#1
I've just finished building a guitar and i want to do it again, ive got this idea of 'black and blue' stuck in my head so that's all i'm thinking about, just wondering which, if either, of these ideas you prefered.
(Both strat style)

1. Black body, blue pickguard, black pickup covers, knobs, switch tip, ebony fretboard, blue tuning pegs
2. Blue body, black pickguard, blue pickup covers, knobs, switch tip, ebony fretboard, blue tuning pegs
I also want blue inlays but i don't think i'd be able to do that..

Thanks
#2
blue inlay decals exist from japan and mexico on ebay, they last a really long time i find

sperzel trim-lok tuners you can get many colors such as blue
blue or black pickguards ...or light / dark blue pearl pickguards or black pearl exist
black pickup covers try ebay
.. in fact a majority of this exists on ebay

you can probably get black and blue pickups from guitar fetish , perhaps dimarzio or guitarheads.net , i've seen blue pickup covers for single coils on ebay too so lots of options

ebony tuning pegs exist too, they are an after market swap , but you might as well go with maple tuner knobs and dye them blue and re-finish them. tedious but a signature look none the less

don't forget about
black pickguard screws - ebay
blue or black strap locks on ebay
qparts.com - lots of custom blue / black parts
DR has some blue coated strings - they sound like crap though
axetremecreations.com for the coolest fake blue abalone pickguard i've seen
#3
All of the stuff for my first build came from ebay i think except for the pickups which i got from guitar fetish.
Didn't think about decals for the inlays, cheers.
What do you think would be the best way to get a black neck, spray? stain? Ive heard of people just colouring in a rosewood fretboard with a black perminant marker.
Thanks for all the help
#4
I wouldnt recommend trying to change tge color of rosewood by unnatural mean.....will lead to trouble. But what you can do is once your finished with the guitar right before you string it up rub some lemon oil on the fret board which will darken it up alot. They also make a ebony stain that will will damn near black it out i think you can get it from stew mac and its ass simple as wipe on wipe off with a rag.
#5
^Yeah, I think the best way to blacken a rosewood board is by staining it.

If I'm honest I think a blue pickguard on black would look awful. A black pickguard on blue isn't something I'd personally go for (except with sonic/daphne blue, but I guess that's probably lighter than you're thinking) but I think it'd look pretty good overall.


Just some Google Images examples:








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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Aug 11, 2015,
#6
I've tried black perminant marker and it's a bad idea it gets sticky use shoe polish for the fretboard or some sort of dye. Someone can suggest some on here. My bc rich beast has been "ebonized' which is when you dye a fretboard black i got it used and scalloped it and it's still black as the night

black automotive spray paint does wonders and then brush over it with some polyurethane or varnish (gunstock oil , linseed oil , tung oil). Gloss = super shiny , semi-gloss sort of shiny or satin isn't shiny. Usually satin is found on guitars.

to sand the polyurethane make sure it's cured (hardened) and sand until it's smooth so usually i go to 2000 grit to make it as smooth as glass but I suppose 800 - 1000 are fine too. If you got fine scratches from the 1000 grit when you look in the light polishing compound (Turtle wax) at first and then a swirl and scratch remover (turtle wax or meguiars I've used) on two different sides of a rag do wonders. Interesting fact you can use Caranuba car wax to make guitars look brand new. This one is just to make the guitar shine. Silicone free you'd want to shoot for like turtle wax super hard shell. But with that kind keep it away from the hardware of a guitar and use a tiny bit. I use it before I take photos of guitars I sell. I'm no luthier but it helps with photos.

but lets see some second opinions on sanding a painted neck, brush on polyurethane i'd highly recommend over spray on. All the stuff mentioned is in the automotive section in a hardware shop. In canada practically all the same aisle these days.

good luck on the project

this was the pickguard idea, expensive but oh so awesome, there is backplates like it too
http://www.axetremecreations.com/custom-shop-pickguards/custom-stratocaster-pickguards/Stratocaster-Pickguard---Blue-Green-Faux-Abalone

here's a potential preview minus the black hardware and pickups. This was during a project before i finished it. I'd say go for it, it's going to look unique I'm so sick and tired of white pearl , I made 1000s of dollars selling white pearl to the point if i actually own a fender and keep it i'll never bother with white pearl.
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Aug 11, 2015,
#7
Marty friedman played a black and blue musicman i beleive in the 80s? Could be wrong about that. But i would absolutly 100% never ever recommend painting a rosewood fretboard. There are many reasons for this ill not even list them. And carnauba wax is what i use on all my builds that arent oil finished. That and a mothers power ball on a drill followed by a rag rub of once a year automotive polish. And not to be rude but only in canada will you find a can of "brush on" polyurethane in the automotive section. Which in anycase it is best to spray any type of clear finish other than oil, because you get much more uniform even coverage with spray opposed to brush. This is crucial especially on a neck where the feel can be greatly affected by uneven finishes. The painting of the rosewood board though us just purely bad advice though in my humble opinion.
#9
Quote by Dick Savage
But i would absolutly 100% never ever recommend painting a rosewood fretboard. There are many reasons for this ill not even list them.

Maybe I'll regret this after discovering how mundane they are, but might I ask what some of those reasons are?
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#10
Well automotive paint weather it laquer or eurethane or heaven forbid enamel it will not fill the many large pores in the rosewood therefore it will chip off around those pores. Another thing is that with playing over time the paint will rub and wear on the fretboard making it feel and look terribe (think of the look of a highly worn maple neck except from paint). The worst drawback is that rosewood is exceptionally oily wood especially after all tgose pores we talked about are filled with body oils, dead skin, dust, and other foreign materials and there's no good way to clean the pores deep enough to preven some kind of paint rejection or absurd wear rate after painted. You could possibly paint ine if time was taken to seal the pores of the board and then paint over that but you still have the oil to contend with and thats not gonna cut it. Basically your gonna be headed for a major heartbreak painting rosewood. Its just ine of those things you dont do.
#12
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If you can choose for guitar is made for foreign material and condition about that.


What?
#13
Quote by csawyer97

1. Black body, blue pickguard, black pickup covers, knobs, switch tip, ebony fretboard, blue tuning pegs
2. Blue body, black pickguard, blue pickup covers, knobs, switch tip, ebony fretboard, blue tuning pegs
I also want blue inlays but i don't think i'd be able to do that..


You might want to take a gander at this very blue Kiesel/Carvin guitar that has a quilt maple cap AND back (over a different body wood) plus a quilt maple facing on the headstock AND on the back of the headstock, and a maple fretboard with some crazy figuring (burl?), and all of it BLUE.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icmXVbJvyLQ

I wouldn't know anything about blue inlays in a zebrawood fretboard (Carvin, again):



Maybe this one will give you some inspiration?



Oh hell. Just save up the bucks and buy a Carvin.