#1
I have learned the basic E shape and A shape barre chords and whenever I watch other guitarists play they seem to use different moveable chords. If anyone knows of any good lessons of other chords or can explain them please do.
#2
if you can make a chord with no open strings you can move it.
CuSO4

"I don't have an instrument, I don't have a great voice, I just have some nice clothes maybe." paul rutherford
#3
Well there's the C shape too:

E-2
B-3
G-2
D-4
A-5
E-x

It's a little bit harder than the E and A but between the three of them you can play pretty much anything major with minimal hand movement. Also worth trying E and A with the thumb holding the root note; it shouldn't replace barres it can be quicker/easier to switch to from other shapes and alternating between thumb-over-neck shapes and barres can help avoid your hand cramping up which isn't much fun in the middle of a song.

Beyond that, major, minor and dominant 7ths are good shapes to learn to start expanding your chord vocabulary across the neck.

Those are the common shapes; Hereiwas is right in that you can experiment with voicings and such and put together your own shapes so in theory the choice is close to unlimited, but the common ones are useful in that they usually get the most possible mileage out of the position (i.e. using as many strings as possible). Hence why moveable D shapes aren't really much use on their own.

If you want to get more creative with chords a good start is learning inversions of the triads across sets of three strings:

E-3-8-12-x-x--x--
B-5-8-13-5-8--13-
G-5-9-12-5-9--12-
D-x-x-x--5-10-14-
A-x-x-x--x-x--x--
E-x-x-x--x-x--x-- etc...


Because you can build on those with extensions and learning those along with which note each is in the chord will really help navigate keys and chords.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 
Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Aug 14, 2015,
#4
Chords are a construct of intervals. Specifically, chords are, for the most part, built off of the root, third, and fifth scale degrees.

let's look at the E major shape in open position

0 - E
0 - B
1 - G#
2 - E
2 - B
0 - E

The key of E major's key signature is F# C# G# D#

As such, the E major scale will be:

1 - E
2 - F#
3 - G#
4 - A
5 - B
6 - C#
7 - D#
1 (8) - E

taking the root, third, and fifth intervals, we see that the E major chord consists of E, G#, and B

then we take the A shape:

0 - E
2 - C#
2 - A
2 - E
0 - A
x

A major having the key signature F# C# G#, we can see that the 1, 3, and 5 are represented

now, an interesting thing to notice, in both of these shapes, they start with the root, fifth, and octave. this both allows stability of the chord (makes it very clear that the voicing is for E and A) and it makes it so there is a 2 fret stretch, making it so, in neither case, the major 3rd appears on or behind the root in structure. For example, in the E major chord, the 3rd comes on the 1st fret on the G string, whereas the root is on the open string (or if you were to barre it on the 1st fret, the root would be F, on the 1st fret, whilst the third would be on the 2nd fret)

why is this important?

let's look at the minor scales for E and A. E's relative major scale is G, making the key signature F#. A's relative major is C, making the key signature open (no sharps or flats). as such, let's look at the E minor scale

1 - E
2 - F#
3 - G
4 - A
5 - B
6 - C
7 - D

This doesn't affect our root, second, fourth, or fifth, but the 3rd is different, as are the 6th and 7th. now let's try changing up our initial E major chord for an E minor with this accounted for. since there's only one appearance of G# in the E major chord, to make it minor, we only have to shift that down to a G. this would be

0 - E
0 - B
0 - G
2 - E
2 - B
0 - E

since we have that gap, it's totally feasible to change out major and minor chords by moving your index finger (or in barres, your middle finger) away from the string. similarly for A minor,

0 - E
1 - C
2 - A
2 - E
0 - A
x

this makes them very applicable as barre chords, as you can go up and down a scale by moving this one shape up 12 frets according to the scale and only adjust one finger

this explains why the two shapes you know work, but these don't help you learn new shapes, right? wrong. all chords are the basis of a stacking of intervals, and by understanding the makeup of chords, you can make your own voicings and superimpose them all over the fretboard.

for example, take the A major chord rearranged on another part of the fretboard

x
x
2- A
2 - E
4 - C#
5 - A

just like before, we can move that C# back, and suddenly

x
x
2 - A
2 - E
3 - C
5 - A

we have A minor

the major and minors are only the tip of the iceberg, though. i won't get too crazy on extensions, but we'll take a moment to talk about sus chords and 7ths so you can get the creative juices flowing and figure out your own ways to utilize these. just being able to use a cleverly placed 7th chord or sus chord into a progression will exponentially increase your ability to bring tension or depth to a simple rock progression

so far we've talked about the major and minor chords, which have the root, third, and fifth. whether the chord was major or minor, however, was based solely on whether the third was major or minor (a major third being 4 semitones above the root, a minor third being only 3), but there are a few very simple chords that are neither major nor minor, and utilizing them to move into a regular chord can help provide movement and intrigue to spice up your chord choices

as we know, power chords are made only from the root or fifth. this means that they are neither major or minor, though their role is implied. just to drive this home, an E power chord

x
x
x
2 - E
2 - A
0 - E

however, we can extend this to include the 2nd and 4th intervals

as we noted before, when we switch between the major and minor scales of the same root, the 3rd, 6th, and 7th are affected, but the root, 2nd, 4th, and 5th are not. this means that the 2nd and 4th, in addition to the root and fifth, do not necessarily provide any hints as to whether something's major or minor (though it might be implied by the progression's movement)

by utilizing these, and not including the 3rd, we'll call them sus chords (sus for suspended chords, meaning they don't quite know where they want to go - major or minor). here's an Esus2

x
x
x
4 - F#
2 - A
0 - E

this can be moved all over, like so, with an Asus4

x
x
x
9 - B
7 - E
5 - A

now let's extend this to include our sus4s. here's an Esus4

x
x
0 - G
2 - E
0 - A
0 - E

and an Asus4

x
x
5 - E
7 - A
5 - D
5 - A

you can also remove the fifth (the g-string with these voicings) to add a bit more ambiguity, and, with high distortion, it removed a little bit of clutter and density from the note so the 4th can resound a little more easily

now let's talk 7th chords. 7th chords are simply your regular major and minor chords (1 3 5), but with the 7th interval added in. this also adds another way to identify your chord as major or minor - and to mix the two.

let's look at what makes up an Emaj7

(1 - E)
2 - F#
(3 - G#)
4 - A
(5 - B)
6 - C#
(7 - D#)

This means, to play an Emaj7, we want to represent the notes E, G#, B, and D#. fortunately, this is very easy to do when taking a look at our original chord shape

0 - E
0 - B
1 - G#
2 - E
2 - B
0 - E

now let's think about the way we switch from major to minor. Since, for example, C is only 1 fret below C#, what note might be closest to D#?

since our octave (E) is directly by that D#, we can just move that down, making the voicing for our open Emaj7

0 - E
0 - B
1 - G#
1 - D#
2 - B
0 - E

and we can barre this and move it around as you wish

hopefully you've been playing each of these chords as they've come up, as each voicing is unique and, as you explore new chord shapes on your own with the basics i'm typing right now, you're gonna wanna internalize all of the different sounds you can make so whenever you think "how can i make this chord sound cooler?" you have an arsenal of alternatives at your disposal

now, if you did play that maj7 chord shape (especially if you played it quickly instead of hitting each note at once) you'll notice that it sounds really, really bad. this is because that D# is "fighting" your root notes. in general, you very rarely want to play notes together that are 1 fret from one another, and you'll very rarely implement the maj7 chord in your playing, but it's important to keep in mind nonetheless, and using it in a way where you take that horrible sounding chord and move up to the root can give some satisfying results

now, let's look at the two 7th chords you're actually likely to utilize, starting with your minor 7th chord. just like how we took our initial scale shape to move our Emaj to Emaj7, let's take our E minor's octave root down two frets to reach the minor 7. as a refresher, here's E minor:

0 - E
0 - B
0 - G
2 - E
2 - B
0 - E

now let's turn this into our minor 7, by turning that E to a D

0 - E
0 - B
0 - G
0 - D
2 - B
0 - E

easy, right? now let's look at how we might apply this to a barre chord. Aminor7:

5 - A
5 - E
5 - C
5 - G
7 - E
5 - A

this is a gimme for the 6 string version, but your assignment is gonna be figuring out how to adjust your A barre chord for this, then doing it with 4 strings, and past that you can start experimenting to your heart's content. especially if you're playing metal or hard rock with a lot of distortion, the more complex your chord voicings are, the less you're gonna be able to hear, so it's important to experiment and figure out whether having the 3rd and 7th will both help the sound you want to make!

moving on from the minor 7th chord, we're gonna approach somewhat interesting territory. as the major 7th chord sounds pretty terrible, there is a very common alternative: taking the major chord (1, major 3rd, 5th) and adding a minor 7 to it. This eliminates the dissonance, and if you play this chord voicing, then move down a fifth to a major chord, it resolves very, very happily.

this maj3min7 chord has a couple different names. in most theory textbooks, they'll call it a major/minor chord or a M/m7. most people in the real world will call them dominant 7ths as they're typically used in a V chord (a chord built on the 5th in the key - for example, a B major chord in the key of E major) - but that's a little above you right now. anyways, if you see these chords on a lead sheet/staff paper/sheet music/etc., they'll typically just be written as, for example, E7. to distinguish this from the other two, they will typically be written as Em7 for minor 7 and Emaj7 for major 7.

now, on to how we make it. again, we'll take the E major chord:

0 - E
0 - B
1 - G#
2 - E
2 - B
0 - E

now, we want that E to be a D, like in Em7, but we want to keep the G#, so instead we play it as:

0 - E
0 - B
1 - G#
0 - D
2 - B
0 - E

and, if we move it up to the B, for example,

7 - B
7 - F#
8 - D#
7 - A
9 - F#
7 - B

this is just a bunch of examples and basics, but learn your key signatures and break down the important intervals to build your own scale shapes. remember that the most important notes in scales are your chord tones (1, 3, 5, etc), and if you know where your 3rds, 5ths, and 7ths are from what you're playing at any given time, you can master the entire fretboard very, very easily

e: i hope the dudes in MT don't see that the first long theory related post i've written in like a year isn't in MT
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#5
^Hail's still right.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i