#1
Hi! I bought Morley Power Wah and I think it`s superior to most Cry Babies. It`s easier to switch on/off and also it`s optical vs mechanical. I`m very happy with my purchase. Has anyone similar experience with this pedal? There`s also Morley Wah, which is basically the same, just without boost/volume knob.
#2
I have a crybaby and a bad horsie II. Sometimes I'm in the mood for the crybaby, and sometimes the bad horsie.

Biggest down side of the morley is you can't just set it and leave it.
#3
Quote by slapsymcdougal
I have a crybaby and a bad horsie II. Sometimes I'm in the mood for the crybaby, and sometimes the bad horsie.

Biggest down side of the morley is you can't just set it and leave it.

To the best of my knowledge, Bad Horsie (designed by Steve Vai) is a different kind of pedal. It can very well simulate the sounds of speech. The Power Wah is a more traditional, if a little hot-rodded, wah wah pedal. It`s true that it`s risky to leave it set (like for example Michael Schenker would). The singnature Cry Babies are generally better that Power Wah. You`re correct that for some purposes the original Cry Babies are hard to beat as well.
#4
Quote by jiri.dolezal.79
To the best of my knowledge, Bad Horsie (designed by Steve Vai) is a different kind of pedal. It can very well simulate the sounds of speech. The Power Wah is a more traditional, if a little hot-rodded, wah wah pedal. It`s true that it`s risky to leave it set (like for example Michael Schenker would). The singnature Cry Babies are generally better that Power Wah. You`re correct that for some purposes the original Cry Babies are hard to beat as well.

The bad horsie does have a 'normal' wah and a 'contour' feature, which sounds odd. But the reason you can't leave it set is that the actual pedal has a spring or similar that returns it to the 'off' position if you take pressure off it.
#5
Quote by slapsymcdougal
The bad horsie does have a 'normal' wah and a 'contour' feature, which sounds odd. But the reason you can't leave it set is that the actual pedal has a spring or similar that returns it to the 'off' position if you take pressure off it.

Cool, I didn`t know that about the Bad Horsie. I`ve tried only Morley Classic Wah, which I didn`t like and Morley Power Wah that I purchased. Bad Horsie cost maybe twice as much and I haven`t even tried one yet. The original Cry Babies are usually priced somewhere between the Power Wah and Bad Horsie. Overall I`m happy with my choice. I used to own a Cry Baby in the past, but I didn`t like it. My Power Wah has no spring, so it stays where you leave it, but I agree that Cry Babies are superior in this aspect.
#6
Quote by slapsymcdougal
I have a crybaby and a bad horsie II. Sometimes I'm in the mood for the crybaby, and sometimes the bad horsie.

Biggest down side of the morley is you can't just set it and leave it.

You can park the PWA. It switches completely differently to the Bad Horsey.


I have a PWA and a Maverick, which is basically a miniature Bad Horsey. I prefer them to cry babies as well.
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#7
Morley Power Wha user here . i also have the classic wha as well. being able to park the tredle in any position and turn on / off from the side is a great feature. takes a little getting used to but i find it to be a plus. Morley's tend to have a bit of a different sound to them but again i prefer it to say a cry-baby (had an ancient thomas organ cry-baby for years). the buffer in them works really well with no noticable tone suck.