#1
Hello UG Community,

I had an on again off again relationship with my guitar throughout middle and high school, but this summer I've begun to play more than I ever have before. I really enjoy playing and the way it feels to just channel all of my thoughts and emotions into my fingers and let it play from the strings. When I was younger, I never really focused on getting better or improving. I would look up a song and if the tab was too daunting, I would move on to the next one.

All I want to do now is become the best guitar player I can be. I want to be able to play effortlessly and without thought, anything and everything. My main influences are John Frusciante and Jeff Buckley.

Basically what I would like some insight on, is what a solid daily practice routine would be to improve day by day. I would love to have a deliberate and concrete routine that really works all aspects of playing. Just something to work on for an hour or two or three every day. I've looked up a bunch of stuff, but I would love to hear what works for you guys and gals that keeps your skills sharp and improving.
#2
I think the most important thing would be finding something that motivates you, something that you don't find boring. Some people play scales up and down with a metronome and others just learn to play songs. It's about what works for you. For others mechanical stuff works, others find it boring and only play things musically. You can use songs as your technical exercises.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
Quote by Evertonian127
Hello UG Community,

I had an on again off again relationship with my guitar throughout middle and high school, but this summer I've begun to play more than I ever have before. I really enjoy playing and the way it feels to just channel all of my thoughts and emotions into my fingers and let it play from the strings. When I was younger, I never really focused on getting better or improving. I would look up a song and if the tab was too daunting, I would move on to the next one.

All I want to do now is become the best guitar player I can be. I want to be able to play effortlessly and without thought, anything and everything. My main influences are John Frusciante and Jeff Buckley.

Basically what I would like some insight on, is what a solid daily practice routine would be to improve day by day. I would love to have a deliberate and concrete routine that really works all aspects of playing. Just something to work on for an hour or two or three every day. I've looked up a bunch of stuff, but I would love to hear what works for you guys and gals that keeps your skills sharp and improving.


What you want to do will take many years of playing. What you will need to do it, is to work on it step by step and work on different things, and push and push and push everyday. Every day playing things you could not play before, or working on increasing your vocabulary, or songwriting skills, or what have you.

I think there is no consistent thing you'd always want to do. I have a stretch routine I do that I got from a youtube video, but that's the only thing I really consistently practice all the time. However, I went through phases, of working on speed, or learning parts of the major scale, so every day it was play the major scale, in positions faster and faster, and always some noodling to keep me happy.

I think the main general thing, is to somehow know what to work on next, and go and work on it, until you get it well enough, and move on to the next thing. Accomplish lots of little things, until one day you look back and you've gone very far.

Knowing what to work on, and when, is what is tough. That's where a good teacher that has skill sets you want to acquire can help you out.

What you want is a marathon and in some ways a grueling one, but also a really entertaining one. Like if you were running a grueling marathon through the most amazing scenery you could ever imagine. Hard work, but worth it.

That's if you want to be the best you can be. The best you can be is tough. You have to push limits constantly. But you can be very good and quite free without being the best you can be. Which is a similar journey, just at a slower pace.

I personally hate doing boring drills, but I've done a million of them, because the method I use makes it not boring. There is a way you can make it all interesting and entertaining, but there is still work at the end of the day. If you want to be a top athlete, you will have to run some drills. But when your mind is focused on being the best you can be at the drill, and you get accomplishment from that, then it can be cool, I find, if the drill is well designed.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Aug 7, 2015,
#5
If you're in a band that you love, you will find yourself with your guitar in your hands more often, as you practice your guitar parts between rehearsals and work towards goals with the band (shows, recording, promotion etc). Being in a band you love will always allow/encourage you to develop your own skills as well as your role within the group.
#6
Quote by cdgraves
Warmups/technique
New Music
Music you already know

Every day.


yep
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Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#8
Every night I practice a couple of scales and more importantly different picking styles and speeds. I do this as it hits me while watching tv on my telecaster unplugged. Doesn't wake anyone and it helps me to slow down. When alone and amped I practice scales, bends, pull offs and ons and always pinch harmonics. Then occaisional old song books to help me get in the mood or go online to a cite with music and join in. I try and keep it fun and relaxing. It's much better than going out and getting hammered in bars.
#9
Quote by jafell
It's much better than going out and getting hammered in bars.


you just haven't played enough gigs yet

but i guess i'm a bass player
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#11
Quote by cdgraves
The last set of any bar gig is where you really discover your weak spots.

I played gigs from fourteen to twenty two years old back in Austin, Temple and Waco , Texas and stayed drunk. I never plugged in without two shots of Wild Turkey with my lead player first. Quit playing in front of people at twenty two and was divorced around the same time. Moved into second life of completing college and moved into tax analysis during the S +L Scam period. Picked up a guitar thirty years later in Florida while waiting to give it to my son in Austin. I thought this conversation was about trying to stay inspired. I think it's different for everyone. My neighbor who is a professional buys a new high end guitar about once a month to stay happy. Others can go to the guitar store and run through new gear searching for the elusive tone they are always after. Everyone needs something to keep them smiling and for me just holding a nice guitar with a good neck and playing a little at night is inspiring especially while watching someone really in the groove on television. Or seeing someone live at a show that blows you out of your seat like Don Henley's new guitar player named Stuart Smith.

But now I am curious how the last set ia gig really shows your weeknesses. I have heard bands get cocky in the last set asking a bar croud to please try and stump them with something from a certain period because they are all hot that night and really don't want to go home. Thanks for putting up with the question
#12
Pick one thing and master it. Make sure you play that thing every day. You can noodle around too, but make this one thing your priority for at least three weeks. The thing could be anything really, a tricky song, a technique (like tapping or whatever), or a scale.
Use a metronome, and make sure it's one of those metronomes that goes up in increments of 1bpm. I spent too long with a Korg that goes up in increments of 4bpm, and I reckon it held me back on the technique front.
Also, if you're going to do 2 hours a day, then an hour in the morning and another hour in the evening is generally more effective than a two hour block.
Last edited by scarletcantos at Oct 30, 2015,
#13
Whether you work with one scale or a load of them, I'd suggest you get into phrasing (rhythm) ... that can make a huge difference to how your come across as a player. The "problem" with guitar is that there's no need to stop playing to breathe ... whereas something like sax forces phrasing to occur more naturally (ignoring circular breathing).

Make yourself a notebook of phrases you like (yours, other players (not just guitarists)) ... observe where they start and stop relative to the beat/bar. Observe how they build an idea ... keeping the phrasing roughly the same, but changing some of the notes. All adds to coherency in musical ideas.

Above all, keep in mind that practise is not all about mechanical technique!