#1
So I am a relatively new guitar player and have recently joined a band. We wrote a song where the intro and verse is clean guitar but the chorus is overdriven guitar. I'm just wondering how you do this live because I'm only using a tube screamer as a booster. If I shut off the tube screamer to get rid of most of the gain there is still gain from the amp. And if I just use the tube screamer gain and have clean settings on the amp it sounds awful. Sorry if that made zero sense, but I guess what I am asking is if there is some type of pedal to make the guitar sound clean, or maybe I am doing something completely wrong. I haven't been playing too long so I am stumped. Anything helps, thank you.
#2
Use the volume control on your guitar. Set it for heavy OD when wide open and roll back to 5-6 to clean things up. Watch Jeff Beck do this on youtube. He is the master at manipulating his gain and tone with only guitar controls.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
what amp are you using? It sounds like you need a 2 channel amp so you can have cleans and distortion on the fly
2002 PRS CE22
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Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#4
I would suggest you buy a distortion pedal. Set the amp to clean and bring in distortion as and when you want. I'm not familiar with a tube screamer, it may be that pedal is okay but you have set it up wrong. I'm sure you could find a video on YouTube if you put the right search in that would explain your needs. Rock on.
#5
how clean do you need? Cajundaddy's plan is good but won't give you crystal cleans if that is needed. i take it you only have a single channel amp? a 2 channel amp would be the best way to get what you want. otherwise perhaps a different overdrive might be the ticket.
#6
I actually do it 3 ways.

Set the amp for squeaky clean Fender tone and set the TS9 or other OD for gain tone. Then just punch in and punch out of OD as needed. It's just like having a 2 channel amp.

Set The OD always on and crunchy, and roll in and out with the guitar volume. I actually prefer this because it gives continuously variable gain at your fingertips. It can get squeaky clean depending on how far down you roll it and how heavy you set the drive on your OD pedal. This gives me room to adjust on the fly depending on the band and audience groove. (Jeff Beck method)

Run a 2 channel amp and set one side to clean and the other to dirty. This works the best when I need heavy Mesa OD tone but the levels are fixed and tougher to adjust on the fly.

Pick your poison, they all will get the job done.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#7
I have a footswitch with my amp (Blackstar ID100TVP) so I tried setting one channel to clean but for some reason it is incredibly quiet as compared to the overdrive so it sounds terrible and uneven. I realize clean is gonna be quieter than OD but not this quiet. Also the footswitch seems to have a second delay when I switch channels which makes it pretty much useless for quick switches. I will try the volume knob technique.
#8
Quote by Cajundaddy
I actually do it 3 ways.

Set the amp for squeaky clean Fender tone and set the TS9 or other OD for gain tone. Then just punch in and punch out of OD as needed. It's just like having a 2 channel amp.

Set The OD always on and crunchy, and roll in and out with the guitar volume. I actually prefer this because it gives continuously variable gain at your fingertips. It can get squeaky clean depending on how far down you roll it and how heavy you set the drive on your OD pedal. This gives me room to adjust on the fly depending on the band and audience groove. (Jeff Beck method)

Run a 2 channel amp and set one side to clean and the other to dirty. This works the best when I need heavy Mesa OD tone but the levels are fixed and tougher to adjust on the fly.

Pick your poison, they all will get the job done.


well you kinda missed an option on 2 channel (or more) amp. i have a 3 channel amp (2 drive channels share tone controls). i set my clean channel to a nice clean tone, my crunch and ultra channels to varied dirty rhythm tones and then use my overdrive for leads. of course you can vary this from your guitar's volume and tone controls as well. i can get a huge pallete of clean to full on metal with this setup.
#9
Quote by monwobobbo
well you kinda missed an option on 2 channel (or more) amp. i have a 3 channel amp (2 drive channels share tone controls). i set my clean channel to a nice clean tone, my crunch and ultra channels to varied dirty rhythm tones and then use my overdrive for leads. of course you can vary this from your guitar's volume and tone controls as well. i can get a huge pallete of clean to full on metal with this setup.


Yep. my Mesa has three gain channels and you can do it that way, I just never do. I prefer to get my crunch with an OD pedal I like rather than the crunch channel on the amp. Different strokes and many ways to skin a cat.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#10
I roll the volume back on the neck pickup so it cleans up. Then you just flick the pickup selector down and you've got your balls out distortion sound.
#11
Quote by Cold Reader
I roll the volume back on the neck pickup so it cleans up. Then you just flick the pickup selector down and you've got your balls out distortion sound.



What he said
#12
Welcome to the nightmare that is electric guitar - overdrive pedals react differently to clean channels and some just sound terrible there. I would suggest using your clean channel and then switching to the drive channel on your amp rather than using an overdrive on the clean channel.

Otherwise, find an overdrive that sounds good on your clean channel.
#13
My amps mostly have at least two channels, and I switch. Generally enough power (50W - 100W) to have a very good clean. Kicking in the second (gain) channel handles the overdrive.
#14
Volume control, like others have said. If you have a good tube amp it should be simple. I like the effect of rolling down the volume because it shapes the EQ a little differently. It smooths out the frequencies and gives me a nice soft clean tone. This is why it's also good to have numbers on your volume knob; I know at above 4-5 is where it's nice and clean but at the edge of break-up. Then just roll it up to 7-8 for the chorus and full-on for the solo and climax.
Your pickup selector switch should be used for adjusting the timbre, not the gain. The bridge and neck pickups are completely different animals. I'm using several combinations of each depending on the song. I wouldn't want to limit my sound to neck for clean or neck for rhythm and bridge for overdrive etc. Learning how to use your volume control will benefit you immensely.
#15
Quote by michaelrendon1111
(a) Volume control, like others have said. If you have a good tube amp it should be simple. I like the effect of rolling down the volume because it shapes the EQ a little differently. It smooths out the frequencies and gives me a nice soft clean tone. This is why it's also good to have numbers on your volume knob; I know at above 4-5 is where it's nice and clean but at the edge of break-up. Then just roll it up to 7-8 for the chorus and full-on for the solo and climax.
(b) Your pickup selector switch should be used for adjusting the timbre, not the gain. The bridge and neck pickups are completely different animals. I'm using several combinations of each depending on the song. I wouldn't want to limit my sound to neck for clean or neck for rhythm and bridge for overdrive etc. Learning how to use your volume control will benefit you immensely.


(a) If you have a treble bleed circuit on the volume knob it won't do that. Some people like the softening, some don't.

(b) It definitely has the drawbacks you mentioned, but some people like doing it, as it takes a lot of the guesswork out of having to roll the volume back just the right amount. Plus if you have a hot bridge pickups it's probably not so great for cleans anyway.

Again, it just depends on what you prefer.
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#16
Channel 1 is clean then i add a Route 66 pedal for light overdrive, then I use the bad monkey for more gain.

Channel 2 Heavy Distortion then I can use my guitar volume to clean it up a bit, then the Bad monkey for even more gain!!

So lots of options.
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Last edited by Guitar137335 at Aug 19, 2015,
#17
Quote by Dave_Mc
(a) If you have a treble bleed circuit on the volume knob it won't do that. Some people like the softening, some don't.

(b) It definitely has the drawbacks you mentioned, but some people like doing it, as it takes a lot of the guesswork out of having to roll the volume back just the right amount. Plus if you have a hot bridge pickups it's probably not so great for cleans anyway.

Again, it just depends on what you prefer.


Good points, Dave. It just goes to show that there is no "right" or "wrong" way to make music.
#18
^
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?