#1
i dont know if its the right catagory to post about daws.pardon me if its the wrong catagory. i want to cover sad but true by metallica...but i cant isolate the lead guitar parts.. can you guys tell me how to isolate solos from the song using reaper?

p.s-dont suggest me to record the backing track as i dont have an interface.
#2
Quote by intesers
i dont know if its the right catagory to post about daws.pardon me if its the wrong catagory. i want to cover sad but true by metallica...but i cant isolate the lead guitar parts.. can you guys tell me how to isolate solos from the song using reaper?

p.s-dont suggest me to record the backing track as i dont have an interface.


Not going to happen. Your best bet is to find a backing track that someone else recorded. And the recordings subforum is the correct place, but the answer there would be the same it is here: there's no way you can do that.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#3
You'll never be able to isolate a single instrument entirely, but if the audio is stereo there are ways of enhancing certain parts of the spectrum.
Eg, some software (not sure about reaper) will let you put the R and L channels out of phase, which removes anything panned dead centre - typically lead vocal and bass. That can help you hear other instruments.
Graphic EQ adjustments can help you remove bass too, which might help.

The most expensive version of Melodyne ($$$!) claims to be able to isolate instruments in a mix- and tweak them - by using various EQ and (presumably) phasing tricks, but again - with just a stereo track - it will be limited in how much you can truly isolate one thing, because most instruments share most of the frequency spectrum with others. And mono will make it even harder.
You'd need access to the original multitrack recording to really isolate stuff!

If reaper has no out-of-phase or radical EQ options, try Transcribe (free for 1 month):
http://www.seventhstring.com/
Unlike reaper, it's a dedicated transcription/learning program.
#5
If Sad But True appears on Guitar Hero, I guess somebody may have posted an isolated guitar track on youtube.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
Are you looking to isolate instruments to learn the parts or simply to record yourself on top? If you are looking for the first one there are software out there that allow you to tamper with the tempo, pitch and EQ of songs to bring forth as much of a specific element in the track as possible.

I use Anytune and Riffstation for this, Transcribe and Amazing Slow Downer are other options. You can often get very close to only having the solo track or the band playing, depends on how they mixed the album. You can probably do something similar in Reaper. But as said, there is no way to use software to completely isolate tracks. The only way to do that is to get the original stem tracks.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#7
I am just going to simply record on top. Just like the other youtube covers
#8
I know a couple of manual production techniques to isolate separate instrument tracks. But it's not easy and not to mention extremely time consuming I would not do it for what you are doing. But here's how you do it.
Find what instrument you want (in your case electric guitar; distorted guitar is really hard to do though), and recreate the timbre as closely as you can in most its range. So for guitar, you would need to modelling software or a similar amp. Then you spectrally analyse the sound and jot down it's partials.
Then you snip the fragment of the track you want into individual notes and parse it through you spectral analysis software, pull the necessary partials out and rebuild it in a new file. But if your purpose is to isolate the backing track, then you'll need to do this for each of the instruments in the backing track and rebuild all of them, otherwise you'll get residual resonance from the solo track. But this will take weeks and it's nigh impossible on instruments with high inharmonicity. Also the technique isn't perfect, but results can be pretty good if you do it right.
#9
Quote by jongtr
You'll never be able to isolate a single instrument entirely, but if the audio is stereo there are ways of enhancing certain parts of the spectrum.
Eg, some software (not sure about reaper) will let you put the R and L channels out of phase, which removes anything panned dead centre - typically lead vocal and bass. That can help you hear other instruments.
Graphic EQ adjustments can help you remove bass too, which might help.


Just a nitpick, it's not technically simply out of phase, since that would not help, and would only create phase distortion, but it is a perfect reverse polarity of phase, or inverse phase. For the layman, basically the sound wave is flipped upside down, which cancels everything out that's the same. So, if you have a signal that has a vocal you want to isolate, or a guitar solo, which is a mono signal, the same in both ears, you can use the reverse polarity feature to cancel out the voice data. You could then take what is left to do the exact same thing with the original signal, and everything will cancel out, except for what was mono. Reaper has a feature like that, which is a button on the channel strip. I think it's called inverse phase, which upsets some people that it's not called inverse polarity.

But you're right. OP, all you can really do is that, or EQ, which probably won't help you much. Unless of course you only want to remove a guitar solo, which is the only mono signal on the track. Or, if it shares mono with other things sitting in different frequency range. If that's the case, you could probably get it pretty good.

Some other audio tools like Adobe Audition can let you edit sound using a color audio spectrum, where different pitches are easier to isolate and remove also, which might be useful in combination with the phase cancellation technique.

That's if all you want to do is remove the solo so you can record your own.

If you just want to ear it out, I would use Transcribe!
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Aug 7, 2015,
#10

So i think downloading a backing track is the easiest method. Thanks guys
#12
^ He's playing over the album version. But One appears on Guitar Hero, so the original tracks can be found on Youtube.


BTW, the original Sad But True tracks can be found on Youtube. They are all ripped from Guitar Hero.

Bass

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nofTvBRgQbo

Drums

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5IVQwSGBhs

Vocals

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pLvf6cWb6w

Guitar

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfZBqbDg69M

So if you want to replace the original guitar parts with your playing, just download the bass, drum and vocal tracks, put them together and play over them.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#14
Google "guitar backing tracks", I believe that is the actual name of the site. For most popular songs they usually have at least 2 or 3 versions of backing tracks for download, and some with vocals and some without.