#1
More specifically the effects used on the main guitar melody playing in the song "Pet sounds" from the album "Pet sounds"
Its almost like a steel drum sound, maybe a little bit of spring reverb in there too but i need a more trained ear in this field thanks.
#3
That’s probably four musicians playing the part on four different guitars simultaneously. Mic each guitar but keep them close enough to get bleed between all four mics. And use a room mic. Then mix it all together. That’s how Phil Spector and Brian Wilson got those amazing tones.
#4
Quote by jpnyc
That’s probably four musicians playing the part on four different guitars simultaneously. Mic each guitar but keep them close enough to get bleed between all four mics. And use a room mic. Then mix it all together. That’s how Phil Spector and Brian Wilson got those amazing tones.

Yep. Probably one or two 12-string electrics in that mix as well.
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#5
That tone is completely drenched in spring reverb, and the chorus/vibrato type effect sounds like the guitar is running through a leslie cabinet, to me. Or it might even be the guitarist wobbling a bigsby tremolo while playing and the kind of "shimmering" effect could be caused by the pitch modulation causing some cool phase cancellation with the reverb. I don't think it's a chorus or flanger pedal or anything like that, as I don't think any even existed at the time it was recorded.

Other than that, it's just a very open, uncompressed clean sound, with quite a lot of treble.
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#6
Quote by Blompcube
That tone is completely drenched in spring reverb, and the chorus/vibrato type effect sounds like the guitar is running through a leslie cabinet, to me. Or it might even be the guitarist wobbling a bigsby tremolo while playing and the kind of "shimmering" effect could be caused by the pitch modulation causing some cool phase cancellation with the reverb. I don't think it's a chorus or flanger pedal or anything like that, as I don't think any even existed at the time it was recorded.

Other than that, it's just a very open, uncompressed clean sound, with quite a lot of treble.

That might not be how they recorded it, but it might be useful in recreating it - especially if you're going to try with just the one guitar.
#7
It's always tough to isolate any one sound on many of that mid period Beach Boys stuff because as mentioned above it's most often several different instruments playing a single part. Brian would have several regular six string players doing the same part and have Tommy Tedesco or Glenn Campbell playing a 12 string on the same part. Brian loved to mix sounds like harmonicas playing the same line as twin accordions or Carol Kaye doing a bass line on an electric bass that is being doubled on an acoustic upright bass or even organ bass pedals. Lots happening on those records and since Brian is deaf in one ear he mixed a lot of stuff in mono so it blends even more.
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#8
Sounds like a Leslie and that is what they attribute it to. A lot of unique instruments were used on this recording.

I like to read about the songwriting and recording process with epic albums like this, Sgt. Pepper, and Thriller.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pet_Sounds#
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#9
I share Cajundaddy's interest in "the making of" various albums. Even if it's an artist I'm not very fond of I like it when they "talk tech" about how the songs were recorded. Those VH1 Classic Album DVD's are really good especially the ones on Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of The Moon" and Queen's "Night at the Opera". I probably have watched the one on Steely Dan's "Asia" 10 times now. There is a wealth of information about recording,arrangeing and other aspects of making an album. Even if you don't care much for Steely Dan it's great.
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#10
Quote by Blompcube
That tone is completely drenched in spring reverb, and the chorus/vibrato type effect sounds like the guitar is running through a leslie cabinet, to me. Or it might even be the guitarist wobbling a bigsby tremolo while playing and the kind of "shimmering" effect could be caused by the pitch modulation causing some cool phase cancellation with the reverb. I don't think it's a chorus or flanger pedal or anything like that, as I don't think any even existed at the time it was recorded.

Other than that, it's just a very open, uncompressed clean sound, with quite a lot of treble.


pedals for flange and chorus didn't exist then but both were studio fx first. flange gets its name literally from the tape reel whose sides are called flanges. the effect was done by pushing down on the tape reel slightly to slow it down giving the "flange" effect. the chorus effect is most likely a leslie cabinet. spring reverb most likely and perhaps some tremelo as well.