#1
I have always played C major chord like this


e|---0--------------------------|
B|---1------------------------|
G|----0------------------------|
D|------2-----------------------|
A|---------3--------------------|
E|-----------------------------|


My guitar teacher insists I now play it like this and just says he knows


e|---3--------------------------|
B|---1------------------------|
G|----x------------------------|
D|------2-----------------------|
A|---------3--------------------|
E|-----------------------------|

Keeping that open G silent as you strum and not accidentaly muting the E on the D string slows me down a bit.

Does it matter?


Also I changed an A5 chord song in a song I am learning from 577 to 022? Do these things matter?
#2
That's just different voicing for the same chord. It's just a different option available to you, and it only matters if you want it to matter. It gives you a slightly different sound and may be useful in certain situations where voice leading (how the notes of a chord flow into one another) is concerned. But there is no reason to always play it one way over the other.

As for the A5 change, it just changes the sound of the chord a bit, but it's still the same chord.
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#3
the change isn't just in tone, but in voice-leading and functionality

of course, these things are useless outside of the scope of a progression
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#4
It does matter. Different inversions of the same chord have different sounds.
#5
So what version sounds best or easiest?


As for the A5 chord if I substitute it to the cloest one does the riff become wrong...or still right just with a different sound that might be different from the original?
#6
Quote by MyOceanToSwim
I have always played C major chord like this


e|---0--------------------------|
B|---1------------------------|
G|----0------------------------|
D|------2-----------------------|
A|---------3--------------------|
E|-----------------------------|


My guitar teacher insists I now play it like this and just says he knows


e|---3--------------------------|
B|---1------------------------|
G|----x------------------------|
D|------2-----------------------|
A|---------3--------------------|
E|-----------------------------|

Keeping that open G silent as you strum and not accidentaly muting the E on the D string slows me down a bit.

Does it matter?


In a certain song, it might matter. The two chords sound a bit different.

The notion that the former is incorrect and the latter is correct, however, is absurd, and quite frankly I would suggest you find a better guitar teacher if they recommend the latter as a matter of principle. If he's just trying to teach you some flexibility, on the other hand, that's no big deal.


Also I changed an A5 chord song in a song I am learning from 577 to 022? Do these things matter?


This matters less than the previous one, but, again, they will sound somewhat different. As you gain experience and (particularly) as your ear develops, you'll become more intuitive about switching between forms like this to take advantage of the differences.

In this case, for example, you might really not want the open string ringing that you get with 022.
#7
there are quite a few different ways to play the same chord...learning the inversions of a triad - (three note chord 1 3 5) on different sets of strings produce a sense of harmonic movement even though your just playing the same chord..your teacher is giving you a slight preview of how a chord can sound a bit different by changing the voicing of the top note from the open E string to the G note...

you would do good to ask your teacher to show you some inversions of basic triads and perhaps how to use them in something your are working on now
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#8
Different voicings sound different. Having the G as your highest note will sound different than having E as your highest note. But both are C major chords. Listen to the sound of both voicings and use the one whose sound you prefer. Which one sounds better is about context.

Whether you should play 5 7 7 or 0 2 2 is up to you. They have exactly the same notes. The only thing that will make them sound slightly different is the open string and the lighter string gauges in the latter voicing.
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#9
Well, they sound different, so I suppose that matters when it matters. Is there a specific song you're learning with this chord?

And if your teacher mentioned technique, there's probably a technique related reason for playing it that way - maybe to get your left hand control going. LH muting is a pretty important technique, as is pinky control.


As for 577 vs 022, which you use depends on what other chords you're playing before/after. Usually you'd choose the chord that is either physically closest to the surrounding chords, or that has the same tone as the other chords. If you were playing a bunch of other chords that started on the A string, you might choose the 022 voicing for consistency in the tone. If you were playing a bunch of chords further up on the neck, 577 might be more sensible.
Last edited by cdgraves at Aug 16, 2015,
#10
Try to learn as many variations as possible.
If you are doing a cover you should try to the same voicing as the original.
For the record I have never come across the Cmaj that your teacher says to use.
Any teacher who says, "because I say so" is prob. bad.
#11
actually read the OP, why the hell would he recommend that as how to play a c open (unless it's part of an actual song that uses that voicing). also, you can play that G open, since, yknow, the G on the e string is the same note but an octave higher
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#12
It depends on the song and the genre. Sometimes you have to use a certain voicing. Voice leading and all. Sometimes you can play whatever you want though. I've always played C as 332010 because I like to do the 1-5 alternating bass on the low strings since I play mainly country on guitar. Occasionally I'll do 335553 for the same reason. The shape your teacher gave you is silly unless it is supposed to be moveable, but there are better options for moveable major chords, such as the standard 133211 and 224442 shape barre chords.

Quote by PSimonR
Any teacher who says, "because I say so" is prob. bad.


This could depend. Sometimes when teaching a student, they aren't knowledgeable enough when it comes to theory and so it would be more confusing to explain why something is, so it's better to say "just trust me on this for now" and then elaborate when they get there.

In TS's example though it's stupid.

But to give a good exmple... on banjo the first chord taught after the open G is usually D7 voiced x0210 (though technically there is no third) because it is very functional (because V-I) and simple to play. This is usually first lesson stuff, so it's generally better to say "trust me on this" than to explain to somebody who just got their first instrument a week ago why a 7th chord is a 7th chord.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Aug 16, 2015,
#13
Quote by MyOceanToSwim
My guitar teacher insists I now play it like this and just says he knows
I think you should ask him why. Trust him - for the reasons theogonia says - but he should be able to give you a good reason.

A good reason might be: "because it's good to have several options for any one chord. (Don't get into fixed habits.)"
Another good reason might be: "because that's how C is played in his song we're learning."

Easy enough to understand, right?

If he can't give you a clear answer - or if he just says "this is the best shape for C" - I tend to agree with PSimonR: that's bad teaching. (Good teachers always like students to ask questions. Sometimes, it's true, "why?" can lead you off on confusing tangents, but I can't see it in this case.)
Quote by MyOceanToSwim

Also I changed an A5 chord song in a song I am learning from 577 to 022? Do these things matter?
The difference there is obviously in the position, and the use of the open string. The actual voicing (the order of the notes in the chord) is the same.
Again it's about context. In some songs 577xxx might work best - especially if you want to fret mute the chord, or slide that shape around into other power chords. In some songs x022xx might work best, eg, if you want that open A ringing.
#14
Just combine them and play x 3 2 0 1 3. Problem solved.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#15
^ Yeah. There's already a G in it, 3rd fret of the high E string, so the open G string is not really going to add anything new to the sound of the chord. I doubt you could hear a difference between x 3 2 0 1 3 and x 3 2 x 1 3.

But yeah, x 3 2 0 1 3 and x 3 2 0 1 0 are both C major chords. The highest note is just different and that makes the voicings sound a bit different. But you can use either.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
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Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 17, 2015,
#16
Some other C chords:
3 3 2 0 1 0 (C/G)
x 3 5 5 5 3
8 7 5 5 5 8
8 10 10 9 8 8
x x 10 12 13 12
x 15 14 12 13 12

OK that's enough C chords.... (or is it??)
#17
^Now play all those over:

F, Bb, Ab, Db, Am, Gm, Fm, Dm, Bb7, A7, F#7, E7, Eb7, D7, or Dm7b5

and REALLY get the party started.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#18
Quote by yope
It does matter. Different inversions of the same chord have different sounds.

They are the same inversion.

Different voicing.

The general answer to the question is that it does not matter.

Is he telling you this in relation to a specific song? Then it might matter.

The presence of the high G as opposed to the open E is something that will give you a slightly different sound. The muted G string will have a miniscule impact on the overall sound of the chord but it will have an impact.

They are both C chords though. And if he's not talking about a specific use of that chord and saying that's just how you're supposed to play it all the time then he's just plain wrong.
Si
#19
Quote by MyOceanToSwim
I have always played C major chord like this


e|---0--------------------------|
B|---1------------------------|
G|----0------------------------|
D|------2-----------------------|
A|---------3--------------------|
E|-----------------------------|


My guitar teacher insists I now play it like this and just says he knows


e|---3--------------------------|
B|---1------------------------|
G|----x------------------------|
D|------2-----------------------|
A|---------3--------------------|
E|-----------------------------|

Keeping that open G silent as you strum and not accidentaly muting the E on the D string slows me down a bit.

Does it matter?


Also I changed an A5 chord song in a song I am learning from 577 to 022? Do these things matter?


he should not tell you to play it this way every time because the chord is not played that way every time in every song. Using the correct inversions(inversions means different ways to play the same chord) is a huge big deal because it makes the song sound like the particular song you are playing. It's like different shades of the same color think of it that way.
The A 5 even matters because even though it's the same notes exactly your guitar, everybody's guitar sounds a little different up-and-down fretboard.
#20
As a fingerpicker I use that inversion a lot, but also the regular C chord and also a C chord with the bottom G.

Ask your teacher how to correctly finger a first position A chord. Most people play it like this:

E|-------0-------
B|-------3-------
G|-------2-------
D|-------1-------
A|-------0-------
E|-------X--------

I play it like this however:

E|-------0-------
B|-------3-------
G|-------1-------
D|-------2-------
A|-------0-------
E|-------X--------

With this I can tuck the first finger in right up close to the fret, whereas with the other it's very easy to get a buzz on the D string. Now that matters :-)
Last edited by The Backslider at Aug 23, 2015,
#21
Quote by yope
Using the correct inversions(inversions means different ways to play the same chord) is a huge big deal because it makes the song sound like the particular song you are playing. It's like different shades of the same color think of it that way.


Most of what you have said is spot on. But you have some terminology wrong.

The word you are looking for is "voicing".

A chord voicing refers to the specific arrangement of the notes within a chord. (or different ways to play the same chord)

The term inversion refers to a chord in which a chord tone other than the root note is used as the bass or lowest note in the chord. It is not concerned with the rest of the notes in the chord, just the bass.

Thus you can have chords played in very different ways (different voicings) but in the same inversion, so long as in both cases the same chord tone is the lowest note in the chord.
Si
#22
just gonna back up 20T here in saying that yeah, inversions have a very specific definition
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#23
Quote by Hail
just gonna back up 20T here ...

What the hell's going on?!?!? I had to run outside to see to check the moon wasn't bleeding or anything!!
Si
#24
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#25
Damn 20T, I have to do another Bloodborne run now.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#26
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Damn 20T, I have to do another Bloodborne run now.


berserk has a better bloodmoon and you'd prob finish it quicker, JS
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#27
Yeah but I'm all about dat Souls life.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#28
artorias is based off guts, as is a loooot of souls/bloodborne lore
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#30
I'm not disagreeing with either of you, I just like what I like, son.

It is neither wholly original or the best in its genre, but that does not negate its goodness.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#31
I've pretty much come to the conclusion different voicings...different people like different voicings some voicings sound better in some keys than others and basically stopped worrying about this.

This guy talks briefly about voicings:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uwPUO7LNpY

If I am ever in a situation where the chord is really important I'll try different versions etc etc but mostly it doesn't matter too much.
#32
try telling eric johnson voicings don't matter
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