#3
Roland Dyens is the shit


Also it pisses me off when people say "classic" instead of "classical" even though both could be correct.


Anyway, here's Roland Dyens actually playing one of his arrangements of a jazz standard

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2TVjB87dyY
Last edited by MeGaDeth2314 at Aug 12, 2015,
#4
Why do most Spanish guitarists have extended fretboards but don't have a cutaway on their guitars?
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#5
Quote by Guitar0player at #33545010
Why do most Spanish guitarists have extended fretboards but don't have a cutaway on their guitars?



because it makes you seem more badass when you play on the high frets
#6
Quote by MeGaDeth2314
because it makes you seem more badass when you play on the high frets



I highly respect your opinion but that doesn't look or feel comfortable.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#7
Quote by Guitar0player at #33545020
I highly respect your opinion but that doesn't look or feel comfortable.



lol tbh I have no idea what the real reason is. And it is very uncomfortable, and difficult. My classical guitar has a cut-away so I don't have to deal with that shit.
#8
Quote by MeGaDeth2314
lol tbh I have no idea what the real reason is. And it is very uncomfortable, and difficult. My classical guitar has a cut-away so I don't have to deal with that shit.


By the way I still listen to Skylark like three times a week.
Purple string dampener scrunchy.
#10
Quote by MeGaDeth2314
because it makes you seem more badass when you play on the high frets


Nice one...it is the secret of badassness....
Seriously, I think that the cutaway diminishes considerably the volumetric space inside the guitar. That has repercussions regarding the timbre and volume(db) of the instrument. Ever wonder why violins and cellos maintain the same design?
#13
Guitarists will say that cutaways take away from the sound and volume. Volume is really important since it's a quiet instrument. I'm not really opposed to a cutaway, but most well-respected luthiers aren't going to make cutaways for classical guitarists, nor will classical guitar professionals take you seriously if you have a cutaway.

Roland Dyens is good. I think he's kind of gimmicky and pretentious, though. Tries too hard to be cool and jazzy sometimes. But he's got some good pieces.
#14
Quote by The Madcap at #33546229
Guitarists will say that cutaways take away from the sound and volume. Volume is really important since it's a quiet instrument. I'm not really opposed to a cutaway, but most well-respected luthiers aren't going to make cutaways for classical guitarists, nor will classical guitar professionals take you seriously if you have a cutaway.


I've heard this before and I understand the concept, but I have played and heard cutaway guitars that sound great and still produce plenty of volume. Maybe when you start getting into really high end custom classical guitars it makes more of a difference.
#15
Quote by Guitar0player
Why do most Spanish guitarists have extended fretboards but don't have a cutaway on their guitars?


Most classical pieces don't really need those higher frets. But when they do, yes, they make you look more badass (if you manage to pull them off without ****ing up)
#16
Quote by MeGaDeth2314
I've heard this before and I understand the concept, but I have played and heard cutaway guitars that sound great and still produce plenty of volume. Maybe when you start getting into really high end custom classical guitars it makes more of a difference.


I disagree. I think that a very competent luthier can offset the tonal difference of a cutaway by altering the sound project from the remaining construction. With that being said, I'm not a luthier.

However, I truly believe that the classical guitar world suffers from a lot of "this is how it's always been" mentality.
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#17
Quote by gonzaw
Most classical pieces don't really need those higher frets. But when they do, yes, they make you look more badass (if you manage to pull them off without ****ing up)


There is always the option of making a high fretboard like the guitars of the Assad duo:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6zrHCn5zqY
#20
Quote by Dreadnought
I disagree. I think that a very competent luthier can offset the tonal difference of a cutaway by altering the sound project from the remaining construction. With that being said, I'm not a luthier.

However, I truly believe that the classical guitar world suffers from a lot of "this is how it's always been" mentality.
Yah, I mostly blame the fact that we have had a lot less time being taken seriously as a classical instrument, so our time period of improvement is nothing compared to the keyboard family of violin family.
#21
Agreed, the period of improvement is nothing compared to the keyboard family of violin family . but not because of the fact of less time being taken seriously as a classical instrument...It is just that the instrument is not old enough....don´t you agree?
#22
Quote by The Madcap
Guitarists will say that cutaways take away from the sound and volume. Volume is really important since it's a quiet instrument. I'm not really opposed to a cutaway, but most well-respected luthiers aren't going to make cutaways for classical guitarists, nor will classical guitar professionals take you seriously if you have a cutaway.

Roland Dyens is good. I think he's kind of gimmicky and pretentious, though. Tries too hard to be cool and jazzy sometimes. But he's got some good pieces.


I agree, within this piece.

Could you post something better of him, musically? He has good control.

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#23
Quote by eriguitareri
Agreed, the period of improvement is nothing compared to the keyboard family of violin family . but not because of the fact of less time being taken seriously as a classical instrument...It is just that the instrument is not old enough....don´t you agree?


Not necessarily. The classical guitar community as a whole seems more rigid for other reasons, not just the age of the instrument and its popular performance.
My God, it's full of stars!
#25
^^ That's a nice piece, incredible separation control, but still organic.

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#26
Quote by Dreadnought
Not necessarily. The classical guitar community as a whole seems more rigid for other reasons, not just the age of the instrument and its popular performance.


I can´t see what you mean...can you explain further?
We were talking about the fact that maybe the cutaway is not part of the classical guitar because the instrument needs more years of evolution.
#27
Quote by eriguitareri
I can´t see what you mean...can you explain further?
We were talking about the fact that maybe the cutaway is not part of the classical guitar because the instrument needs more years of evolution.


I was referring to this quote from Madcap:

but most well-respected luthiers aren't going to make cutaways for classical guitarists, nor will classical guitar professionals take you seriously if you have a cutaway.


I think it's not necessarily due to the age of the instrument. Some classical guitarists are simply stuck in "old fashioned" ways
My God, it's full of stars!
#28
Quote by Dreadnought
I was referring to this quote from Madcap:

I think it's not necessarily due to the age of the instrument. Some classical guitarists are simply stuck in "old fashioned" ways



That´s true. But "old fashioned" does not have to be bad...some times is about preserving what is the "best" from the past.