#1
3 or 4 weeks ago my g string/ 3rd string broke and I haven't put a string on it ever since..but now i just got my string and I'm gonna change the whole thing and I'm worried that it will break the neck or any part of my guitar cause of the tension. and yesterday i loosen all the other strings left cause i figured it would help but idk..should i take it to guitar center and just let them figure it out and change it? and how much does it cost? please help that guitar was expensive and i wouldn't want to break it or anything.. so heeelppp.. also it looks like the neck is not straight straight. -.-

PS: i know its long but please i need help.. thanks
#2
I've never seen restringing a guitar "break the neck".

I've never seen leaving one string off for a couple of weeks cause a guitar's neck to break.

The only thing likely to happen would be the neck loses its "relief", and a simple adjustment would take care of that.

For 99.99% of the people in the world who play guitars, nothing bad will happen, especially over the course of only a few weeks. You could be the first, but I frankly doubt it.

Here's a guide to setting up a guitar: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html I think it will seem complicated to you at first, but read it a couple of times and it will start to make sense.

Oh, and do google this word, "histrionics". That should help to explain your state of mind.
#4
Yep just change the strings. Makes no difference if you change one at a time or remove all first, it won't hurt the neck either way.

The only time removing all the strings is an issue is with Strat style guitars with floating bridge, the tension of the springs in back makes retuning take several tries.

With an acoustic that's not a problem, just make sure you wiggle the string pegs into place while pulling the ball end of the string up against it so they seat well. Put the ball end all the way in. Put the peg partially in. Pull string up till it contacts peg, you can feel it. Keep pulling string upward while pushing peg into the hole, both will finally seat, You should still be able to see some of the wrapped section of the string, if not you have too much in the hole. Pull it out and do it again.

My best advice is to take it to a music store and have them change the strings, and tell them you want to watch so you can learn how. If they say no, go somewhere else.

I wrap my strings a specific way and have found it works well, I've been doing it this way for 20 years or more.

I cut the string about 1½" past the post it goes through. Put the string through the tuning peg, leave a little under ½" tag end. Start winding the string and make sure I get a good kink where it goes into the hole. First wrap goes on top of the tag end, seconds and others under it, this lets it pinch the string and helps keep it in place. I can play this guitar onstage all night and have only minor tuning adjustments if temperature changes a little. Sitting at home, it stays in tune for a couple of weeks.

It usually leaves 2 or 3 wraps, plenty to hold it in place and keep tuning well.


IMGP68640 by Paleo Pete, on Flickr
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Aug 17, 2015,
#5
Quote by Captaincranky
I've never seen restringing a guitar "break the neck".

I've never seen leaving one string off for a couple of weeks cause a guitar's neck to break.

The only thing likely to happen would be the neck loses its "relief", and a simple adjustment would take care of that.

For 99.99% of the people in the world who play guitars, nothing bad will happen, especially over the course of only a few weeks. You could be the first, but I frankly doubt it.

Here's a guide to setting up a guitar: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html I think it will seem complicated to you at first, but read it a couple of times and it will start to make sense.

Oh, and do google this word, "histrionics". That should help to explain your state of mind.

Well I'm sorry for seeming to be waaayy too exaggerated.. my guitar is way to expensive and I'm sure anyone thats kinda new to a guitar and anyone that never changed a string would be pretty scared for their own guitar .-. oh btw i aint tryna attract anyones attention i was just really confused geez -.- but anyways thanks for the help
#6
Quote by ashiiee010
Well I'm sorry for seeming to be waaayy too exaggerated.. my guitar is way to expensive and I'm sure anyone thats kinda new to a guitar and anyone that never changed a string would be pretty scared for their own guitar .-. oh btw i aint tryna attract anyones attention i was just really confused geez -.- but anyways thanks for the help
This is an "expensive guitar": You can be the proud owner of the un-autographed model, for a paltry five grand.

I wouldn't hesitate to yank all the strings off it at one time, and I'm sure after you have a few string jobs under your belt, neither would you!
#8
Quote by Tony Done
Hmmm, buying expensive (however you want to define it) guitars and not knowing how to change the strings seems a bit, er, incompatible to me.
Easy dude, you don't want to be coveting my reputation as "resident smart ass".
#9
^^^^ Oh, I daresay I can be just as grumpy as you when I put my mind to it.

And kudos to PP for explaining it in detail. - That is the method I use, except I crimp the string before putting it in the hole. Some would say that you should crimp before cutting to stop the windings unravelling, but with modern string sets I've never had a problem with that.
Last edited by Tony Done at Aug 18, 2015,
#10
Quote by Captaincranky
This is an "expensive guitar": You can be the proud owner of the un-autographed model, for a paltry five grand.

I wouldn't hesitate to yank all the strings off it at one time, and I'm sure after you have a few string jobs under your belt, neither would you!

lmfao... yep that is wayy too expensive compared to mine...mine was already like 3000 .-.
#11
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^ Oh, I daresay I can be just as grumpy as you when I put my mind to it.

And kudos to PP for explaining it in detail. - That is the method I use, except I crimp the string before putting it in the hole. Some would say that you should crimp before cutting to stop the windings unravelling, but with modern string sets I've never had a problem with that.

thanks