#1
I recently bought myself a "proper" guitar, which was neat, and I'm looking at replacing my (I'm sorry) MG with something (much) nicer, and I really like the look (or sound, rather) of the Fender '68 Custom amps, but since they all cost an arm and a leg by my standards, I need something that I can be confident (wishful thinking, right?) will be adequate for anywhere I may end up playing in the next several years at least.

On account of I know what sound I'm after and the money will have to be scraped together, my choices are basically:
  • Princeton Reverb 1x10, 12w (Pretty sure this is too small, more importantly I like the two channels on the other '68 Customs)
  • Deluxe Reverb 1x12, 22w (I think this is the one; enough power to be getting on with, but low enough it can be overdriven without dust falling from the ceiling)
  • Vibrolux Reverb 2x10, 35w (Basically if the Deluxe isn't enough I think this will probably be the solution; assuming 10 inch speakers are fine for guitar?)
  • Twin Reverb 2x12, 85w (I'd love a Twin, but first of all I couldn't in any reasonable setting overdrive it, second of all I'm 60kg at 5'9 and literally none of that is muscle. Also, if I was going down this route I'd probably be looking used, and then probably silverface, which obviously has its various concerns)


Basically, I'm assuming that I could play mic'd up in just about any gigging situation; I want to know if the Deluxe would have enough headroom to stay clean at gigging volumes and if it could compete with a drummer in rehearsal.
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#2
Of those four, I would take the Vibrolux 2x10. 10's are great for guitar - Fender has used 10's in a lot of their amps historically. And I am firmly of the opinion that two speakers are better than one. You'll get a bit more sound spread and depth from the two speaker option.

As for the wattage scenario - I don't think it will factor in much as all of these should be able to be pushed pretty hard and stay clean, but the Vibrolux amps have a custom "modified bassman tone stack" channel on them that lets them get dirtier at a usable volume.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#3
I really dislike the 10's, but it's a matter of preference I guess.

22w is pretty limit to me. 35w is more of an approriate compromise. I have a Fender Blues Deluxe which is 40w and I'm pretty content with the headroom, altought I woulnd particularly recommend this amp.
#4
depends on how clean we're talking and how loud you drummer is. what style of music are we talking about as well? i'd highly suggest using a stand of some sort for your amp so you can hear it on stage. i think in many little club situations you'd be fine. outdoor gigs or really big rooms might push you a bit but as long as you have it mic'd and have a good monitor setup you should be fine. have you looked at a Peavey Classic 30 that might be a good alternative and be a bit more flexable on top of it.
#5
I would go 112, for tonal reasons, so Deluxe Reverb. However, my amp tech mate recently bought a Princeton. I gigged for years with a Classic 30, then a Blues Deluxe. I wasn't wild about the BD, because it has very little clean headroom, it just got more compressed as you turned the volume up; I reckon it was only about 4w on the clean channel. The Classic 30 was better.
#6
Fenders are pretty standard and while I personally would consider 22W sort of at the bottom of the range of amps I'd want to use to try to hang with an aggressive drummer, it may work.

I use combo amps ranging from around 40W - 100W in that situation. One favorite is a Carvin Belair (2x12, 50W EL84-based amp), but I have several others including a 50W 6L6 amp and a 100W EL34-based amp. The 100W amp has a single 12" speaker in an open back combo, the Belair is a 2x12 open back combo and the 50W 6L6-based amp is an oversize closed back cabinet with ports.
#7
22 watts is not very much for a clean channel , if you need a clean channel .... the Twin won't overdrive , but takes pedals beautifully so that's about a wash , my Twin Reverb and Super Reverb are my favorite Fender amps
#10
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I recently bought myself a "proper" guitar, which was neat, and I'm looking at replacing my (I'm sorry) MG with something (much) nicer, and I really like the look (or sound, rather) of the Fender '68 Custom amps, but since they all cost an arm and a leg by my standards, I need something that I can be confident (wishful thinking, right?) will be adequate for anywhere I may end up playing in the next several years at least.

On account of I know what sound I'm after and the money will have to be scraped together, my choices are basically:
  • Princeton Reverb 1x10, 12w (Pretty sure this is too small, more importantly I like the two channels on the other '68 Customs)
  • Deluxe Reverb 1x12, 22w (I think this is the one; enough power to be getting on with, but low enough it can be overdriven without dust falling from the ceiling)
  • Vibrolux Reverb 2x10, 35w (Basically if the Deluxe isn't enough I think this will probably be the solution; assuming 10 inch speakers are fine for guitar?)
  • Twin Reverb 2x12, 85w (I'd love a Twin, but first of all I couldn't in any reasonable setting overdrive it, second of all I'm 60kg at 5'9 and literally none of that is muscle. Also, if I was going down this route I'd probably be looking used, and then probably silverface, which obviously has its various concerns)


Basically, I'm assuming that I could play mic'd up in just about any gigging situation; I want to know if the Deluxe would have enough headroom to stay clean at gigging volumes and if it could compete with a drummer in rehearsal.


I have owned and/or gigged with all of them. If you like Fender tone these are hard to beat. Maybe add the SuperChamp X2 and Blues Jr. to your choices to save a little $$.

"Will it be enough" really depends on the music you play. IMO the Princeton had aweome BF tone but a very inefficient speaker so it wasn't loud enough to stand alone for full rock band. I gig frequently with a SuperChamp XD (15w 1x10) which is a lot like the Princeton tonewise but with more voices and more efficient speaker. It will run with the loudest drummers for Surf tunes like Wipe Out and Miserlou and that is good enough for me. Basic rule with this amp: If they mic the drums they mic the amp. No worries.

The Deluxe Reverb is a sweet spot and one of the most gigged amps of all time. Yes it is probably enough unless you are covering Metallica or Pantera. Wrong amp for these. The amp voicing and cabinet size are just right for great Fender guitar tone in most gigs.

Vibrolux Reverb is pretty sweet too and significantly louder than the Deluxe with 2 x10. Sometimes way too loud for smaller gigs.

Twin Reverb is the volume champ and is just complete overkill for most gigs IMO. It sounds much like the awesome BF Princeton but is capable of nearly 130 db wide open. Nobody wants to hear that thing wide open any more. Those of us who used em all have tinnitus now. Too freaking loud to be worth dragging 85 lbs of it all around town. Get a smaller amp and mic it as needed.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 10, 2015,
#11
let me tell you right now - if you are talking power tube overdrive...in the sense of "overdriven tube amp"..

just get this straight.

very very very few, if any tube amps, can be actually overdriven in a household setting without being VERY loud. if so, your whole house will hear, you live on a farm, or have a basement.

contenders are vox lil night train (2 watts), vox ac4 (down to 1/4 watt) etc. and they are specifically DESIGNED to break up easily, they use a tiny pre-amp sized tube as a power tube.

i owned a DV Mark lil 40 which was down to 1/4 watt but still had EL-34 POWER TUBES, and i could sound like angus young, but the neighbors called the cops.

quite simply, it is the DESIGN. NOT WATTAGE. if you have 6l6s, El-34s, etc or some normal tubes, teh amp will not naturally overdrive at "non gigable" volumes without some tricks (design, an attentuator, or some great built in power soak).

basically, none of the amps you listed will overdrive at an acceptable house volume.

_________

okay. now that thats said, if you are referring to getting a good PREAMP overdrive channel tone at reasonable volumes, perhaps yes.

i finds again, DEISGN and speaker / cab configuration can make a huge difference on sounding good at low volumes. something like the taper on teh pots used for the volume knob can make a big affect (that 1-10 feeling, or a nice clean even sweep).

i wouldnt feel like too low is too little. what type of music are you playing and did you gig? given you are looking at a fender, im guessing you dont play death metal and perhaps some rock / bluesy vibe? chances are even you will mic the amp up and you can crank it for stage volume and overdrive.

some of the sweetest tones have been had from a low wattage driven fender, such as under 20 watts. recordings for aerosmith, eagles etcs have all been les pauls through a driven tweed. heck, Slash used an ac30 over driven as heck for some velvet revolver songs.

so i wouldnt feel like low wattage cant cut it. the debate is HEADROOM. and if you want power tube crunch, you want that lower wattage. and yes, even 12 watts will be LOUD...call the cops loud, you will never max it out loud (unless you play arenas or speedmetal or something and you can get up and over massive double kick drums, huge bass setups with huge speaker cabs, and another rythym guitarist running a 4x12 speaker cab with a massive low end amp like a dual recto etc.)

i know a career musician who just invested in a custom hand wired boutique amp, cost him 4000 bucks. its 12 watts. its his only amp. he tours with it. its amazing.
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#12
Thanks for the advice, everyone. I've found a shop selling a used '65 RI Twin for about the same price as a new '68 Custom Deluxe would cost, and I'm probably going for that, on account of I think the Deluxe was probably a somewhat misguided compromise. A Fender through a Twin Reverb is the rig I've wanted for a long time and it's probably a bad idea to make a compromise so close to what I actually want.

The other advantage of a Twin is that I'm going to university in a year's time and I'd feel pretty safe bringing a Twin, on account of it'd take a pretty hench thief to nick all 30kg of that
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#13
Make sure you're insured.

As long as you take proper precautions, you should be safe, but it never hurts to be able to make a claim and get your stuff replaced. Accidents happen, as do fire & flood.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#14
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Make sure you're insured.

As long as you take proper precautions, you should be safe, but it never hurts to be able to make a claim and get your stuff replaced. Accidents happen, as do fire & flood.


All of that stuff falls under house insurance, and typically that's the first thing you get after the house. Having said that, it does not cover you if you are out playying a gig. You need commercial insurance which is a lot more expensive.
#15
Sure. But not everyone has a house. Renter's insurance also covers losses in your domicile, though.

Best insurance when gigging or studying, though? Extra sets of friendly eyes.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#16
Quote by dannyalcatraz


Best insurance when gigging or studying, though? Extra sets of friendly eyes.


You mean, Cesar, my trusty pitbull Set of friendly jaws as well

OP - great choice, I was going to suggest that amp.

As far as insurance - talk to your agent, renter's and homeowner's insurance cover most of it but I think it is above the deductible. Check with local musician union, they usually have group rates on specialized insurance.