#1
I want to practice more with a metronome for my leads, but the tempo only goes to 240 on my metronome, and the notes are faster than that on many songs I play. I could just play notes in between the beats, but it's hard to properly determine how many notes I end up hitting that way when I'm going as fast as possible. Also within the beats perhaps my notes are not perfectly spaced (like 8 notes per beat, then maybe some of those notes are not timed perfectly).

For example with Zakk Wylde's fast pentatonic string skipping, I can go super fast but the timing is hard to keep stable. I want to use a metronome to practice stability at high speeds but the metronome doesn't keep up. Also I have a hard time hearing both the metronome and guitar at higher tempos.

Any suggestions on metronome technique?
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#2
That isn't how a metronome works.

You set it to whatever tempo you need, say for example 150bpm. Then if there is a lead part containing 16th notes, you play 4 notes every time the metronome goes click.

It isn't really possible to make it click every time a note should be played unless you have a metronome that allows you to change between straight, dotted, triplets and different note lengths which as far as I know doesn't exist.

There isn't any reason to do that anyway. A metronome isn't there to tell you when to play each note, it's there to tell you where the beat is so you don't fall out of time.
#3
I guess that makes sense. I started out tapping with my foot to time, then used a metronome with scales..but other than that always just playing to backing tracks which are of course in time. Not sure how a metronome will help me then, as overall my timing isn't an issue but I want more uniformity between each note on speed runs
We're just a battery for hire with the guitar fire
Ready and aimed at you
Pick up your balls and load up your cannon
For a twenty one gun salute
For those about to rock, FIRE!
We salute you
#4
It depends what kind of sound you want.

If you are doing a fast flurry of notes then the timing isn't going to be the primary concern. Steve Vai does this a lot as more of a musical effect, like a sudden burst of speed. You may be able to nail down that he is playing a group of 13 notes in half a bar at whatever bpm but really what matters is the feel and sound of what you are playing.

If you are playing a more mechanical alternate-picking part then the timing is absolutely crucial. If you can play it really fast but really sloppy then it is't going to sound good. If you are learning parts like this then slow the tempo right down until you can play it perfectly. Unless the part is particularly fiddly, I find starting at 50% to be about right. A lot of John Petrucci's lead work is this kind of thing.
#5
Quote by 21GunSalute
I guess that makes sense. I started out tapping with my foot to time, then used a metronome with scales..but other than that always just playing to backing tracks which are of course in time. Not sure how a metronome will help me then, as overall my timing isn't an issue but I want more uniformity between each note on speed runs


Timing is more than just landing on beat 1, it's making sure that every single note is played exactly where it should be in relation to the bar. That means, ideally, you want to be able to play any subdivision, of any beat, at any tempo, at exactly the right spot. If you want more uniformity between notes, then you want better timing, simple, and there's no better tool the job then a metronome. Play at a slow tempo, and just play 16th notes, making sure the notes are played just the right space apart, so there is NO deviation in timing. Over time increase the speed blah bblah blah you've probably heard this before, but this will improve your ability to keep consistent time at high speeds.

Also, at higher speeds it's better to actually slow down the metronome, but instead of playing lets say 8 notes, you play 16ths, or instead of 16ths, 32s etc. At faster speeds play 8 notes per click instead of 4, or 6 instead of 3, as this allows you to look at sections from a further distance and keeping time becomes easier.

Now granted you don't always have to be perfectly on time, you may want to be a bit behind or ahead of the beat, or incorporate rubato into your leads. But it's better you get the ability to play perfectly on time first, and incorporate those other alternatives later, because out of those options, being in the pocket is by far more useful most of the time.
Last edited by Jimjambanx at Aug 5, 2015,