that for obvious reasons so can anyone weigh in?
#5
Quote by Random3
I could be wrong here but surely if you were to loosen the truss rod all the way it would get tighter? Like it will be loose to a point an then tighten up because you can't physically turn it anymore?

I have never actually done that for obvious reasons so can anyone weigh in?



It's just got threads on the other end so no. Think of a nut and bolt. If you loosen the bolt out of the nut, it's not gonna rethread itself.


If you can turn your truss rod with zero effort, then it's too loose and it's not doing its job. Tighten it up a bit and start from there.

Remember, the tighter the rod, the more convexed your next will be(bowed away).
Concaved neck will give you a high action.


Bit off topic, but I was checking out the action height above my 24th fret and its ~3/32. It feels high but is it that I just don't know that's the normal height? I watch people shred on youtube and then look at my guitar and wonder if its even possible. Do they have some crazy low action or are they just that pro?


The way I measure mine, is I put a capo on first fret, and press down on the 14th fret, and measure at the 8th fret. I like mine at .010". You can pick up a set of feeler gauges at a hardware store for cheap. Mine were like 8 bucks.
Last edited by esky15 at Aug 4, 2015,
#6
Just a thought. Some double-acting truss rods are installed upside-down, eg National Resophonic, so that going anticlockwise reduces relief and clockwise increases it. I almost separated a fingerboard discovering that. I doubt it applies in your case, but it is something to be aware of.