#1
Hi there, all!

As the title already says, I'm looking for some good tips and topics to start out with for my new students, this year.
I've teached guitar before and I really like it.
Does some of you teach guitar too - please let me know what you do and what I can do to improve my teaching along the way!

THANKS!
#2
Kind of a silly question, if you already teach guitar you should know how to do it

I don't teach anything, but I'll give you my opinion as a student who never really found the right teacher.

The most important thing I've ever learned from a teacher is correct posture and hand placement. That's something that is easy to get wrong on your own. You should probably also use a metronome in class whenever it is applicable.

And you could try not using any tabs on your lessons, and instead teach your students either via notation or example. I've had the problem before that a teacher just put a tab sheet in front of me and told me to learn it, before moving on to the next. That sucked. So try to make them learn by ear.

Rhythm and ear are in my opinion the most important factors in great guitar playing, so just make sure your students won't ignore them. Or don't, I'm no one to tell you what to do. Just listing things that I wish I was taught properly.
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#3
Quote by Kevätuhri

And you could try not using any tabs on your lessons, and instead teach your students either via notation or example.


I respectfully disagree... I think that using notation can lead the student to frustration and loss of interest. Unless of course he/she is willing/asked to learn it.
Also, I do think that notation, as useful as it can be for composing, is not really that useful for guitar playing.
I mean, I am for learning as much as possible by ear (even if I'm not that good at it ), but definitely give the student some paper/document so he can study the material if he forgot some part of it, and TAB is a great way to do this.
I'm checking what I learned from my tachers in the past years and in what order, and having had one of them who never gave me much documentation about what we learned during the lessons is not that good
I may be wrong of course .


I agree on the rest, especially on the "rhythm and ear" part, which seems to be so often forgotten by teachers.

I also think that involving the student actively by giving them specific exercises to write some music or just be creative in applying concepts can be a very good way to keep them interested and curious about music.

Of course it's just my opinion.
#6
Quote by Kevätuhri

And you could try not using any tabs on your lessons, and instead teach your students either via notation or example. I've had the problem before that a teacher just put a tab sheet in front of me and told me to learn it, before moving on to the next. That sucked. So try to make them learn by ear.


the beautiful thing about guitarpro and similar tab services is that you can pair the SN and the tabs, using one to explain the other gradually, and then you can altogether take the tab out of the equation. same with ear training

but that's kind of an approach you'd need to take on the very, very long-term, as that kind of mastery would take years that most people don't intend to spend on learning a hobby they just wanna use to impress girls
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#7
I teach jazz-blues and fusion..my first question to a new student of jazz.."what do you mean by jazz" next question..what if any, are your goals..

I then asses the students abilities-musical background..what they listen to..what they can now play comfortably..do they understand what they are playing - do they know any theory etc.. then build lessons around that..so its not foreign material that takes months to digest..then its simple extensions to what they already know-to keep the interest level high..
play well

wolf
#8
Quote by PedalFreak94
Hi there, all!

As the title already says, I'm looking for some good tips and topics to start out with for my new students, this year.
I've teached guitar before and I really like it.
Does some of you teach guitar too - please let me know what you do and what I can do to improve my teaching along the way!

THANKS!


Keep teaching. Part of becoming a good teacher is discover what your style is, how you communicate with your students, and that can only come with more time and exposure to teaching. I've been teaching for so long, I can do it in my sleep, but that's because it's refined to where I've learned what works and what doesn't and what I could explain better and so on. You get better at it by doing it. I'm a different teacher now than I was 10 years ago.

I truly believe you have to go out there and learn your lessons by teaching and sometimes failing, and refining your craft.

Best,

Sean
#9
Quote by Sean0913
Keep teaching. Part of becoming a good teacher is discover what your style is, how you communicate with your students, and that can only come with more time and exposure to teaching. I've been teaching for so long, I can do it in my sleep, but that's because it's refined to where I've learned what works and what doesn't and what I could explain better and so on. You get better at it by doing it. I'm a different teacher now than I was 10 years ago.

I truly believe you have to go out there and learn your lessons by teaching and sometimes failing, and refining your craft.

Best,

Sean


I totally agree! Developing your teaching skills over time is as important as developing your playing and creative skills.
#10
Quote by wolflen
I teach jazz-blues and fusion..my first question to a new student of jazz.."what do you mean by jazz" next question..what if any, are your goals..

I then asses the students abilities-musical background..what they listen to..what they can now play comfortably..do they understand what they are playing - do they know any theory etc.. then build lessons around that..so its not foreign material that takes months to digest..then its simple extensions to what they already know-to keep the interest level high..


"asses"
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#11
Quote by theogonia777
"asses"


well..in some cases
play well

wolf
#12
I think like some said it depends of what the student wants to learn. I am in a smilar position as you except you mention have thought before I never had before this summer.

I am developing my communications skills, tech etc.

She wants to learn chords and play sings songs around d the camp fire lol

So im teacher her all the chords, bar chords and practising her pivots, chord progression etc
#13
Also some banjo students that come in:

"What type of music do you like?"

"I don't know. Every thing I guess."

"Do you look bluegrass?"

"Not really."

"Country?"

"Nah."

"Old time folk music?"

"Never listened to it."

"Folk revival like Pete Seeger?"

"Haven't listened to that either."

"Southern rock? Folk rock? Country rock? Indie?"

"Don't really know any of those."

Then what am I supposed to teach them?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#14
I find teaching guitar to be paradoxical. The students want you to teach them guitar, but they don't actually want to learn anything. So try to keep it fun while slipping something of use in periodically. Like adults sneaking vegetables into pies to get their kids to eat more veggies.
#15
Kids that don't take the lessons seriously.

"Did you practice this week?"

"Oh yeah, I did."

"Really?"

"No."
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#16
I would have been a difficult kid. To teach. I think one of the things for me, was people were showing me things that were too easy, and boring.

I would have much preferred something relevant and difficult.

Some kids though also don't know why they want to learn music, they don't know what they want to learn. They don't know much about it, and it makes it really difficult.
#17
Quote by fingrpikingood
I would have been a difficult kid. To teach. I think one of the things for me, was people were showing me things that were too easy, and boring.

I would have much preferred something relevant and difficult.

Some kids though also don't know why they want to learn music, they don't know what they want to learn. They don't know much about it, and it makes it really difficult.

Yeah... I think it would be important to find what the student really likes and what motivates him/her. Maybe ask what kind of music the student likes listening to. It may be hard to know your goals when you are just starting, but everybody knows what kind of music they like. And if they get to play their favorite songs, I'm pretty sure that will motivate them.
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#18
Some people that take music lessons genuinely seem to not like music though.

"What kind of music do you like?"

"Not sure. Any kind I guess."

"Well what are your favorite bands?"

"I don't really have any."

"What bands do you know?"

"I'm not sure really."

The thing about teaching guitar is that it's a fairly multidimensional and versatile instrument. With banjo it kind of makes two and a half different sounds and if people don't really like either and a half of them then what am I supposed to teach them?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Aug 25, 2015,
#19
^Teach them about the guitar, the superior instrument.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#20
Superior, or douchier? After all, we all know that every single douchebag musician ever has either sang and/or played guitar or piano.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#21
^ victim complex

if a musician can't sing and play piano i don't trust them really

guitar is really lame tho frfr
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#22
Have you ever /been/ to an open mic night before? Some jackass behind the piano singing Maroon 5 or Hallelujah or some shit everytime.

smh

Or the black RnB soul kid that thinks he's Stevie Wonder, only instead of being blind he's obviously hearing impaired if he thinks he's good.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Aug 25, 2015,
#23
at least they don't play banjo
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#24
Why don't you make like a bass and be inaudible.
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#25
kristen do you wanna buy my 8 string i'm trying to fund another custom

i like you so we'll call $1600 good
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#26
you don't even play a real bass

upright, synth, or nothing
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