#1
Does each guitar have it's own original sound? Like if I had a Jackson and a Dean but everything else (strings, gear, pickups, etc) were the same would they still sound different? Does each body make it's own sound?
#3
Yes. Although there are plenty of distortion pedals that can effectively neutralize any subtle differences between guitars.
#4
^ Yeah.

Now, some things sound closer than others. If you have two superstrat-style guitars from different companies but which are broadly the same shape and which are made from the same woods and have the same hardware and pickups, they're probably going to sound fairly close. Whereas two totally different styles of guitar will sound very different.
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I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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#5
If all the hardware is the same than I'm going to disagree with the crowd and say that, with the exception of major construction differences like hollowbody vs. solid, the difference will be negligible running it through an amp. The nut, frets and bridge will account for about 99%* of what's delivered to the pickups, and the pickups determine about 90%* of what actually gets to the amp. Gain also acts to reduce the effect of basically all that except the pickups. If you have a hollow body or a lot of string between the bridge and tailpiece (as on a Jag) or unmuffled tremolo springs or something else that makes resonance a major factor, then that will matter, but otherwise the big issue is the contact points at either end of the sounding length of the string, how stable those contact points are, how stable the string is at those points, and whether it has room to vibrate.

Undoubtedly the body has a central role with hollow-bodied guitars, but practically I think that on a solidbody electric - when amplified - the body's material and design have an impact so small as to be an irrelevance, for the simple reason that solidbodies do not have soundboards. Soundboards are the reason that wood is important in hollow-bodied guitars. If something (besides the string) on a solidbody electric is vibrating to any meaningful extent, first of all it's not the body and second of all it's a Bad Thing in terms of "tone" - think Mustang saddles or basically anything on a Jag/Jazzmaster** or suchlike.

*Disclaimer: These percentages are completely fictional and are used only to give an impression of the relative unimportance of other factors.

**Also disclaimer: I'm not actually saying it's a bad thing in these cases - it contributes to iconic tones - but rather that the traditional view that sustain is good leads the saddles and bridges and extra string length of offsets to be the first thing players new to them complain about and the first thing that goes when people are trying to make them "better".

I spent a lot of time going through this to try and keep it within what I think is reasonable to say and reasonable to claim as being based on facts, so I'm aware that it turned out a little all-over the place and the words "hollow" and "body" both now seem really weird to me, but I hope what I say still seems fair.

That having been said, the horse has long since passed away, and its remains continue to suffer a continuous and brutal onslaught, so ultimately if you care you should be trying out guitars and not listening to people talk about it.
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#6
I'm also in the "yes but insignificant in the greater scheme things" camp. Logic (not always reliable as a source of fact) dictates that since these difference can be heard in acoustics, they should be present to some degree in solidbodies. However, I think they are overwhelmed by other variables in typical (eg not made out of papier mache) solidbodies. I can certainly hear some acoustic differences in some of the solidbodies I own, but I can detect no pattern in how this translates into electric sound. FWIW, these days I would choose on (light) weight, all else electronically being acceptable.
#7
2 of the exact same guitars can sound diffrent depending on set up, pickup hight, intonation, string type, or just diffrence in build quality.
#8
plugged in straight to an amp, yes, i think you can hear some tonal differnce/sustain.
once you start tossing pedals in the mix, to me its all effects at that point, and i couldn't tell if i was playing a 500$ or 3000$ guitar.
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#10
I say yes.

Personally I do feel the type of wood makes a big difference in the guitar sound. I'm still trying to decide how much of a difference weight and wood types make to sustain, but the type of wood definitely affects the frequencies that travel down the signal path from the guitar.

I think the amp is responsible for the majority of the sound though, the job of a guitar is just to inspire you and to play well. If it plays well, feels good and stays in tune, that's half the battle won. You can sort out the sound further down the signal path. A fantastic guitar through a poor amp sounds, uh, bad. Your run of the mill $20 pawn shop strat copy sounds very decent through a good valve amp. I've done both.
#11
I feel that when you buy a high end guitar you are paying for craftsmanship/longevity and possibly resale value. Other than that when the guitar is plugged in the body material/shape has no effect on what you here. These myths have helped Gibson and other wayyyy overpriced guitar companies to sell there products to uninformed people with plenty of money. Now the quality and craftsmanship is whats worth money. Given a genre of music i can make a 100 dollar guitar sound better than a custom shop les paul with a setup and some electronics upgrades, but i cannot make it last as long or play as nice (in most cases lol) without serious reconstructive work to the 100 dollar axe.
#12
And to the guy up there that said pickups make up 90% of what goes into the amp, Sorry man reacalculate that because they are 100% responsible. What happens when a pickup is dead? No sound at all.
#13
Quote by Dick Savage
And to the guy up there that said pickups make up 90% of what goes into the amp, Sorry man reacalculate that because they are 100% responsible. What happens when a pickup is dead? No sound at all.

Well yes Pickups are responsible for 90%* of the character of said signal. In that the same pickups in different guitars will go the majority of the way to getting the same sound.

*This number remains wholly fictional bullshit intended only to make a point.
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#14
I see what you did there lol.... but yea i knew what you were trying to say. The pots, nut, and bridge will make a difference if i ly a slight one.
#15
Quote by Dick Savage
And to the guy up there that said pickups make up 90% of what goes into the amp, Sorry man reacalculate that because they are 100% responsible. What happens when a pickup is dead? No sound at all.


hahahaha
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#16
Quote by xcamero360
Does each guitar have it's own original sound? Like if I had a Jackson and a Dean but everything else (strings, gear, pickups, etc) were the same would they still sound different? Does each body make it's own sound?


maybe. being a strat guy pretty much sums things up. the strat is still probably the most copied design out there. when the pickups etc are the same many copies or even different fender models do sound very similar. on the other hand many can also sound very different. guitars can be very individual in sound and feel even within the same model. that's part of the appeal i guess. just because i play a strat doesn't mean that i will automatically sound like hendrix or SRV (wish i did though).
#17
One variable of the reason for this is SRV used the ground cables on power poles for strings!
#18
Quote by Dick Savage
One variable of the reason for this is SRV used the ground cables on power poles for strings!

I think that one falls somewhere between Robert Johnson selling his soul to the devil and EVH inventing guitar tab
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#19
Yea, i may have stretched that one a bit! But seriously they were immensely thick.
#20
Quote by Dick Savage
Yea, i may have stretched that one a bit! But seriously they were immensely thick.

That they were! But I think his sound had more to do with the way he thwacked the lot of them with just about every note; I've been trying to learn to do that well for a looooooong time.

I guess I shouldn't've taken your post seriously, only the distressing thing is I have seen people seriously claim that Stevie scavenged strings from ridiculous places. I've also seen a bloke claim he used 17 and 18 gauge sets (for the record, I believe 13s were his usual and 11s his lower limit, correct?)
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#21
Yea, i beleive 13s were his usual and ge wouldnt play anything less than 11s. But i am pretty certain that he would regularly use both low E and A strings from an extremely thick set of acoustic strings.
#22
Yes the body shape and type of wood make a difference. Otherwise I could get a HSS Strat, stick a Burstbucker in the bridge and presto - Strat and Les Paul in one guitar.
#23
Quote by Jack Strat
Yes the body shape and type of wood make a difference. Otherwise I could get a HSS Strat, stick a Burstbucker in the bridge and presto - Strat and Les Paul in one guitar.

Well I mean there's about 10 more important factors to consider, but you do you.
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#24
Yea that dosent mean wood has anything to do with it. The tonal difference will always be there because of different scale length not to mention other factors.