#1
Hello everyone.

So, i am currently working on the tune "A Night in Tunisia". One of my favorite jazz tunes, so i eared out the melody and progression, and will now find a recording to start transcribing some vocabulary.

Anyhow, i just wanted to make sure i got the CST right on the intro, since i use tunes to practice scales, arpeggios and chord voicings. The arpeggios and chords are pretty self-explanatory, but i just wanted to check if i got the CST right.

Now i believe A section of "Night in Tunisia" goes between a Eb9 and a Dm6 chord, i assumed that the Eb9 chord was a tri-tone sub for A7alt, so in reality the A section is basically a V - I progression (with the exception of the minor 2-5-1 at the end of the A section). Then would i be correct in assuming that i would be playing Bb melodic minor (A altered) over the Eb9?

I appreciate all the help i can get, cheers!
#2
That's certainly the simplest way to look at it. Good job.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#3
I'd root the relevant scale on the chord it's being used with, to keep everything consistent in analysis. Bb melodic minor = Eb lydian dominant.

But also do look a the head and improv lines over that chord to see how the players treat it. The straightforward chord/scale relationships can't always be relied upon.
Last edited by cdgraves at Aug 15, 2015,
#4
Haven't played this for ages ... great tune.

The Charlie Parker versions I've heard for the melody could as easily be seen mainly using D Aeolian with chromatic approaches to the root D (7->r), and 5 (b5 ->5). Or as A HM5 , ending with the G# -> A (b5 to 5) of Dm.

If I remember rightly, there's a lot of A HM5 used (rather than A Altered).

I'm going to have to learn again that famous flat out break used by CP at the end of the melody introducing the solo.

I used to love playing this tune, and mucking around with the chords.

I do remember slipping in the m7b5 trick for the ii V i (Em7b5 -> Gm7b5 -> Bm7b5) at end of melody.

Nice voicing using treble 4 strings to move for this (missing the root which the bass would supply)

x x 8 7 8 5 (Em7b5) up a minor 3rd to

x x 11 10 11 8 (pretend underneath harmony is A altered chord, so there's a Gm7b5 a tone below (from Bb melodic minor)). up a maj 3rd to

x x 15 14 15 12 (Bm7b5 substitute for Dm6)

Good luck with the transcription.

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Aug 16, 2015,
#5
Quote by Jet Penguin
That's certainly the simplest way to look at it.


Is there any other way i should look at it as well? I'd love to know if there is something i am missing.
#6
^Well like CD said, you want to keep your roots the same.

So instead of thinking A Alt over Eb7, you want to think Eb Lydian Dominant over Eb7, since that's what it is.

A dominant resolving with non dominant motion, like in this case, is usually implying a Lydian Dominant sound, so you would use Eb7.

This happens to be the same scale as A Altered, but thinking about it like Eb scale = Eb chord is much easier than doing some transposition in your head.

The OTHER way to think about it is to realize that there's a literal truckload of sounds you can make work over a Dom7 chord, and start playing around with less "vanilla" ideas.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#7
Quote by MrDjango
Is there any other way i should look at it as well? I'd love to know if there is something i am missing.

Make sure you look at the voice-leading, i.e., the links between chords, resolutions to chord tones.
Don't think of chords (at least in this kind of music) as isolated entities. (CST was really designed for modal jazz, not this kind of functional harmony.)

Between Eb9 and Dm6, the links should be pretty plain, as the root relationship is a strong hint to all those other half-step moves (whole step in just one case).

Eb7(13#11) > Dm(6,9,maj7)

Eb > D or E
F > F or E
G > F or A
A > A (shared tone, and dominant of key)
Bb > A or B
C > B (or C#?)
Db (C#) > D

You could think of it as Bb melodic minor going to D melodic minor, but that puts the two harmonies too far apart, IMO. (I.e., it's not about jumping up a major 3rd! The Bb melodic minor relationship with Eb9 (and A altered) is pure coincidence, has no functional meaning.)

Also, jerry is probably right (I haven't checked!) that CP might have been using some D harmonic minor, seeing as CST was invented well after his time! (There's evidence in much of his other playing that harmonic minor was a bigger part of his toolkit than some later jazz theorists like to think...)

Above all, think of melody and rhythm (before harmony). As Dizzy himself said "Some people think of a note and put a rhythm to it. I think of a rhythm and put a note to it."
Last edited by jongtr at Aug 16, 2015,