#1
Greetings fellow bass enthusiasts,

A buddy of mine recently wrecked my bass amp with his beer pints so I'm currently looking for a new amp. I'm not too concerned about awesome quality since I'm not gigging at the moment and I'm using the high quality band room amps when I'm jamming with the band.

Since I started playing guitar I've opted to go for a decent guitar amp. My question is whether it is a 'bad idea' to play bass with a guitar amp. I don't know much in terms of electrical engineering with how amps are built, but since I'm playing a fuzzy lead thrash metal bass genre I don't think it would be a problem to buy a guitar amp instead of a bass amp, and just play on that with the pedals.

Would this be a bad idea? I don't mind not having a low-end bassy tone when I play, for all I care the more my bass sounds like an e-guitar the better. I'm just concerned with whether it would damage the amp, something like that.

Thanks for your input and advice.
#2
you'll mess up your speakers

that being said i practiced through a 10w guitar combo amp for years before i got a big boy amp

definitely make sure it's solid state, too, just to be on the safe side

if you have a bass cab that works, you can totally use a guitar head, but when it comes to a live gig you'll realize how much you're missing out on. but then you can go into the wonderful world of bi-amping
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#3
i haven't tried them but the new peavey vypyr vips are designed to handle bass as well.
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#4
Regular guitar speakers are at risk. If it sounds like you are causing damage, you are. Playing very quietly at home is not a problem, but loud and proud bass thru guitar speakers they won't last very long.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

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#5
Quote by 1obiobi
I don't mind not having a low-end bassy tone when I play, for all I care the more my bass sounds like an e-guitar the better.


Since everyone else addressed the potential to damage speakers, I will address that.

You might not care... but if you plan on jamming with people, they will certainly care. A wimpy, thin sounding distorted bass will get lost in the mix and yours buddies will opt to invite another bassist next time. One of the most important things to learn about playing with other musicians is that unless you are the undisputed leader (ie a solo artist with a backing band), it's not really all about what you want and more about what works best for the session. Usually that means having your bass sound like a bass.
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#6
You mostly just don't want to crank it. Low volumes will do no harm. The second you have any sort of real volume, you've probably blown a speaker. Basically, it's fine for low volume bedroom practice. Pretty substandard and damaging for everything else.
#7
Quote by Hail
you'll mess up your speakers

that being said i practiced through a 10w guitar combo amp for years before i got a big boy amp

definitely make sure it's solid state, too, just to be on the safe side

if you have a bass cab that works, you can totally use a guitar head, but when it comes to a live gig you'll realize how much you're missing out on. but then you can go into the wonderful world of bi-amping

You won't damage the amp unless it is low wattage.
Bass speakers have different surrounds {suspensions} that allow the excessive cone movement that provides the air being moved for low frequency notes without damaging the cone unlike guitar speaker cones.
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#8
I typically practice through a small acoustic guitar amp. No problems yet.
Like someone else said though, make sure it's solid state
#9
Sounds awesome, really trebley. Chris Squire did it for a while.

The amp itself can handle it but you need proper speakers, especially if you gonna play with a band. Regular guitar speakers cant handle the low frequencies very well. You need a proper bass cab.

I used an Egnater Rebel 20 with a gutted Ibanez Toneblaster 25, it had a 10 inch speaker and it was very competent in a band situation.
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Last edited by Guitar0player at Aug 28, 2015,
#10
Speakers will be the issue,

Farting out cone extrusion will be the problem.

It will come because the lower wattage of the guitar amp will place you in a competition you cannot win against the tonal efficiency of the guitar frequency spectrum against a poor guitar amp trying to make bass frequencies.

Thus, you will turn up, and dig in, and the cones will extrude, get hotter, and you will want more from them as they edge to fart out, so you turn up some more, and the coils get roasted.

That is pretty much how it will go down. So, resist the digging in and turning up, and you might be fine.
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