#1
I have this http://www.globalmediapro.com/dp/A010J5/Behringer-VINTAGER-AC112-Guitar-Workstation/ - it has a custom celestion G12M-70 put into it..works 100% , mint..i need to sell it to afford my amp.. p.s i had it plugged in half way and went to unplug it and accidental grabbed the metal prongs of the plug while it was plugged in..i got electrocuted with 120 volts, an electrician said that is a fatal amount, so be carefull when you unplug your amps lol.
#2
Electrician is dumb.
Volts don't make electricity lethal, they just make it spark.

It's the Amperage that'll kill you.
#4
As to the amp's value... $50, maybe?

You'd be better off selling the speaker alone. The amp is worth next to nothing and most people looking for a cheap used starter amp aren't going to care or know anything about the speaker upgrade.
#5
50 is 2 low they go for 400 new iam seeing, how much would u value the celestion speaker at...sounds amazing..
#6
Quote by Frenetixx
50 is 2 low they go for 400 new iam seeing, how much would u value the celestion speaker at...sounds amazing..

You may "see" them online for $400, but nobody's paying that. That's not a real number.

The site you linked is selling for under 300 new. There are a few used online for 150 but I still think that's too high - you may eventually find a buyer at that price, but more likely you're going to wait a couple of months to sell it for anything over $100. Behringer amps do not keep their value well. They are notoriously cheaply made. $50 might sound low to you, but I think you're going to have trouble selling it for much more than that.

Perhaps you can find a greater fool to pay $100+ for it, but to me, $50 is what that amp is actually worth. It's not a desirable or popular model, it's not from a desirable brand. Your target market here are the uninformed who will "see" (as you did) that this is a "$400 amp" (it's not) and assume that $150 is a great price for it. Maybe you can find one of those people to sell to, but unless you're willing to sit around fielding emails from craigslist nutjobs for 3+ months, you may want to set your ask price around the $100 mark and be willing to come down from there.
#7
Don't know anything about the amp, but...

Yes, amps kill. It actually only takes 2mA to kill you. (Maybe 20, don't remember the exact number). However, higher voltage = more potential energy = higher possible current. You're body has a very large electrical resistance, so, by Ohm's Law, it takes a high voltage to push 2mA through your body.

Anyways, 120VAC won't kill you. It will hurt though. Rant over.

Sorry I didn't answer anything about the real question...
-Andrew H
band: syncopated groove punch
#8
The speaker is worth $30-$50 (that is for completed, sold ebay listings)
www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=celestion%20g12m-70&LH_Complete=1&LH_Sold=1&rt=nc&_trksid=p2045573.m1684

Your amp isn't even worth the $50 Roc was giving you credit for. The only completed, sold ebay listing was for $37.23
www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odkw=celestion+g12m-70&LH_Complete=1&LH_Sold=1&_osacat=0&_from=R40&_trksid=p2045573.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H1.Xbehringer+vintager+ac112.TRS0&_nkw=behringer+vintager+ac112&_sacat=0

So take the speaker out sell it separate and don't expect more than $100 for the pair when sold and you'll be just fine
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#9
Quote by fagelamusgtr
Don't know anything about the amp, but...

Yes, amps kill. It actually only takes 2mA to kill you. (Maybe 20, don't remember the exact number). However, higher voltage = more potential energy = higher possible current. You're body has a very large electrical resistance, so, by Ohm's Law, it takes a high voltage to push 2mA through your body.

Anyways, 120VAC won't kill you. It will hurt though. Rant over.

Sorry I didn't answer anything about the real question...



More people are killed by house current than any other. Never think for a second that 120VAC can't kill you.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#10
Quote by Arby911
More people are killed by house current than any other. Never think for a second that 120VAC can't kill you.

Yep 110-120v is one of the most dangerous because everyone discounts it so much and it is everywhere (in North America)
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#12
Quote by Arby911
More people are killed by house current than any other. Never think for a second that 120VAC can't kill you.

Of course it can. But the voltage is kind of the tiger's stomach of that danger, and the amps are the teeth.
#13
I agree with Darkwolf. The biggest shock I ever felt was a 12 volt DC shock I got while working on a car and moving one of the spark plug wires while the car was running. I felt that shock go up my arm and my hand was actually paralyzed for about 15 seconds after that. I couldn't move my fingers at all. It was real scary. Much worse than any AC current I ever got shocked by.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#14
Quote by Rickholly74
I agree with Darkwolf. The biggest shock I ever felt was a 12 volt DC shock I got while working on a car and moving one of the spark plug wires while the car was running. I felt that shock go up my arm and my hand was actually paralyzed for about 15 seconds after that. I couldn't move my fingers at all. It was real scary. Much worse than any AC current I ever got shocked by.


That wasn't 12vdc, it was from the ignition coil and the voltage can run as high as 40,000 volts, which is why it can jump the spark plug gap.

And you probably got shocked multiple times in rapid succession, depending on the engine and the RPM the engine was running at.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#15
That makes more sense. It was an incredible jolt. I saw that the wire was arcing out and sparking on the valve cover and like an idiot I reached down to move the wire. It will never happen to me again.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#16
Quote by fagelamusgtr
Don't know anything about the amp, but...

Yes, amps kill. It actually only takes 2mA to kill you. (Maybe 20, don't remember the exact number). However, higher voltage = more potential energy = higher possible current. You're body has a very large electrical resistance, so, by Ohm's Law, it takes a high voltage to push 2mA through your body.

Anyways, 120VAC won't kill you. It will hurt though. Rant over.

Sorry I didn't answer anything about the real question...


I'm quoting the most correct answer because a lot of people seem to have the misconception that volts aren't as important as amps. Fagelamusgtr is mostly correct, and for mostly the right reasons.

The Navy teaches their Electronics technicians to be aware of the following numbers:
Any voltage above 30 volts
Any amperage above 20 mA

Those aren't "kill" values. They just want to make certain that you're not underestimating the danger. Below either value it is extremely unlikely that a shock would kill a person, but it assumes a certain amount of resistance through the body. If you jabbed needles directly into your bloodstream and sent a current through your heart then either value could be enough to end your life.

You've probably seen an explanation that says something like "current kills!" and that's largely true, but current is dependent on voltage. Voltage is sometimes referred to as "potential" and potential is the best word for you to remember. The higher the voltage potential, the higher the current potential. Higher voltages are also more likely to overcome resistance. Air resists the movement of electricity, but a high enough voltage potential will arc across air. ANY material will conduct if you put enough potential behind it. The rubber gloves that you use to open high-voltage disconnects have voltage ratings too. I have a pair that's rated up to 19,000 volts (iirc).

I'm not trying to force-feed an electrical education to anyone. I just don't want anyone to have the wrong idea. It's not a good idea to brush off the voltage. I don't want anyone to think that 120v is "non-lethal", because 120v is dangerous enough for anyone. You have to respect it.
#17
Quote by paul.housley.7
I'm quoting the most correct answer because a lot of people seem to have the misconception that volts aren't as important as amps. Fagelamusgtr is mostly correct, and for mostly the right reasons.

The Navy teaches their Electronics technicians to be aware of the following numbers:
Any voltage above 30 volts
Any amperage above 20 mA

Those aren't "kill" values. They just want to make certain that you're not underestimating the danger. Below either value it is extremely unlikely that a shock would kill a person, but it assumes a certain amount of resistance through the body. If you jabbed needles directly into your bloodstream and sent a current through your heart then either value could be enough to end your life.

You've probably seen an explanation that says something like "current kills!" and that's largely true, but current is dependent on voltage. Voltage is sometimes referred to as "potential" and potential is the best word for you to remember. The higher the voltage potential, the higher the current potential. Higher voltages are also more likely to overcome resistance. Air resists the movement of electricity, but a high enough voltage potential will arc across air. ANY material will conduct if you put enough potential behind it. The rubber gloves that you use to open high-voltage disconnects have voltage ratings too. I have a pair that's rated up to 19,000 volts (iirc).

I'm not trying to force-feed an electrical education to anyone. I just don't want anyone to have the wrong idea. It's not a good idea to brush off the voltage. I don't want anyone to think that 120v is "non-lethal", because 120v is dangerous enough for anyone. You have to respect it.
You're mistaking 120V for 'mains supply'.
A Van Der Graaf generator can easily produce a high enough voltage to arc about 3 feet through the air, but while it will sting like a bitch, the current isn't nearly high enough to cause fibrillation.
#18
All this talk about voltage, amperage and etc. is largely academic.

Don't get shocked and you won't get killed by electricity. End of story.

It's not like there's some specific threshold that you should be trying for, just satisfy yourself with "no electrocution is good electrocution" and you will be fine.

As for the Navy, I learned these long ago...#7 is particularly appropriate...


The Ten Commandments of Electrical/Electronic Safety

I. Beware of the lightning that lurketh in seemingly uncharged
capacitors lest it cause thee to bounce upon thy buttocks in an
useamanlike manner and cause thy hair to stand on end, therby exceeding
regulation length.

II. Cause thou the switch that supplieth large quantities of juice to be
opened and thusly tagged, that thy days may be long in this earthly vale.

III. Prove to thyself that all circuits that radiateth and upon which
thou worketh are grounded and thusly tagged, lest they lift thee to radio
frequency potential and causeth thee to radiate with the angels.

IV. Tarry thou not amongst those fools that engage in intentional
shocks, for they are not long of this world and are surely unbelievers.

V. Take care thou useth the proper method when thou taketh the measure
of high voltage so thou dost not incinerate both thee and thy test
equipment. For verily, though thou hast no NSN (National Stock Number)
and can be easily surveyed, the test equipment has one, and as a
consequence, bringeth much woe to thy supply officer.

VI. Take care thou tamperest not with interlocks and safety devices, for
this incurreth the wrath of thy department head and bringeth the fury of
thy Commanding Officer on thy head.

VII. Work thou not on energized equipment without proper procedures, for
if thou dost so, thy shipmates will surely be buying beers for thy widow
and consoling her in ways not generally acceptable to thee.

VIII. Verily, verily, I say unto thee, never service equiment alone, for
electrical cooking is a slow process, and thou might sizzle in thine own
fat upon a hot circuit for hours on end before thy maker sees fit to end
thy misery and drag thee into his fold.

IX. Trifle thee not with radioactive tubes and substances lest thou
commence to glow in the dark like a lightning bug and thy wife be
frustrated and have no further use for thee except thy wages .

X. Commit thou to memory all the words of the prophets which are written
down in the 300th chapter of thy bible which is the 'Naval Ship's
Technical Manual' and giveth out with the straight dope and counseleth
thee when thou hast suffered a ream job by thy division LPO (Leading
Petty Officer).
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Aug 10, 2015,
#19
^

We had some messed up sayings as an AO also
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#20
Behringer's don't really have much resale value. Most people are honestly scared by the name. I'd say 50 bucks in a more competitive market.
Up here in Canada though, I've seen shit like that go for 100 bucks.
..I was watching my death.
#21
$30 usd on the left coast. Beringer's name is mud unfortunately except for a few older rackmount things.
#22
Quote by Arby911
All this talk about voltage, amperage and etc. is largely academic.

Don't get shocked and you won't get killed by electricity. End of story.

It's not like there's some specific threshold that you should be trying for, just satisfy yourself with "no electrocution is good electrocution" and you will be fine.

As for the Navy, I learned these long ago...#7 is particularly appropriate...


The Ten Commandments of Electrical/Electronic Safety

I. Beware of the lightning that lurketh in seemingly uncharged
capacitors lest it cause thee to bounce upon thy buttocks in an
useamanlike manner and cause thy hair to stand on end, therby exceeding
regulation length.

II. Cause thou the switch that supplieth large quantities of juice to be
opened and thusly tagged, that thy days may be long in this earthly vale.

III. Prove to thyself that all circuits that radiateth and upon which
thou worketh are grounded and thusly tagged, lest they lift thee to radio
frequency potential and causeth thee to radiate with the angels.

IV. Tarry thou not amongst those fools that engage in intentional
shocks, for they are not long of this world and are surely unbelievers.

V. Take care thou useth the proper method when thou taketh the measure
of high voltage so thou dost not incinerate both thee and thy test
equipment. For verily, though thou hast no NSN (National Stock Number)
and can be easily surveyed, the test equipment has one, and as a
consequence, bringeth much woe to thy supply officer.

VI. Take care thou tamperest not with interlocks and safety devices, for
this incurreth the wrath of thy department head and bringeth the fury of
thy Commanding Officer on thy head.

VII. Work thou not on energized equipment without proper procedures, for
if thou dost so, thy shipmates will surely be buying beers for thy widow
and consoling her in ways not generally acceptable to thee.

VIII. Verily, verily, I say unto thee, never service equiment alone, for
electrical cooking is a slow process, and thou might sizzle in thine own
fat upon a hot circuit for hours on end before thy maker sees fit to end
thy misery and drag thee into his fold.

IX. Trifle thee not with radioactive tubes and substances lest thou
commence to glow in the dark like a lightning bug and thy wife be
frustrated and have no further use for thee except thy wages .

X. Commit thou to memory all the words of the prophets which are written
down in the 300th chapter of thy bible which is the 'Naval Ship's
Technical Manual' and giveth out with the straight dope and counseleth
thee when thou hast suffered a ream job by thy division LPO (Leading
Petty Officer).
This is true.
#23
Quote by slapsymcdougal
You're mistaking 120V for 'mains supply'.
A Van Der Graaf generator can easily produce a high enough voltage to arc about 3 feet through the air, but while it will sting like a bitch, the current isn't nearly high enough to cause fibrillation.


I'm limiting the discussion to mains supply, because amps get power from the wall.

If you're interested in learning more about the subject then I'm sure you can find the information online, but please don't undermine a good safety message.