#1
So last night I wanted to try out the Sonic Stomp with the rest of my gear, and because I'm out of pedalboard space I have the Sonic Stomp and the Analogizer backstage with my amp. I hooked them up with the 9v supply that came with the Sonic Stomp, daisy chaining from a 1-Spot brand 5 plug chain. All the power parameters matched from the supply unit, and the pedals match as well. Both pedals require low mA (>200mA), 9v, center negative, 60hz, etc. The supply unit puts out 200mA, 9v, center negative, 60hz.

But I ended up with a lot of noise/hum from the supply. I ended up trying just 9v batteries, and the noise was not present unless I put the Sonic Stomp on top the amp (EMI). I tried the Sonic Stomp adapter/chain again with the pedal on the ground but still got noise/hum. I then tried my actual Visual Sound 1-Spot with the same daisy chaining method and there was no noise.

What about the 1-Spot allows you to have a (relatively) noiseless operation? What is it about the Sonic Stomp's power supply that keeps it from wanting to be chained? I did notice that the 1-Spot brand supply takes in just .35 mA from the mains power. The Sonic Stomp supply takes 35 mA. What about wattage output of the adapter? Or do chains need a minimum mA rating? I thought I was good at this stuff.
Last edited by Will Lane at Aug 9, 2015,
#2
Quote by Will Lane
Both pedals require low mA (>200mA)
That would be called low current.
Quote by Will Lane
60hz
This depends on the mains, not the power supply.
Quote by Will Lane
The supply unit puts out 200mA
Not saying you need anything wrong, tho be aware that you need to make a sum of the power required by every pedal and then see if that is lower than what the power supply can supply.
Quote by Will Lane
But I ended up with a lot of noise/hum from the supply.
That's the power supply's fault.

Basically a power supply uses a filter to make sure the outgoing current is "clean", meaning steady in voltage, but some cheap ones don't care much about that, so they are not suited for audio applications 'cause they often produce noise.
Quote by Will Lane
I ended up trying just 9v batteries, and the noise was not present unless I put the Sonic Stomp on top the amp (EMI). I tried the Sonic Stomp adapter/chain again with the pedal on the ground but still got noise/hum.
It seems that the sonic stomp causes interference, and the first power supply you used was noisy.
Quote by Will Lane
I then tried my actual Visual Sound 1-Spot with the same daisy chaining method and there was no noise.

What about the 1-Spot allows you to have a (relatively) noiseless operation?
That means the second power supply you used was simply a better quality power supply.
Quote by Will Lane
What is it about the Sonic Stomp's power supply that keeps it from wanting to be chained?
The problem's caused by that particular power supply.
Daisy chaining adds a bit of noise to every supply, but the better the psu is the lower the noise will be, daisy chained or not.
The sonic maximizer doesn't like daisy chaining any more nor any less than any other pedal.
Quote by Will Lane
I did notice that the 1-Spot brand supply takes in just .35 mA from the mains power. The Sonic Stomp supply takes 35 mA. What about wattage output of the adapter?
Power is, among other things, current * energy, so W = A*V, or ampere * volt.

Current coming out of the mains is alternate, 60Hz @ 110v, so if the supply works by taking .35mA (which makes it .35*110=38.5mW) it's able to output up to 38.5mW, or 4.28mA @ 9v.

That makes little sense and the one spot website says it can output up to 1.7A, so you've likely found the wrong number
Quote by Will Lane
Or do chains need a minimum mA rating?
Chaining only means you need to output as much power as the sum of your pedal needs, so if you have two pedals requiring 20mA @ you need a psu that is able to supply 40mA @ 9v at least.
Quote by Will Lane
I thought I was good at this stuff.
I tried to make it clearer, but you might wanna read about basic electronics.
Name's Luca.

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Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#4
The sonic stomp power supply in not designed to run a daisy chain. It will only power the single OEM pedal @ 200mA 9VDC. Adding another pedal risks frying the power supply by drawing greater current than 200mA.

A One Spot is designed to run many pedals daisy chained. Different tools.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
Chances are the sonic stomp draws less than 20mA for complete operation, so... Its not really effective unit for guitar amps, for a PA sure. When you try it out in a band mix listen to your channel with and without the SS in your signal chain or rather what it does to the guitar sound in a band mix from an audience point of view up front in the crowd.

Regarding the 1spot, the noise issues can vary with that unit, some places it won't work & isolated supply will be needed. It does have better filtering than a generic 9V adapter when daisy chaining pedals. A isolated supply is a worthwhile investment.
#6
Quote by steven_ferns84
Chances are the sonic stomp draws less than 20mA for complete operation, so... Its not really effective unit for guitar amps, for a PA sure. When you try it out in a band mix listen to your channel with and without the SS in your signal chain or rather what it does to the guitar sound in a band mix from an audience point of view up front in the crowd.


What???

What could a device's mA draw possibly have to do with its sound through a guitar amp or PA? I have no use for a Sonic Stomp but audio application and mA 9VDC current draw are not related.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#7
^XD I think the Sonic Stomp is 7.7mA. I think many OD's are less than that...

I think that I was reading the .35mA power req on the 1 Spot wrong, was .35A most likely. So 350mA. At least I think I read it wrong... I checked a Harman power supply at the music store I work at and it read .3A intake. I'm going to try the adapter that comes with the Digitech Drop and see if that will work for me.

So the main difference between adapters made for pedal chaining and other 9v matched power supplies is the noise filtering when chained?

On that Harman power unit (PS0913DC-01) it has correct power matching for common 9v pedals and 1.3A available. Digitech's site doesn't say anything about chaining, it just lists a few of the pedals it can power. I want to be able to sell people a 1-Spot like adapter if they need one, we don't have any actual TrueTone 1-Spots in. I tried out the Harman supply a while back and didn't notice noise, but I should probably try again. Also I think the supply I get with the drop is that same Harman unit.
Last edited by Will Lane at Aug 10, 2015,
#8
Don't overthink it. When in doubt, always RTFM. "+9VDC min. 200mA"

From the BBE Sonic Stomp pdf owners manual:

Frequency Response: ............................................................Program

DependentBBE:Lo Contour .....................+12dB @ 50HzProcess ..................................................................+12dB @ 10kHzSignal to

Max Signal Level..........................................+7dBuInput Impedance: ...............................................................1MEG OhmsOutput Impedance: ............................................................1K Ohm* 0dBu = 0.775Vrms

Hardware Bypass ..................................................................YES

Power Requirement DC inlet: +9VDC min. 200ma

Battery Life............................................................15 hours Dimensions:........................... ..........................................3.7"(W) x 4.7"(D) x 1.8"(H)Shipping Weight: ...............................................................3.3 lbs.

Note: Due to continuing product improvement, specifications and design are subject to change without notice.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 10, 2015,
#9
Quote by Will Lane

I think that I was reading the .35mA power req on the 1 Spot wrong, was .35A most likely. So 350mA. At least I think I read it wrong... I checked a Harman power supply at the music store I work at and it read .3A intake.


LOL I thought that sounded wrong
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
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#10
Quote by Spambot_2
Power is, among other things, current * energy, so W = A*V, or ampere * volt.

Current coming out of the mains is alternate, 60Hz @ 110v, so if the supply works by taking .35mA (which makes it .35*110=38.5mW) it's able to output up to 38.5mW, or 4.28mA @ 9v.

That makes little sense and the one spot website says it can output up to 1.7A, so you've likely found the wrong number
As I try to understand the maths, you're calculating the AC current that the adapter uses, right? Also why mW? So .35A (350mA)*110=38.5W AC current. You can't just divide that by 9V DC to get DC mA from the AC current variables, can you? The AC/DC conversion hasn't happened? At that point, you'll never calculate to the 1.7A rating. Or at least I think so... still doing research I am.
Last edited by Will Lane at Aug 10, 2015,
#11
I have two pedals that seem to be very particular about their own power supplies only. One is my Digitech Vocalist II Harmonizer and the other is the BBE Sonic Stomp. I never took the time to find out why but they don't seem to play well with the other children in the daisy chain. ( I know the Digitech is 12V but it doesn't like other 12V adapters) I'm sure there is a reason but for those two I just use their included power supplies and let it go at that. I just got a new power supply with various outputs so I will try again.

AGPtek® 10 Isolated Output 9V 12V 18V
Attachments:
41rfTV0UUvL[1].jpg
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Aug 10, 2015,
#12
Quote by Will Lane
So the main difference between adapters made for pedal chaining and other 9v matched power supplies is the noise filtering when chained?
There is no difference.

One might say a psu "deisgned for daisy chains" will be able to supply more current, but it's exactly the same thing as whatever else power supply.
Quote by Will Lane
I tried out the Harman supply a while back and didn't notice noise, but I should probably try again. Also I think the supply I get with the drop is that same Harman unit.
Again, as long as the current the psu can supply is higher than the sum of the pedals' current demand then everything will work fine.
Well there's also polarity and voltage but I'm guessing these are obvious almost.
Quote by Will Lane
As I try to understand the maths, you're calculating the AC current that the adapter uses, right?
The current that the psu can draw from the mains.

It can actually draw more if pedals require it, but then you'll fry the transformer, so better to remain withing specs.
Quote by Will Lane
Also why mW?
1mA, or milliAmpere, is 1/1000 of an ampere, meaning you need 1000mA to make 1 ampere.
1mW, or milliWatt, is 1/1000 of an ampere.

.35mA, so .35/1000amp * 110v equals 38.5mW, so 38.5/1000 watt.
I used milliAmperes for the operation, so the result will be in milliWatt.
Quote by Will Lane
So .35A (350mA)*110=38.5W AC current.
The operation is right, tho you measure current in amperes, tension in volts and power in watts, so "38.5w AC current" makes no sense.

The current draw from the mains, which supply AC current, is 35mA, which results in 38.5w passing through the psu.

According to the calculations that is.
In reality, what I've described makes no sense.

You need a bigger transformer than that to bring down 38.5w from 110v to 9v.
I'm sorry, but you're probably mistaking something again
Quote by Will Lane
You can't just divide that by 9V DC to get DC mA from the AC current variables, can you?
Yes we can.

Don't even worry about AC or DC, that conversion is made using a very simple piece of circuit called rectifier (mesa's famous "rectifier" line of amps takes pride in using one, two or three tube rectifiers to convert AC to DC, which is part of what makes the low end sound so loose).
Quote by Will Lane
The AC/DC conversion hasn't happened?
The AC to DC conversion, which is called rectification, happens after the voltage has been changed when using almost all step down transformers (a transformer that lowers the voltage of a signal).

That doesn't change a signal's voltage, so don't worry about it.
Quote by Will Lane
At that point, you'll never calculate to the 1.7A rating. Or at least I think so... still doing research I am.
I'm guessing that may be at least partially made up, as most things marketed towards guitarists are.
Name's Luca.

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Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#13
i was actually quite happy with my 1 spot. i upgraded, and i must say i am happy with my upgrade....but it was probably a bit of an impluse buy. not sure my "super nice isolated" supply was that much quieter etc than my 1 spot. 1 spot really is a great product, and for the average old bro playin guitar, its a solid option. and they probably lead the market in mass produced lower end power supplies because of it. well deserved.


no offense, but ive had issues with every BBE pedal ive ever owned or tried. i dont take it as a coincidence people say the sonic stomp has issues with something. darn it why is it always BBE pedals involved with some "issue"....
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#14
Quote by Cajundaddy
What???

What could a device's mA draw possibly have to do with its sound through a guitar amp or PA? I have no use for a Sonic Stomp but audio application and mA 9VDC current draw are not related.

I was not talking about the sonic stomp's power draw affecting its sound through a guitar or pa amp, i was referencing the use of the pedal itself. I Should have had put a full stop somewhere in that sentence or started a new one on next para to avoid confusion .

Anyways, the data you quoted from the manual of the product gives you the manufacturer recommended safe max mA rating, very few manufacturers give the actual data consumption in the manual. RTFM doesnt help with all brands. Look at visual sounds tech specs on their site, they quote their pedals current draw from off to on state for example.
Last edited by steven_ferns84 at Aug 11, 2015,
#15
Quote by Rickholly74
I have two pedals that seem to be very particular about their own power supplies only. One is my Digitech Vocalist II Harmonizer and the other is the BBE Sonic Stomp. I never took the time to find out why but they don't seem to play well with the other children in the daisy chain. ( I know the Digitech is 12V but it doesn't like other 12V adapters) I'm sure there is a reason but for those two I just use their included power supplies and let it go at that. I just got a new power supply with various outputs so I will try again.

AGPtek® 10 Isolated Output 9V 12V 18V

Thats the joyo power supply, rebranded, its not isolated tranformer supply, the outlets a short circuit isolated only.
#16
Quote by steven_ferns84


Anyways, the data you quoted from the manual of the product gives you the manufacturer recommended safe max mA rating, very few manufacturers give the actual data consumption in the manual. RTFM doesnt help with all brands.


Negative.

"+9VDC min. 200mA" This means your power supply must provide at least 200mA current. A higher current rated power supply (like a One Spot) is also fine but not a lower rating or you risk frying the transformer or the pedal effect.

In order to use the owners manual effectively, you must first be able to understand the terms being used.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#17
Quote by Will Lane
So the main difference between adapters made for pedal chaining and other 9v matched power supplies is the noise filtering when chained?

On that Harman power unit (PS0913DC-01) it has correct power matching for common 9v pedals and 1.3A available. Digitech's site doesn't say anything about chaining, it just lists a few of the pedals it can power. I want to be able to sell people a 1-Spot like adapter if they need one, we don't have any actual TrueTone 1-Spots in. I tried out the Harman supply a while back and didn't notice noise, but I should probably try again. Also I think the supply I get with the drop is that same Harman unit.

I have made my own diy type psu using a generic 2A 12V adapter and then filter>voltage regulate>filter it to be as clean as possible to feed a daisy chain of pedals. The problem was with daisy chain increasing the hiss or giving a motor boating effect with say distortion pedal set high or a wah pedal with od involved at high boost and toe position. Increasing the filtering value after regulation helped lower the noise but still not very convinent since i had to go very high with the filter value meaning more bulky psu with traditional non smd components size.

I am guessing they have implemented sufficient filtering with a bunch of other stuff in the 1spot to keep the noise floor down, this isn't something common to all adapters since they vary with design for specific purpose related needs. Lately i made something similar to joyo linked somewhere above. It uses a bunch of voltage regulators feeding several individual outlets with their own filtering each, seems to be working for the moment for my needs although not isolated but dont get the noise issues from daisy chaining either.

Some pedals are just going to be noiser though when daisy chained. Digital pedals like delays are most common offenders introducing noise in that setup.
#18
Quote by Cajundaddy
Negative.

"+9VDC min. 200mA" This means your power supply must provide at least 200mA current. A higher current rated power supply (like a One Spot) is also fine but not a lower rating or you risk frying the transformer or the pedal effect.

In order to use the owners manual effectively, you must first be able to understand the terms being used.

You are wrong. It does not consume 200mA or anywhere near it. Have you ever checked a pedals power current supply using a meter before, especially those like digitech where the manual states things similar to what you quoted above? I have, i even asked them, the value given in rssponse was much higher then what the meter showed. Why? Same reason you mentioned, safety, so that people always supply more than necessary power to it so that the psu/adapter doesnt fry or the pedal isnt starved.

If you still dont understand what i'm getting at, contact bbe, tell them you have a trex fuel tank junior or a sanyou pedal juice, and you want to know if the sonic stomp is safe to run out of the trex outlet which has max 150mA rating, or what the pedal's power consumption is to calculate the total draw from the chain of pedals used with the sanyo juicer. I guarantee it wont be 200mA for the sonic stomp,heck it wont even be 100mA. Its unusual for it otherwise to work 15hrs on 9v battery with such high draw.
Last edited by steven_ferns84 at Aug 11, 2015,
#19
Quote by steven_ferns84
You are wrong. It does not consume 200mA or anywhere near it. Have you ever checked a pedals power current supply using a meter before, especially those like digitech where the manual states things similar to what you quoted above? I have, i even asked them, the value given in rssponse was much higher then what the meter showed. Why? Same reason you mentioned, safety, so that people always supply more than necessary power to it so that the psu/adapter doesnt fry or the pedal isnt starved.

If you still dont understand what i'm getting at, contact bbe, tell them you have a trex fuel tank junior or a sanyou pedal juice, and you want to know if the sonic stomp is safe to run out of the trex outlet which has max 150mA rating, or what the pedal's power consumption is to calculate the total draw from the chain of pedals used with the sanyo juicer. I guarantee it wont be 200mA for the sonic stomp,heck it wont even be 100mA. Its unusual for it otherwise to work 15hrs on 9v battery with such high draw.


So put a meter on it and post a pick to support your belief. Otherwise you got nuthin. I've been putting meters on electronics since 1969. I have no personal interest in anything BBE makes but I am pretty comfortable with reading their spec sheets. If they suggest 200mA minimum, that is probably what they mean. In the end, it is your effect pedal and your $$. Do whatever you want with it.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 11, 2015,
#20
Quote by Cajundaddy
So put a meter on it and post a pick to support your belief. Otherwise you got nuthin. I've been putting meters on electronics since 1969. I have no personal interest in anything BBE makes but I am pretty comfortable with reading their spec sheets. If they suggest 200mA minimum, that is probably what they mean. In the end, it is your effect pedal and your $$. Do whatever you want with it.

I would love to put a meter on it & give you the result, I dont have that pedal with me. What spec sheets? Can you post a link to a specific specs provided by BBE or are you referring to the manual they printed?

If you have been putting meters on electronics you should know by nowthe deal with printed electronic values on guitar pedals. With guitar manufactures do you think they all trust guitarists to have any electrical knowledge to know what is safe margin? Printing a arbitary value thats well above the safety line is easy way to make a unit idiot proof. I have measured pedals my self that required 300mA min power adaptor when the pedal consumed mere 60mA. This was the case of Digitech DF7 pedal, Have done the same with Electroharmonix Memory Boy that gave 32mA draw when the specs in teh manual says it draws 42-45mA max.

It was you who said I lacked the skills to read the manual or understand the terms in it when you aren't even willing to listen to what I'm trying to say.

Fine, so be it. I speak from personal experience with various pedals. I don't need to post pics, avoid listening to me if you need assurance.

My point is simple, the minimum value printed in that bbe manual is to avoid idiots from using low enough mA adaptor there by frying the said adaptor, unfortunately they fail to provide necessary specs like for instance, what is the power consumption of the pedal itself if 200mA is the minimum required headroom for the power adaptor. And this is specific to the Sonic Stomp pedal. BBE makes other pedals where there might be a draw in beyond 100mA range, thats where that 200mA rating will be useful.

EDIT: Here the manual for the pedal, they actually state the power consumption data in it, as I expected its less than 20mA current, hell its 7.7mA current draw lol http://www.bbesound.com/products/manuals/sonic_stomp_update_manual.pdf

Makes me wonder where DaddyO got his absurd value from
Last edited by steven_ferns84 at Aug 11, 2015,
#21
Steven do you always just make up this BS as you go along?? Give it a rest my friend.

"Chances are the sonic stomp draws less than 20mA for complete operation, so... Its not really effective unit for guitar amps"

"I was not talking about the sonic stomp's power draw affecting its sound through a guitar or pa amp,"

"Anyways, the data you quoted from the manual of the product gives you the manufacturer recommended safe max mA rating, very few manufacturers give the actual data consumption in the manual."

"You are wrong. It does not consume 200mA or anywhere near it."

Pics of you metering the BBE Sonic Stomp at full shred and only drawing 20mA or Ban!
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#23
Quote by Cajundaddy
"Chances are the sonic stomp draws less than 20mA for complete operation, so... Its not really effective unit for guitar amps"
Alright this was either bs or very unclear.
Tho...
Quote by Cajundaddy
"Anyways, the data you quoted from the manual of the product gives you the manufacturer recommended safe max mA rating, very few manufacturers give the actual data consumption in the manual."
This is true in most cases, and it is, as described, because people who manufacture stuff make up specs to appeal (in the case of power) guitarists, or in this case to be sure that an idiot guitarist doesn't **** stuff app because he thinks it's safe and the pedal will work even if he uses a psu that can't supply that much current.

If you've worked with electronics for so much time then you know it's unreasonable for an analog circuit that simple to need .2A @ 9v for operation.
Quote by Cajundaddy
"You are wrong. It does not consume 200mA or anywhere near it."
Well he did say the manual from bbe, which you can see online, states that the pedal consumes less than 8mA @ 9v, and the manual indeed states that, so what more do you need to believe it does?
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#24
^those quotes need fixing, most are mine but referenced to someone else lol

Will Lane, the TS, has two threads on the sonic stomp, so the part after "so..." was in reference to that, I figured he'd notice that. Unfortunately using a tablet & typing being a pain the remaining should had belonged on a new line. I did clear that up in the second response to this thread but didn't feel the need to go in great detal since its well didn't seem needed. The manual i have posted is the correct one from is from BBE site which is about 7.7mA draw. I'm not surev which bbe 'cajun' posted values for since the unit weight is wrong as well.

Edit:nevermind quotes are proper lol
Last edited by steven_ferns84 at Aug 11, 2015,
#25
Hehehehe. My manual says min 200mA. This manual is for the cherry red, simple type issue of the pedal. Another manual online, for the pedal with the curvy text, says 7.7mA.

I did notice that when the pedal is first turned on, it makes a loud pop through the speakers. A few more on/off clicks helps to remove the popping I guess through built up charges.

I did read a thread on Digitech's Hardwire stuff, a lot of those pedals take an inrush of current (~200, 300mA) when turned on before settling at their operating current (which is much lower and common, less than 100mA). So maybe that's what is going on with the Sonic Stomp.
#26
Quote by Will Lane
Hehehehe. My manual says min 200mA. This manual is for the cherry red, simple type issue of the pedal. Another manual online, for the pedal with the curvy text, says 7.7mA.

I did notice that when the pedal is first turned on, it makes a loud pop through the speakers. A few more on/off clicks helps to remove the popping I guess through built up charges.

I did read a thread on Digitech's Hardwire stuff, a lot of those pedals take an inrush of current (~200, 300mA) when turned on before settling at their operating current (which is much lower and common, less than 100mA). So maybe that's what is going on with the Sonic Stomp.

Thats what I meant when relying on manual published specs. The BBE website lists the sonic stomp manual both under current lineup as well as discontinued. Both lead to the same pdf i linked. The pop you get at startup is common with some true bypass pedals, is has to do with the capacitor charge, I can't go in detail about that.

That digitech hardwire pedal thread you mentioned is from TGP, right? A perfect example of dumb technical customer support or brilliant sales support. Notice how as the thread develops the tech stated value of inrush current goes from their own PS200R(?) adapter 300mA rating to 100mA. Interesting that tests were being conducted further on to determine this new value after the pedals were released for a long time. Simply put the easiest way for the digitech tech support to help a customer to cure a power related problem without delving deep into the issue(can't expect them to go deep with every single complaining customer though) was to suggest their own PSU. Easiest fix. Later on when pedal functions are questioned further, its changed to 100mA? Funny thing is when I had contacted them regarding the value of draw for the DF7, they said 90mA. Close enough to 100mA they are saying for the harwires, eh? I did not notice any inrush current changes either. It would have been very interesting if someone had measured the draw in that thread. I did not go through the whole thread so someone might have, in which case the 70mA is a mis print in the manual, making it digitech's fault the nonsense.

Anyways, now the primary issue of the OP according to me was actually using a onespot to power several digital pedals, most of them time based. When you do this you will get issues,weird sounding ones, this is where a isolated supply is needed. To those that were getting issues although not similar to the OP there and were using isolated supplies with enough headroom nearing 75mA(?) stated draw could very possibly have gotten malfunctioning units. Without using the companies stated PSU,a warranty claim can't be made & any issues can be forward to as been the source of wrong psu. Unless its the companies fault for creating a false sense of safety margin by publishing wrong specs. That's my take on the hardwire stuff from digitech.

As to your Sonic Stomp, as far as I know its an analog pedal, it would be interesting to know if it has an unsual draw at startup. I highly doubt it.
IMO

Edit: Does the manual you have use the term "power requirement" or "power consumption" or "current draw" is min 200mA?
Also to extend on the daisy chain thing, digital pedals most often draw more current than analog ones, on a onespot the more power hungry pedals you add, the max voltage can drop on the adapter side, atleast i experienced it in my projects. This means the digital pedals are starting to get less than the required voltage which in turn will start causing them to act up. Important note to mention would be the source adaptor being regulated or switching type. I'm guessing here that the onespot it a switch mode type.
Last edited by steven_ferns84 at Aug 11, 2015,
#28
Quote by Will Lane

I did read a thread on Digitech's Hardwire stuff, a lot of those pedals take an inrush of current (~200, 300mA) when turned on before settling at their operating current (which is much lower and common, less than 100mA). So maybe that's what is going on with the Sonic Stomp.


I hope not, I use several hardwires just on my harley benton adaptor, and it's only 120mA. They seem to work fine. It's digitech's fault if they don't, because they publish the current draws which are below 120mA (at least for the pedals I have).
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#30
I'm helping a friend fix his BBE Sonic Stomp and the first thing I noticed is that the power supply is centre negative. That's the start and finish of why it can't be daisy chained with anything except other centre-negative effects, like the original Fuzz Face with Germanium (not Silicon) transistors.

Most effects are centre-positive, meaning the centre pin carries the positive (+) DC charge and the outer shield is the ground. For whatever reason, and I don't see any PNP transistors inside that would call for it, the Sonic Stomp needs DC on the shield and a grounded centre-pin.

So either make sure your power supply is centre negative, or put a 9V battery in it.

Cheers,
-Eli.
#31
Quote by erobillard
I'm helping a friend fix his BBE Sonic Stomp and the first thing I noticed is that the power supply is centre negative. That's the start and finish of why it can't be daisy chained with anything except other centre-negative effects, like the original Fuzz Face with Germanium (not Silicon) transistors.

Most effects are centre-positive, meaning the centre pin carries the positive (+) DC charge and the outer shield is the ground. For whatever reason, and I don't see any PNP transistors inside that would call for it, the Sonic Stomp needs DC on the shield and a grounded centre-pin.

So either make sure your power supply is centre negative, or put a 9V battery in it.

Cheers,
-Eli.
Hehehe, most effects are center negative, friend. All 9 of the effects on my board are center negative.
Last edited by Will Lane at Mar 29, 2016,